Tuberculosis News and Research RSS Feed - Tuberculosis News and Research

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you think you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests as soon as possible. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.
ACP urges health professionals to speak out on mass deportation of immigrants

ACP urges health professionals to speak out on mass deportation of immigrants

The American College of Physicians (ACP) today called on physicians, individually and collectively, to speak out against proposals to deport the 12 million U.S. residents who lack documentation of legal residency status, citing the adverse impact that mass deportation would have on individual and the health of the public. [More]
Researchers find that humans carry more antibiotic-resistant staphylococci than farm animals

Researchers find that humans carry more antibiotic-resistant staphylococci than farm animals

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a concern for the health and well-being of both humans and farm animals. One of the most common and costly diseases faced by the dairy industry is bovine mastitis, a potentially fatal bacterial inflammation of the mammary gland (IMI). Widespread use of antibiotics to treat the disease is often blamed for generating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. [More]
Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira today announced that Inflectra (infliximab), the first monoclonal antibody (mAb) biosimilar therapy, has been registered in Australia. This registration paves the way for the Federal Government to reduce the cost of some of the most expensive medicines on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). [More]
MRI scanners can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to exact target sites in the body

MRI scanners can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to exact target sites in the body

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered MRI scanners, normally used to produce images, can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to specific target sites in the body. [More]
E-cigarettes becoming more widely available in developing countries

E-cigarettes becoming more widely available in developing countries

Most of the debate around e-cigarettes has focused on the developed world, but the devices are becoming more widely available in some low- and middle-income countries, where there is even greater potential for impact on public health, say two Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Researchers identify potential drug target to fight TB

Researchers identify potential drug target to fight TB

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved the first new drug to fight tuberculosis (TB) in more than 40 years, but treatment still takes six months, 200 pills and leaves 40 percent of patients uncured. Thus, new targets are needed. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers report they have identified one such target -- a gene that allows the disease to camp out in human immune cells, and is thus essential for the organism's proliferation. [More]
Alere supports DTHF’s Tutu Teen Truck project to expand reach of infectious services for youth

Alere supports DTHF’s Tutu Teen Truck project to expand reach of infectious services for youth

Alere Inc. (NYSE: ALR), a global leader in rapid diagnostics, today announced a grant of 2.5 million South African Rand to support the work of the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation (DTHF), a Cape Town-based organization under the patronage of Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu. [More]
Scientific consensus paper highlights health benefits of UV exposure and vitamin D

Scientific consensus paper highlights health benefits of UV exposure and vitamin D

The Journal of the American College of Nutrition is pleased to offer Open Access to a scientific consensus paper, Sunlight and Vitamin D: Necessary for Public Health, authored by scientists from the University of California, San Diego, Creighton University, Boston University Medical Center, and the Medical University of South Carolina, along with other research contributors. [More]
Researchers awarded NIH grant to revolutionize TB treatment

Researchers awarded NIH grant to revolutionize TB treatment

Stop Jeff North, Ph.D., if you've heard this one before: an indole-based drug and a tuberculosis protein meet in a laboratory. There's a brief interaction, then the drug skates merrily away while the protein is nowhere to be found. [More]
Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease – an organization that explores the risks and best practices in infectious disease – is imploring global healthcare professionals and bodies to take a more active role in the growing problem of fungal resistance. [More]
Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid and FIND today unveiled the GeneXpert Omni, the world's most portable molecular diagnostics system enabling unprecedented access to accurate, fast and potentially life-saving diagnosis for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola in even the most remote areas of the world. [More]
UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health, with the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has entered into a multi-year affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology designed to deepen existing collaborative relationships, boost basic research of diseases of the immune system and more quickly introduce new clinical treatments and therapies. [More]
Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

A 20-year study by James Cook University scientists has found a strong link between diabetes and tuberculosis in tropical Australia. [More]
New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

Researchers from CalciMedica, Inc. and the University of Liverpool today announced the publication of a paper describing positive effects of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis. The paper, titled "Inhibitors of ORAI1 prevent cytosolic calcium-associated injury of human pancreatic acinar cells and acute pancreatitis in 3 mouse models" appears in the August edition of the journal Gastroenterology. [More]
MSU scientists suggest that common glaucoma medication could be used to treat TB

MSU scientists suggest that common glaucoma medication could be used to treat TB

A new discovery by Michigan State University scientists suggests that a common medication used to treat glaucoma could also be used to treat tuberculosis, even the drug-resistant kind. [More]
New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed new diagnostic criteria to enable clinicians to distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from those caused by fungal histoplasmosis infection. [More]
Researchers develop dynamic smart drug that targets site-specific inflammation

Researchers develop dynamic smart drug that targets site-specific inflammation

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and University of Colorado researchers have developed a dynamic "smart" drug that targets inflammation in a site-specific manner and could enhance the body's natural ability to fight infection and reduce side effects. [More]
Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. [More]
Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

A clinical study funded by the National Institutes of Health has found that young, single black women in South Africa adhered to a daily pill regimen to prevent HIV infection--an HIV prevention strategy known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP. This finding is the first strong indication that this population at substantial HIV risk could accept and reliably adhere to daily PrEP dosing. [More]
UK investment lacking for pneumonia research

UK investment lacking for pneumonia research

UK investment in pneumonia research is lacking when compared to spending on influenza and tuberculosis, according to a new study by the University of Southampton and University College London. [More]
Advertisement