Type 2 Diabetes News and Research RSS Feed - Type 2 Diabetes News and Research

Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset or noninsulindependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. People can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which fat, muscle, and liver cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. People who are overweight and inactive are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Treatment includes taking diabetes medicines, making wise food choices, exercising regularly, controlling blood pressure and cholesterol, and taking aspirin daily—for some.
New Iowa State study shows that people with gym membership exercise more

New Iowa State study shows that people with gym membership exercise more

If your New Year's resolution was to exercise more in 2017, chances are you've already given up or you're on the verge of doing so. To reach your goal, you may want to consider joining a gym, based on the results of a new study from a team of Iowa State University researchers. [More]
Scientists generate new index to accurately predict presence of fatty liver disease

Scientists generate new index to accurately predict presence of fatty liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become a global epidemic. There is not only a great interest worldwide to understand the causes and consequences of fatty liver disease, but also to diagnose fatty liver disease at an early stage. [More]
New study shows outcomes after obesity surgery in teenagers

New study shows outcomes after obesity surgery in teenagers

Obesity surgery has proven to be just as effective for teenagers as for adults. Five years on, those who underwent the procedure as teenagers weighed, on average, 28 percent less than prior to the surgery. [More]
Type 1 diabetes patients show distinct signs of gut inflammation, study reveals

Type 1 diabetes patients show distinct signs of gut inflammation, study reveals

People with Type 1 diabetes exhibit inflammation in the digestive tract and gut bacteria¬—a pattern that differs from individuals who do not have diabetes or those who have celiac disease, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
FishTaco method pinpoints bacterial species responsible for each functional imbalance in microbiome

FishTaco method pinpoints bacterial species responsible for each functional imbalance in microbiome

A growing body of evidence indicates that the trillions of microbes that live on and inside our bodies affect our health. Collectively, these resident microbes form our microbiome. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new method to enhance drug discovery and protein research

TSRI scientists develop new method to enhance drug discovery and protein research

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has developed a versatile new method that should enhance the discovery of new drugs and the study of proteins. [More]
Brief waiting room interaction could prompt increased fruit and vegetable consumption among families

Brief waiting room interaction could prompt increased fruit and vegetable consumption among families

Low-income families were more likely to use their federal food assistance on nutritious food after learning that their dollars can be doubled for more fruits and vegetables, a new study finds. [More]
Scientists developing painless ‘smart’ patch that releases insulin in response to rising glucose levels

Scientists developing painless ‘smart’ patch that releases insulin in response to rising glucose levels

Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. [More]
Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which the stress hormone FGF21 keeps digestive enzymes from damaging the pancreas. [More]
People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. [More]
Every meal triggers short-term inflammatory responses in healthy individuals

Every meal triggers short-term inflammatory responses in healthy individuals

When we eat, we do not just take in nutrients - we also consume a significant quantity of bacteria. The body is faced with the challenge of simultaneously distributing the ingested glucose and fighting these bacteria. [More]
People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are taken out of the equation, according to an analysis by researchers from King's College London. [More]
Resistance-based interval training can improve blood vessel function, study shows

Resistance-based interval training can improve blood vessel function, study shows

Just one session of interval weight-training can improve the risk of Type 2 diabetes complications, according to a UBC Okanagan study. This is encouraging news for those starting the New Year with good intentions. [More]
Childhood obesity starts in the womb?

Childhood obesity starts in the womb?

There is incontrovertible evidence that some harmful drugs and toxins can affect lifelong health. For example, if women take certain drugs in pregnancy, such as thalidomide, there are well documented effects on lifelong health. These have obvious and dramatic effects on the child... [More]
UT researchers developing cheap, portable device for detecting diabetes at early stage

UT researchers developing cheap, portable device for detecting diabetes at early stage

Researchers at the University of Twente, in cooperation with commercial parties, are developing a portable device for detecting type 1 or type 2 diabetes at an early stage. [More]
SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

Have you already faltered on your New Year's resolution to exercise regularly in 2017? Joined a gym, but only worked out two days so far? New workout gear still neatly folded with tags attached? Don't give up your admirable ambition just yet. Instead, consider a new attitude to refocus your approach toward your exercise goal. [More]
Epigenetic changes favor development of fatty liver in humans and mice

Epigenetic changes favor development of fatty liver in humans and mice

Mice with a strong tendency to obesity already exhibit epigenetic changes at six weeks of age, inducing the liver to amplify its production of the enzyme DPP4 and release it into the circulation. Over the long term, this favors the development of a fatty liver. [More]
Study finds new link between short sleep during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus

Study finds new link between short sleep during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus

A Singapore-based study has found a new health link between short sleep during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). [More]
Why WAIT program offers new hope to obese patients with diabetes

Why WAIT program offers new hope to obese patients with diabetes

Joslin Diabetes Center's intensive life-style intervention program for obese patients with diabetes continues to offer health benefits for participants five years after they begin the intervention, a new study demonstrates. [More]
Researchers uncover reason for stent failure in diabetic patients with clogged arteries

Researchers uncover reason for stent failure in diabetic patients with clogged arteries

People with any form of diabetes are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular conditions than people without the disease. Moreover, if they undergo an operation to open up a clogged artery by inserting a "stent" surgical tube, the artery is much more likely to clog up again. [More]
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