Type 2 Diabetes News and Research RSS Feed - Type 2 Diabetes News and Research

Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset or noninsulindependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. People can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which fat, muscle, and liver cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. People who are overweight and inactive are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Treatment includes taking diabetes medicines, making wise food choices, exercising regularly, controlling blood pressure and cholesterol, and taking aspirin daily—for some.
Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Impaired activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the presence of glucose has been demonstrated in pancreatic beta-cells from patients with type 2 diabetes. The cause of this dysfunction has been unknown. Publishing online in Endocrinology, Buck Institute assistant research professor Akos Gerencser, PhD, shows that in patients with type 2 diabetes the balance between supply and demand of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) is altered causing a decrease in the signaling that turns on insulin secretion. [More]
NEJM publishes positive clinical results from Phase 2 clinical study of volanesorsen

NEJM publishes positive clinical results from Phase 2 clinical study of volanesorsen

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the leader in RNA-targeted therapeutics, and Akcea Therapeutics, its wholly owned subsidiary, announced today that The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has published positive clinical results from a Phase 2 clinical study evaluating volanesorsen (formerly ISIS-APOCIII Rx) in patients with very high to severely high triglycerides. [More]
LixiLan-O Phase III clinical trial meets primary endpoint in patients with type 2 diabetes

LixiLan-O Phase III clinical trial meets primary endpoint in patients with type 2 diabetes

Sanofi announced today that the LixiLan-O Phase III clinical trial met its primary objective in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin. The fixed-ratio combination of insulin glargine 100 units/mL and lixisenatide, a GLP-1 RA, demonstrated statistically superior reduction in HbA1c (average blood glucose over the previous three months) compared with lixisenatide and compared with insulin glargine 100 units/mL. [More]
IOF, EOS to jointly hold Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting in Abu Dhabi

IOF, EOS to jointly hold Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting in Abu Dhabi

With a growing senior population and an increase in unhealthy lifestyles, the prevalence of osteoporosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is soaring in the Middle East and North African region. In response to the dramatic increase in these diseases within the region the International Osteoporosis Foundation, in cooperation with the Emirates Osteoporosis Society, will be holding the 3rd Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting from December 5-7, 2015 in Abu Dhabi. [More]
New study estimates link between coffee consumption habits and incidence of mild cognitive impairment

New study estimates link between coffee consumption habits and incidence of mild cognitive impairment

A new study by researchers at the University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, Geriatric Unit & Laboratory of Gerontology and Geriatrics, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, Italy, and Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Italy, estimates the association between change or constant habits in coffee consumption and the incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), evaluating 1,445 individuals recruited from 5,632 subjects, aged 65-84 year old, from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging (ILSA), a population-based sample from eight Italian municipalities with a 3.5-year median follow-up. [More]
New study to explore mechanisms responsible for taste changes following RYGB, diet-induced obesity

New study to explore mechanisms responsible for taste changes following RYGB, diet-induced obesity

Currently, one of the most effective surgical methods for treating obesity is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, which limits the amount of food and drink that can be ingested at one time and the amount of calories and nutrients absorbed through the intestinal tract. An unintended side effect of RYGB is that it reduces the patient's taste for sweet and fatty foods—but there is no scientific explanation for why these taste changes occur. [More]
New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

The fact that obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers is well known. But a new Iowa State University study adds to the growing evidence that memory loss should also be a top concern. [More]
Scientists develop exercise mimic molecule that could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

Scientists develop exercise mimic molecule that could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a molecule that acts as an exercise mimic, which could potentially help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity. [More]
Regular exercise, healthy diet may help reduce knee pain for overweight adults with diabetes

Regular exercise, healthy diet may help reduce knee pain for overweight adults with diabetes

Knee pain in older adults, often caused by osteoarthritis, usually means more visits to the doctor and also can be a harbinger of disability. [More]
Study examines link between use of diabetes drug pioglitazone and increased risk of bladder cancer

Study examines link between use of diabetes drug pioglitazone and increased risk of bladder cancer

Although some previous studies have suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with use of the diabetes drug pioglitazone, analyses that included nearly 200,000 patients found no statistically significant increased risk, however a small increased risk could not be excluded, according to a study in the July 21 issue of JAMA. [More]
Losing single night of sleep could alter genes that control biological clocks in cells

Losing single night of sleep could alter genes that control biological clocks in cells

Swedish researchers at Uppsala University and the Karolinska Institute have found that genes that control the biological clocks in cells throughout the body are altered after losing a single night of sleep, in a study that is to be published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. [More]
New approach holds great promise for developing effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases

New approach holds great promise for developing effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases

Using existing drugs, such as lithium, to restore basic biological processes in human cells and animal models, researchers may have broken a long-standing logjam in devising effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find potential therapy to treat diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

UT Southwestern researchers find potential therapy to treat diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Reducing high concentrations of a fatty molecule that is commonly found in people with diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease rapidly improves insulin sensitivity, UT Southwestern Medical Center diabetes researchers have found. [More]
Type 2 diabetes patients with specific genetic markers at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Type 2 diabetes patients with specific genetic markers at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Certain patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) may have specific genetic risk factors that put them at higher risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published recently in Molecular Aspects of Medicine. [More]
Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Like most health professionals, David Olson has known for some time of the dangers posed by excessive stress. His latest research, though, is giving surprising new insight into how chronic stress in childhood can have an impact years after it occurred in women giving birth. [More]
New research suggests that tax on sugary drinks could help fight obesity

New research suggests that tax on sugary drinks could help fight obesity

A tax on sugary drinks that depends on the number of calories or amount of sugar per liter could help fight obesity, suggests new research published in Social Science & Medicine. While a few countries are already trialing a tax on sugary drinks, taxing the dose would encourage drinks companies to offer low-calorie alternatives. [More]
Loss of dietary diversity contributes to rise in obesity, Type 2 diabetes and other diseases

Loss of dietary diversity contributes to rise in obesity, Type 2 diabetes and other diseases

A loss of dietary diversity during the past 50 years could be a contributing factor to the rise in obesity, Type 2 diabetes, gastrointestinal problems and other diseases, according to a lecture by Mark Heiman, vice president and chief scientific officer at MicroBiome Therapeutics, at IFT15: Where Science Feeds Innovation hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists in Chicago. [More]
Study: Breast cancer survivors experience post-treatment weight gain compared with cancer-free peers

Study: Breast cancer survivors experience post-treatment weight gain compared with cancer-free peers

Among women with a family history of breast cancer, those diagnosed with breast cancer gained weight at a greater rate compared with cancer-free women of the same age and menopausal status. [More]
Diabetes drug metformin can also treat portal hypertension

Diabetes drug metformin can also treat portal hypertension

The diabetes drug metformin continues to expand beyond its treatment for type 2 diabetes. In addition to its potential use in treating age-related health problems, metformin can treat portal hypertension—high blood pressure in the liver resulting from cirrhosis, according to a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. [More]
New drug patiromer could improve potassium levels of patients with diabetic kidney disease

New drug patiromer could improve potassium levels of patients with diabetic kidney disease

Among patients with diabetic kidney disease and hyperkalemia (elevated potassium levels in the blood), a potentially life-threatening condition, those who received the new drug patiromer, twice daily for four weeks, had significant decreases in potassium levels which lasted through one year, according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
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