Type 2 Diabetes News and Research RSS Feed - Type 2 Diabetes News and Research

Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset or noninsulindependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. People can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which fat, muscle, and liver cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. People who are overweight and inactive are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Treatment includes taking diabetes medicines, making wise food choices, exercising regularly, controlling blood pressure and cholesterol, and taking aspirin daily—for some.
Autophagy prevents accumulation of toxic proteins associated with type 2 diabetes

Autophagy prevents accumulation of toxic proteins associated with type 2 diabetes

People with Type 2 diabetes have an excess of a protein called islet amyloid polypeptide, or IAPP, and the accumulation of this protein is linked to the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. [More]
Blacks with depression and diabetes receive inadequate mental health treatment

Blacks with depression and diabetes receive inadequate mental health treatment

A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment. [More]
Researchers recommend low carbohydrate diet for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

Researchers recommend low carbohydrate diet for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

A new study involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and other institutions says patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes should eat a diet low in carbohydrates. [More]
BP variability may be ‘CV risk integrator’

BP variability may be ‘CV risk integrator’

Increased variability in blood pressure may be an indicator of overall cardiovascular risk rather than being a risk factor per se, suggest researchers. [More]
Enhancing autophagy in pre-diabetic patients has potential to prevent onset of diabetes

Enhancing autophagy in pre-diabetic patients has potential to prevent onset of diabetes

Diabetes affects almost 400 million people worldwide. One of the hallmarks of this disease is a loss of pancreatic β cells, which secrete insulin. In many patients the reduction of β cells is associated an accumulation of a toxic form of a protein produced by β cells, known as islet amyloid polypeptide. [More]
New book addresses safe and effective exercises for overweight children

New book addresses safe and effective exercises for overweight children

Safe and Effective Exercise for Overweight Youth by Melinda Sothern, PhD, Director of Behavioral & Community Health Sciences and Professor of Research at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, provides exercise recommendations and guidelines specifically designed for overweight youth. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability among people with Type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

In mice with diet-induced diabetes—the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans—a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. [More]
JRC publishes first comprehensive report on school food policies in Europe

JRC publishes first comprehensive report on school food policies in Europe

As part of the European Commission's efforts to help reduce childhood obesity, the Commission's in-house science service, the Joint Research Centre (JRC), has published the first comprehensive report on school food policies in Europe. [More]
Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai Heart at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has been awarded a $3.8 million grant by the American Heart Association to promote cardiovascular health among high-risk New York City children, and their parents, living in Harlem and the Bronx. With assistance from the NYC Administration for Children's Services, the research team's mission is to reduce each child's future risk of obesity, heart attack, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Johnson & Johnson sales increase 9.1% to $19.5 billion in second quarter 2014

Johnson & Johnson sales increase 9.1% to $19.5 billion in second quarter 2014

Johnson & Johnson today announced sales of $19.5 billion for the second quarter of 2014, an increase of 9.1% as compared to the second quarter of 2013. Operational results increased 9.4% and the negative impact of currency was 0.3%. [More]
Labelling people as pre-diabetic is drastically premature measure with no medical value

Labelling people as pre-diabetic is drastically premature measure with no medical value

Labelling people with moderately high blood sugar as pre-diabetic is a drastically premature measure with no medical value and huge financial and social costs, say researchers from UCL and the Mayo Clinic, Minnesota. [More]
Physical fitness may buffer some of adverse health effects of too much sitting

Physical fitness may buffer some of adverse health effects of too much sitting

Physical fitness may buffer some of the adverse health effects of too much sitting, according to a new study by researchers from the American Cancer Society, The Cooper Institute, and the University of Texas. [More]
Improving type 2 diabetes management: an interview with Sir Michael Hirst, President of the International Diabetes Federation

Improving type 2 diabetes management: an interview with Sir Michael Hirst, President of the International Diabetes Federation

One study suggested that 42 percent of people with type 2 diabetes who are treated for the disease do not reach their blood sugar goals, putting them at higher risk of organ and tissue damage, blindness and even death. We wanted to explore potential causes of clinical inertia among physicians and people with diabetes, which may lead to sub-optimal care. [More]
2D IR spectroscopy reveals intermediate structure during amylin aggregation pathway

2D IR spectroscopy reveals intermediate structure during amylin aggregation pathway

Amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, cataracts, and the spongiform encephalopathies, all share the common trait that proteins aggregate into long fibers which then form plaques. [More]
Keck Medicine of USC study identifies potential therapeutic target for inflammation

Keck Medicine of USC study identifies potential therapeutic target for inflammation

Molecular microbiologists from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California have discovered that mice lacking a specific component of the immune system are completely resistant to sepsis, a potentially fatal complication of infection. [More]
Acetone in breath is suitable marker of fat-burning during physical activity

Acetone in breath is suitable marker of fat-burning during physical activity

Physicists at Radboud University Nijmegen have shown for the first time that the concentration of acetone in breath is a suitable marker of fat-burning during physical activity. [More]

Trauma device and reconstructive joint implant market in Latin America expected to reach $1.75 billion by 2022

Decision Resources Group finds that the market for trauma devices and reconstructive joint implants in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico will be driven by favorable demographics, high numbers of motor vehicle accidents and improving access to health care, which will allow more patients to undergo these procedures. [More]
Research on intestinal microbiota overturns vision of human gut ecosystem

Research on intestinal microbiota overturns vision of human gut ecosystem

An international research team within the MetaHIT consortium coordinated by INRA and involving teams from CEA, CNRS and Université d'Evry, has developed a new method to analyse the global genome, or the metagenome of the intestinal microbiota. [More]
Researchers map unknown microorganisms in human intestinal flora

Researchers map unknown microorganisms in human intestinal flora

Researchers from DTU Systems Biology have mapped 500 previously unknown microorganisms in human intestinal flora as well as 800 also unknown bacterial viruses (also called bacteriophages) which attack intestinal bacteria. [More]