Type 2 Diabetes News and Research RSS Feed - Type 2 Diabetes News and Research

Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset or noninsulindependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. People can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which fat, muscle, and liver cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. People who are overweight and inactive are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Treatment includes taking diabetes medicines, making wise food choices, exercising regularly, controlling blood pressure and cholesterol, and taking aspirin daily—for some.
Researchers develop new drugs for melanoma

Researchers develop new drugs for melanoma

Finding new, more effective and personalised treatments for cancer is the challenge of many researchers. A challenge that has been successfully met by a team from Inserm led by Stéphane Rocchi, which has just synthesised and developed new drugs for melanoma. [More]
NR supplements can reduce diabetes-related complications in mice

NR supplements can reduce diabetes-related complications in mice

A naturally occurring vitamin, nicotinamide riboside (NR), can lower blood sugar levels, reduce fatty liver, and prevent peripheral nerve damage in mouse models of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a new study by researchers at the University of Iowa and the Iowa City VA Health Care System. [More]
Diabetes societies endorse 'metabolic surgery'

Diabetes societies endorse 'metabolic surgery'

An "unprecedented" number of societies have endorsed guidelines recommending metabolic surgery for patients with diabetes - and not just for patients with severe obesity. [More]
Clinical study supports safety, efficacy of GI Windows’ IAS as treatment option for Type 2 diabetes

Clinical study supports safety, efficacy of GI Windows’ IAS as treatment option for Type 2 diabetes

GI Windows, Inc., a clinical-stage medical device company, today announced the presentation of six-month results of the first-ever clinical study evaluating the endoscopic creation of a dual-path enteral diversion using the company’s Incision-less Anastomosis System (IAS) at Digestive Disease Week® 2016 (DDW), in San Diego, Calif. [More]
Microvascular disease burden tied to CVD outcomes in diabetic patients

Microvascular disease burden tied to CVD outcomes in diabetic patients

The risk of cardiovascular disease events in patients with Type 2 diabetes rises in line with their cumulative burden of microvascular disease, research shows. [More]
Researchers find genetic mutations linked to increased risk factor for PTSD

Researchers find genetic mutations linked to increased risk factor for PTSD

In the largest study of DNA samples from service members with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), researchers have identified genetic mutations that may be associated with an increased risk factor for PTSD. [More]
Personalized DXM-loaded leukosomes may help treat inflammation

Personalized DXM-loaded leukosomes may help treat inflammation

Nanosized Trojan horses created from a patient's own immune cells have successfully treated inflammation by overcoming the body's complex defense mechanisms, perhaps leading to broader applications for treating diseases characterized by inflammation, such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Aliskiren fails to show benefit for heart failure patients with diabetes

Aliskiren fails to show benefit for heart failure patients with diabetes

A subgroup analysis in heart failure patients with diabetes from the ATMOSPHERE trial has failed to show benefit and signals the end of the road for aliskiren in heart failure. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

A new study from a group of international researchers has identified a potentially effective tool to reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity—aerobic exercise. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
Cardioprotective effect proposed for metformin

Cardioprotective effect proposed for metformin

A large retrospective analysis suggests that metformin could be cardioprotective in insulin-dependent patients with Type 2 diabetes. [More]
SPRINT supports stringent BP goals for elderly

SPRINT supports stringent BP goals for elderly

Analysis of SPRINT participants older than 75 years shows that they too benefitted from an intensive blood pressure target of 120 mmHg. [More]
Researchers identify single RCAN1 gene responsible for onset of type 2 diabetes

Researchers identify single RCAN1 gene responsible for onset of type 2 diabetes

RESEARCHERS have identified the gene they believe is responsible for the onset of type 2 diabetes, sparking hope for treatments to prevent and possibly reverse the progressive condition. [More]
PYY hormone may offer effective treatment for type 2 diabetes

PYY hormone may offer effective treatment for type 2 diabetes

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Oxford University have found a hormone that may offer an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes. [More]
THADA gene plays prominent role in transfer of heredity type 2 diabetes from mother to child

THADA gene plays prominent role in transfer of heredity type 2 diabetes from mother to child

Research from Lund University in Sweden can explain why type 2 diabetes is inherited to a greater extent from an individual's mother. The heredity of a previously known risk gene, THADA, has proven to be dominant if it comes from the mother, whereas it has little or no effect on the child's risk of disease if it originates from the father. [More]
World Hypertension Day: AMA joins hands with AHA to increase public awareness of hypertension

World Hypertension Day: AMA joins hands with AHA to increase public awareness of hypertension

With the number of deaths caused by high blood pressure on the rise in the United States, the American Medical Association is joining the American Heart Association to increase public awareness of this “silent killer.” [More]
Exposure to BBP can make babies obese even before they are born

Exposure to BBP can make babies obese even before they are born

Benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), a chemical commonly used in the food manufacturing process, can increase fat stores in the body even before we're born, according to a new study published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology. [More]
Consuming sesame-based ingredients may reduce oxidative stress

Consuming sesame-based ingredients may reduce oxidative stress

The antioxidant boosting properties of sesame, and especially sesame oil, can have a significant effect on oxidative stress, improving human health, according to a systematic review published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Model may guide statin treatment in diabetes patients

Model may guide statin treatment in diabetes patients

Researchers have developed a model to predict the benefits of statin treatment in individual patients with Type 2 diabetes, but experts question whether individualised treatment is always the best choice. [More]
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