Tropical Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Tropical Disease News and Research

Tropical diseases encompass all diseases that occur solely, or principally, in the tropics. In practice, the term is often taken to refer to infectious diseases that thrive in hot, humid conditions, such as malaria, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, Chagas disease, African trypanosomiasis, and dengue.
Research breakthroughs may pave way for new drugs to fight against parasitic worm infections

Research breakthroughs may pave way for new drugs to fight against parasitic worm infections

Recent breakthroughs may pave the way for vaccines and new drugs for those infected by parasitic helminths. These flatworms, including tapeworms that cause hydatid diseases and neurocysticercosis, liver flukes, and blood flukes (schistosomes), infect more than 300 million people and cause approximately four million disability-adjusted life years lost due to chronic illness and death each year. [More]
AfriCoLeish launches Phase III clinical study to test 2 treatments for HIV-VL co-infected patients

AfriCoLeish launches Phase III clinical study to test 2 treatments for HIV-VL co-infected patients

The international research & development (R&D) consortium, AfriCoLeish, formed by six research organizations from East Africa and Europe, has launched a Phase III clinical study to address the extreme difficulty in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in patients who also are HIV-positive. [More]
Celgene Global Health, DNDi expand partnership to identify new drug candidates for NTDs

Celgene Global Health, DNDi expand partnership to identify new drug candidates for NTDs

Celgene Global Health, a division of Celgene Corporation, and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative strengthen their collaboration with a four-year Research Collaboration Agreement to identify and optimize new drug candidates for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). [More]
Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients

Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients

When the body receives an injury to the skin, a signal is sent to the brain, which generates a sensation of pain. [More]
Human impact on environment plays a larger role in spread of schistosomiasis, says study

Human impact on environment plays a larger role in spread of schistosomiasis, says study

National Museum of Natural History scientist Bert Van Bocxlaer and an international team of researchers revealed that anthropogenic changes in Africa's Lake Malaŵi are a driving force behind the increase of urogenital schistosomiasis, a debilitating tropical disease caused by parasitic flatworms. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]
TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

The outbreak of dengue fever that infected some 20 people in Florida's Martin County late last year unnerved many who feared the tropical disease had once again established a foothold in Florida. The last outbreaks occurred in 2009 and 2010 in Key West—before that, the disease hadn't struck Florida in more than 70 years. [More]
GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced three grants worth a total of US$6.8 million to speed the development of innovative drugs for some of the world’s most neglected diseases—schistosomiasis, Chagas disease and parasitic roundworms. [More]
LSTM and University of Liverpool receive GHIT Fund to target lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis

LSTM and University of Liverpool receive GHIT Fund to target lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis

The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) together with colleagues at the Department of Chemistry (University of Liverpool (UoL)) and Japanese pharmaceutical company Eisai are pleased to announce that they have been awarded a Global Health Innovative Technology (GHIT) Fund to develop new drugs to target lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. [More]
Warmer temperatures allow malaria to spread to higher elevations

Warmer temperatures allow malaria to spread to higher elevations

Malaria, a mosquito-borne disease, infects more than 300 million people each year. Cooler highland regions have historically provided havens from malaria, but it has been predicted that the disease could be especially sensitive to climate change, since both the Plasmodium parasites that cause it and the Anopheles mosquitoes that spread it thrive at warm temperatures. The potential impact of global warming on the worldwide incidence of malaria has been debated for more than two decades. [More]
Indonesia's commitment, investment in eliminating NTDs could lift millions of people out of poverty

Indonesia's commitment, investment in eliminating NTDs could lift millions of people out of poverty

The control and elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is one of the most cost-effective ways Indonesia can sustain economic growth and reduce inequality, said scientists today in an analysis published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. [More]
New research may provide insight on how dengue virus gains entry into cells

New research may provide insight on how dengue virus gains entry into cells

Dengue fever, an infectious tropical disease caused by a mosquito-borne virus, afflicts millions of people each year, causing fever, headache, muscle and joint pains and a characteristic skin rash. In some people the disease progresses to a severe, often fatal, form known as dengue hemorrhagic fever. [More]
Researchers to highlight biomedical breakthroughs, new discoveries at Biophysical Society Meeting

Researchers to highlight biomedical breakthroughs, new discoveries at Biophysical Society Meeting

Ask a question about how the human immune system fights a tropical disease, or how viruses like HIV use genetic tricks to resist drugs, or how plant cells capture light, or how Alzheimer's takes hold in the brain, or how we can better fight diseases like cancer, or why some sperm cells are fertile while others are not, and you may have to narrow your gaze to the nanoscale to find answers. [More]
Selcia, University of Edinburgh collaborate to develop novel treatments for sleeping sickness

Selcia, University of Edinburgh collaborate to develop novel treatments for sleeping sickness

An initiative is under way to develop new drugs for a devastating tropical disease that threatens almost 70 million people in Africa. [More]
USF Health receives $2.1M grant to study on new factors required for growth of malaria-related parasites

USF Health receives $2.1M grant to study on new factors required for growth of malaria-related parasites

Animal cells similar to those of humans contain a "control room," called the centrosome, which regulates cell replication. Disrupt this core hub and you kill cell division. [More]
Researchers observe mating for the first time in microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness

Researchers observe mating for the first time in microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness

Caught in the act! Researchers from the University of Bristol have observed mating for the first time in the microbes responsible for African sleeping sickness. This tropical disease is caused by trypanosomes, single-celled parasites that are found in the blood of those afflicted. [More]
Researchers develop a class of compounds that may help eradicate Chagas disease

Researchers develop a class of compounds that may help eradicate Chagas disease

A team of researchers from Canada has developed a class of compounds which may help eradicate a neglected tropical disease that is currently hard to kill in its chronic form. The research was published ahead of print in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. [More]
New tools for neglected diseases: an interview with Dr. BT Slingsby, CEO, GHIT Fund

New tools for neglected diseases: an interview with Dr. BT Slingsby, CEO, GHIT Fund

Nearly 3.3 billion people, a little less than half of our world’s population, are at risk of malaria, TB and what we call “neglected tropical diseases”—diseases caused by worms, parasites, viruses and bacteria like Chagas disease, river blindness, elephantiasis, sleeping sickness, etc. [More]
Scientists identify new approach to fight malaria parasites

Scientists identify new approach to fight malaria parasites

Using advanced methodologies that pit drug compounds against specific types of malaria parasite cells, an international team of scientists, including researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, have identified a potential new weapon and approach for attacking the parasites that cause malaria. [More]

PLOS and DNDi to launch collection of neglected tropical diseases at 10-year anniversary of DNDi

As part of a collaborative initiative, PLOS and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) are delighted to be launching a special Collection-PLOS & DNDi: a decade of Open Access and Neglected Tropical Diseases R&D (Research and Development)-to coincide with a joint event at the Institut Pasteur in Paris celebrating the 10-year anniversary of DNDi. [More]