Tuberculosis News and Research RSS Feed - Tuberculosis News and Research

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you think you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests as soon as possible. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.
Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease – an organization that explores the risks and best practices in infectious disease – is imploring global healthcare professionals and bodies to take a more active role in the growing problem of fungal resistance. [More]
Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid and FIND today unveiled the GeneXpert Omni, the world's most portable molecular diagnostics system enabling unprecedented access to accurate, fast and potentially life-saving diagnosis for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola in even the most remote areas of the world. [More]
UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health, with the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has entered into a multi-year affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology designed to deepen existing collaborative relationships, boost basic research of diseases of the immune system and more quickly introduce new clinical treatments and therapies. [More]
Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

A 20-year study by James Cook University scientists has found a strong link between diabetes and tuberculosis in tropical Australia. [More]
New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

Researchers from CalciMedica, Inc. and the University of Liverpool today announced the publication of a paper describing positive effects of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis. The paper, titled "Inhibitors of ORAI1 prevent cytosolic calcium-associated injury of human pancreatic acinar cells and acute pancreatitis in 3 mouse models" appears in the August edition of the journal Gastroenterology. [More]
MSU scientists suggest that common glaucoma medication could be used to treat TB

MSU scientists suggest that common glaucoma medication could be used to treat TB

A new discovery by Michigan State University scientists suggests that a common medication used to treat glaucoma could also be used to treat tuberculosis, even the drug-resistant kind. [More]
New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed new diagnostic criteria to enable clinicians to distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from those caused by fungal histoplasmosis infection. [More]
Researchers develop dynamic smart drug that targets site-specific inflammation

Researchers develop dynamic smart drug that targets site-specific inflammation

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and University of Colorado researchers have developed a dynamic "smart" drug that targets inflammation in a site-specific manner and could enhance the body's natural ability to fight infection and reduce side effects. [More]
Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. [More]
Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

A clinical study funded by the National Institutes of Health has found that young, single black women in South Africa adhered to a daily pill regimen to prevent HIV infection--an HIV prevention strategy known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP. This finding is the first strong indication that this population at substantial HIV risk could accept and reliably adhere to daily PrEP dosing. [More]
UK investment lacking for pneumonia research

UK investment lacking for pneumonia research

UK investment in pneumonia research is lacking when compared to spending on influenza and tuberculosis, according to a new study by the University of Southampton and University College London. [More]
New approach provides more complete picture of donor support for key global health issues

New approach provides more complete picture of donor support for key global health issues

As the world's leaders gather in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for the Financing for Development Conference, a study published in The Lancet demonstrates that a new approach is needed for classifying funding that reflects the function the funding serves, rather than the specific disease or country. The study is the first in-depth assessment of how donor funding is spent on global versus country-specific functions of health. [More]
Researchers discover role of RORC mutations in patients with candidiasis and mycobacteriosis

Researchers discover role of RORC mutations in patients with candidiasis and mycobacteriosis

The discovery of bi-allelic mutations in RORC in patients with candidiasis and mycobacteriosis revealed the pivotal role of RORC in mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and in systemic immunity to Mycobacterium in humans. [More]
Experts call for more spending on global health aids

Experts call for more spending on global health aids

As experts debate the slow response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and call for better international coordination, a new analysis estimates that $22 billion was spent on global health aid in 2013, yet only a fifth of this went toward such global imperatives as research on diseases that disproportionally affect the poor, outbreak preparedness and global health leadership. [More]
Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, or TB, improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. [More]
Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Results published today in The New England Journal of Medicine from a Janssen Research & Development, LLC (Janssen)-sponsored Phase 2b trial showed up to 86 percent of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis receiving guselkumab (CNTO 1959) achieved a Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) score of cleared psoriasis or minimal psoriasis at week 16, the study's primary endpoint. [More]
EPFL scientists identify lansoprazole as potential candidate against tuberculosis

EPFL scientists identify lansoprazole as potential candidate against tuberculosis

Testing thousands of approved drugs, EPFL scientists have identified an unlikely anti-tuberculosis drug: the over-the-counter antacid lansoprazole (Prevacid). [More]
Imaging proteasome complex helps show target site for potential cancer drugs

Imaging proteasome complex helps show target site for potential cancer drugs

Scientists have pioneered the use of a high-powered imaging technique to picture in exquisite detail one of the central proteins of life - a cellular recycling unit with a role in many diseases. [More]
Robert Hunter receives Harlan J. Spjut Award and Gold-Headed Cane Award

Robert Hunter receives Harlan J. Spjut Award and Gold-Headed Cane Award

Robert Hunter Jr., M.D., Ph.D., Distinguished Chair in Molecular Pathology and chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has received two prestigious awards. [More]
SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development has received a $2.9 million award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a new tuberculosis vaccine. [More]
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