Type 2 Diabetes News and Research RSS Feed - Type 2 Diabetes News and Research

Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset or noninsulindependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. People can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which fat, muscle, and liver cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. People who are overweight and inactive are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Treatment includes taking diabetes medicines, making wise food choices, exercising regularly, controlling blood pressure and cholesterol, and taking aspirin daily—for some.
Researchers discover protein that may open door to new method of treating type 2 diabetes

Researchers discover protein that may open door to new method of treating type 2 diabetes

The STK25 protein contributes to cell growth. Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy have discovered that the protein also affects metabolism, demonstrating that elevated levels accelerate the progress of diabetes in mice. [More]
Coffee increases risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension

Coffee increases risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension

Coffee increases the risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension who are slow caffeine metabolisers, according to results from the HARVEST study presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos from Italy. People who drank more than three cups of coffee per day doubled their risk of prediabetes. [More]
Bariatric surgery can provide valuable benefits to the brain

Bariatric surgery can provide valuable benefits to the brain

At bariatric facilities like Dr. Feiz and Associates, the life-changing benefits of bariatric surgery, including reduced risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and endocrine disorders are well established. [More]
Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

In a comprehensive review of recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies of diabetes and nutrition, Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard School of Public Health investigators have identified specific foods and dietary patterns that are beneficial in preventing and controlling diabetes. [More]
Lifestyle intervention shows kidney benefits in diabetic patients

Lifestyle intervention shows kidney benefits in diabetic patients

A lifestyle intervention focused on weight loss and increasing physical activity should be considered as additional treatment to prevent advanced kidney disease in overweight or obese people with Type 2 diabetes, say researchers. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-APOCIIIRx Phase 3 study in FCS patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-APOCIIIRx Phase 3 study in FCS patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced the initiation of a Phase 3 study evaluating ISIS-APOCIIIRx in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS). FCS is a rare orphan disease, characterized by extremely high triglyceride levels, that affects an estimated 3,000 to 5,000 patients worldwide. [More]
Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets now available in U.S. for people with diabetes

Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets now available in U.S. for people with diabetes

Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets are now available by prescription in pharmacies across the United States, including Walgreens, Rite Aid, Kroger and many other leading chain and independent retailers, according to Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a crucial link between high levels of insulin and pathways that lead to obesity, a finding that may have important implications when treating diabetes. [More]
Malaysia set to become the new healthcare investor destination, says Frost & Sullivan

Malaysia set to become the new healthcare investor destination, says Frost & Sullivan

Malaysia is turning out to be the new healthcare investor destination as a proactive government and burgeoning aging population fuel the demand for healthcare services. [More]
Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes-alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures-in children with Crohn's disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. [More]
Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Here are highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. [More]
Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

African American women born at a low or very low birth weight may be at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The findings, which appear in Diabetes Care, may explain in part the higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes in African American populations, which has a high prevalence of low birth weight. [More]
Losing weight: A big money-saver for individuals with Type 2 diabetes

Losing weight: A big money-saver for individuals with Type 2 diabetes

Overweight individuals with diabetes who lose weight by dieting and increasing their physical activity can reduce their health care costs by an average of more than $500 per year, according to a new study. [More]
Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

The most common form of diabetes is sometimes referred to as metabolic diabetes, which is the diabetes most people are very familiar with, type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes is most prevalent in people that are overweight or obese. Historically, it has been confined to adults or older patients but it has been on the rise as the global obesity problem has continued to worsen. [More]
KalVista begins Phase I trial of novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor for treatment of DME

KalVista begins Phase I trial of novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor for treatment of DME

KalVista Pharmaceuticals, an ophthalmology company with a focus on diabetic macular edema (DME), today announces that it has begun a Phase I, First in Human, trial of its novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor, KVD001, for the treatment of DME. [More]
Study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age

Study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age

As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, and tend to awaken too early in the morning. [More]
Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim's Basaglar (insulin glargine injection) gets FDA's tentative approval

Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim's Basaglar (insulin glargine injection) gets FDA's tentative approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted tentative approval for Basaglar (insulin glargine injection), which is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes and in combination with mealtime insulin in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. [More]
Study on patients with type 2 diabetes examines fracture risk with antihypertensive treatment

Study on patients with type 2 diabetes examines fracture risk with antihypertensive treatment

It's time to question the common belief that patients receiving intensive blood pressure treatment are prone to falling and breaking bones. A comprehensive study in people ages 40 to 79 with diabetes, led by Karen Margolis, MD, of HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research in the US, found no evidence supporting this belief. [More]
New cholesterol guidelines can significantly help reduce cardiovascular events

New cholesterol guidelines can significantly help reduce cardiovascular events

A study from UT-Southwestern researchers found that recently introduced cholesterol guidelines would significantly reduce new cardiovascular events, when compared to treatment based on previous cholesterol guidelines. [More]
Meta-analysis shows blood pressure variability and mortality link

Meta-analysis shows blood pressure variability and mortality link

A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies investigating the link between visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease or all-cause mortality has revealed a modest, but significant, association. [More]