Tuberculosis News and Research RSS Feed - Tuberculosis News and Research

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you think you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests as soon as possible. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.
New study identifies alternative route for tuberculosis infection

New study identifies alternative route for tuberculosis infection

Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a new way that tuberculosis bacteria get into the body, revealing a potential therapeutic angle to explore. [More]
WHO urges countries to take rapid action to reduce new infections, deaths from viral hepatitis

WHO urges countries to take rapid action to reduce new infections, deaths from viral hepatitis

Ahead of World Hepatitis Day, 28 July 2016, WHO is urging countries to take rapid action to improve knowledge about the disease, and to increase access to testing and treatment services. [More]
New technique could help produce enhanced imaging results with ordinary microscopes

New technique could help produce enhanced imaging results with ordinary microscopes

Research completed through a collaboration with University of Missouri engineers, biologists, and chemists could transform how scientists study molecules and cells at sub-microscopic (nanoscale) levels. [More]
Eating more healthy fats may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Eating more healthy fats may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Eating more unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fats, in place of either dietary carbohydrate or saturated fats lowers blood sugar levels and improves insulin resistance and secretion, according to a new meta-analysis of data from 102 randomised controlled feeding trials in adults. [More]
Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners

Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners

The War on Drugs, mass incarceration of drug users, and the failure to provide proven harm reduction and treatment strategies has led to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis, and hepatitis B and C infection among prisoners—far higher than in the general population. [More]
Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Prisoners and detainees worldwide have higher burdens of HIV, viral hepatitis and tuberculosis than the communities from which they come, and the regular cycling of infected people in and out of incarceration is worsening the epidemics both inside and outside of prison, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
New Global Fund report shows significant increase in HIV treatment

New Global Fund report shows significant increase in HIV treatment

Ahead of next week’s International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria today released results that show a significant increase in the number of people being treated for HIV. [More]
Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Zoonotic diseases are diseases or infections which are naturally transmissible from animals to humans, as defined in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. [More]
Researchers receive $9 million grant to develop novel platform to quickly identify new antibiotics

Researchers receive $9 million grant to develop novel platform to quickly identify new antibiotics

In September 2014, President Obama issued an executive order for "Combating Antibiotic- Resistant Bacteria." Why the urgency? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the order noted, "estimates that annually at least 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths are caused by antibiotic- resistant bacteria in the United States alone." [More]
Study provides insight into why individual mycobacteria respond differently to antibiotics

Study provides insight into why individual mycobacteria respond differently to antibiotics

Tuberculosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world, infecting almost 10 million people each year. Treating the disease can be challenging and requires a combination of multiple antibiotics delivered over several months. [More]
Studies shed more light on relation between bacteria, immune system and antibiotics

Studies shed more light on relation between bacteria, immune system and antibiotics

Antibiotics and the immune system are the two forces that cope with bacterial infections. Now, two studies from Isabel Gordo's laboratory, at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, show for the first time that resistance to antibiotics and to the immune system is interconnected in bacteria. [More]
Researchers identify shingles as persistent risk factor for stroke

Researchers identify shingles as persistent risk factor for stroke

The study by researchers from the Department of Neurology at the University of Ulsan College of Medicine in Seoul showed that herpes zoster infection not only raised the risk of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke but also that of a transient ischaemic attack (TIA), a warning mini-stroke often preceding a full-blown stroke. [More]
Researchers develop computer model for speed analysis of TB's complex life-cycle

Researchers develop computer model for speed analysis of TB's complex life-cycle

Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a serious global health problem accounting for 1.3 million worldwide deaths annually. [More]
Excessive weight at young age increases risk of heart failure

Excessive weight at young age increases risk of heart failure

It comes down to starting healthy habits early. Fortunately, it's never too late to adopt a healthier lifestyle, and losing weight is great for reducing your risk of heart attack. But you can still be at a higher risk for other heart problems if you're late in changing your habits. [More]
Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB

Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine experts and colleagues in the United States and Africa have received an $11 million, five-year NIH grant to understand why some people living with HIV in Africa avoid becoming infected with the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB) despite exposure to high-TB-risk circumstances. [More]

Strengthening immune defence system may provide treatment alternative for tuberculosis

Researchers at Linköping University have made a discovery that could contribute to developing new vaccines and treatment alternatives for tuberculosis in the future. The results have been published in Scientific Reports, a sister journal to the highly respected periodical Nature. [More]

WHO violated sound standards of TB medical care, researchers say

The World Health Organization (WHO) violated sound standards of medical care and human rights by nudging poorer countries to follow less expensive, untested and largely ineffective treatment protocols for tuberculosis patients, a new paper by researchers at Duke, Brandeis and Harvard universities argues. [More]
New ultra-fast molecular method can help detect mycobacterial pathogens in the lungs

New ultra-fast molecular method can help detect mycobacterial pathogens in the lungs

What used to take several weeks is now possible in two days: Thanks to new molecular-based methods, mycobacterial pathogens that cause pulmonary infections or tuberculosis can now be detected much more quickly. [More]
Experts use next-generation genetic sequencing to diagnose suspected brain infections

Experts use next-generation genetic sequencing to diagnose suspected brain infections

In a proof-of-principle study, a team of physicians and bioinformatics experts at Johns Hopkins reports they were able to diagnose or rule out suspected brain infections using so called next-generation genetic sequencing of brain tissue samples. [More]
Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Firstly, a sample must be transported from the clinic to the laboratory. Simple tests may be undertaken in a small lab within the hospital or clinic, whilst complex testing such as drug susceptibility testing is often done in a large centralized laboratory many miles from the clinic [More]
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