Typhoid Fever News and Research RSS Feed - Typhoid Fever News and Research

Typhoid fever is a life-threatening illness caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi. In the United States about 400 cases occur each year, and 75% of these are acquired while traveling internationally. Typhoid fever is still common in the developing world, where it affects about 21.5 million persons each year.

Typhoid fever can be prevented and can usually be treated with antibiotics. If you are planning to travel outside the United States, you should know about typhoid fever and what steps you can take to protect yourself.
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
Emergence of multidrug-resistant salmonella strains increases burden of neglected diseases in Africa

Emergence of multidrug-resistant salmonella strains increases burden of neglected diseases in Africa

"The affected countries will have a major problem if we do not manage to control salmonella bloodstream infections with new antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin," cautions Prof Jürgen May. [More]
Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Once inside the human body, infectious microbes like Salmonella face a fluid situation. They live in a watery world, surrounded by liquid continually flowing over and abrading their cell surfaces--a property known as fluid shear. [More]
Scientists evaluate phage-based therapy to battle antibiotic-resistant bacterial superbug infections

Scientists evaluate phage-based therapy to battle antibiotic-resistant bacterial superbug infections

Flinders University scientists are looking to bacteriophages – highly specific viruses - as the as the best way to attack antibiotic-resistant bacterial superbug infections. [More]
MGH researchers identify how Shigella injects proteins into target host cells

MGH researchers identify how Shigella injects proteins into target host cells

Researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases are investigating the mechanism by which several important pathogenic species of bacteria deliver proteins into the cells of the organisms they are infecting. [More]
UIC researchers discover molecular switch that allows salmonella bacteria to fight immune system

UIC researchers discover molecular switch that allows salmonella bacteria to fight immune system

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered a molecular regulator that allows salmonella bacteria to switch from actively causing disease to lurking in a chronic but asymptomatic state called a biofilm. [More]
Bacteriophage-based method may improve efficiency of bacteria detectors

Bacteriophage-based method may improve efficiency of bacteria detectors

Viruses that attack bacteria - bacteriophages - can be fussy: they only inject their genetic material into the bacteria that suit them. The fussiness of bacteriophages can be exploited in order to detect specific species of bacteria. Scientists from Warsaw have just demonstrated that bacteriophage-based biosensors will be much more efficient if prior to the deposition on the surface of the bacteriophage sensor their orientation is ordered in electric field. [More]
Deaths from avoidable risk factors: an interview with Dr Ali Mokdad, IHME

Deaths from avoidable risk factors: an interview with Dr Ali Mokdad, IHME

The study showed that about thirty percent to maybe half of the leading causes of death in the world are preventable. These are risk factors that you could manage and thus you could prevent a lot of premature deaths. [More]
Infections experienced in childhood may lead to premature ACS or heart attacks

Infections experienced in childhood may lead to premature ACS or heart attacks

"Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer worldwide, including in Indonesia where it accounts for 31.9% of all deaths," said Dr Qanitha. "CVD risk factors are rising rapidly in South-East Asia, particularly in young people. Most Indonesian CVD patients are under 56 years old and still economically productive. This very young CVD onset raises the question of whether local circumstances may play a role." [More]
Invasive Salmonella infections revealed as major cause of child illness and deaths in Africa

Invasive Salmonella infections revealed as major cause of child illness and deaths in Africa

Invasive Salmonella infections in sub-Saharan Africa are a major cause of child illness and deaths, a new body of research into this usually overlooked infectious disease has revealed. [More]
Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health, in partnership with vaccine manufacturer PaxVax, Inc. is participating in a clinical study to test the effects of the oral typhoid vaccination, Vivotif (Typhoid Vaccine Live Oral Ty21a). The study will look at the side effects that could occur when taking Vivotif across the range of approved potencies. [More]
Liverpool scientists complete genomics studies on multidrug resistant Typhoid fever in Africa

Liverpool scientists complete genomics studies on multidrug resistant Typhoid fever in Africa

The team has completed two genomics studies on the tropical disease, a condition that is estimated to cause up to 30 million illnesses and over a quarter of a million deaths globally each year. [More]
Antigens and antibodies for an optimised ELISA test kit for Ebola

Antigens and antibodies for an optimised ELISA test kit for Ebola

AMSBIO has announced several products suitable for the development of an ELISA detection assay for the Ebola virus. [More]
Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Planning to travel outside the U.S. this holiday season? Check with your primary care provider or travel clinic when you book your flight. [More]
Health tips for global travellers

Health tips for global travellers

Nothing ruins a summer vacation faster than getting sick. "Remember that most diseases are transmitted by food, water and insects," says John A. Sellick, Jr., DO, University at Buffalo associate professor of medicine and hospital epidemiologist at Veterans Affairs Western New York Healthcare System. "So get vaccinated, keep insects off you as much as possible and be careful with what you put in your mouth." [More]
Researchers uncover how typhoid pathogen manages to evade host's immune system

Researchers uncover how typhoid pathogen manages to evade host's immune system

The life-threatening disease typhoid fever results from the ongoing battle between the bacterial pathogen Salmonella and the immune cells of the body. Prof. Dirk Bumann's research group at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has now uncovered how the typhoid pathogen repeatedly manages to evade the host's immune system. Their findings are published in the scientific journal "Cell Host & Microbe". [More]
Scientists progress towards understanding how some bacterial cells escape being killed by antibiotics

Scientists progress towards understanding how some bacterial cells escape being killed by antibiotics

Scientists have made an important advance in understanding how a subset of bacterial cells escape being killed by many antibiotics. [More]
Restricting antibiotics use unlikely to stop spread of drug resistance in typhoid fever

Restricting antibiotics use unlikely to stop spread of drug resistance in typhoid fever

Restricting the use of antibiotics is unlikely to stop the spread of drug resistance in typhoid fever, according to a study funded by the Wellcome Trust and published in the journal eLife. [More]
University of Maryland receives renewed NIH funding for vaccine research

University of Maryland receives renewed NIH funding for vaccine research

The University of Maryland School of Medicine's Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) has successfully competed for and received a renewed contract to conduct basic research and clinical studies of vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Support for this work to combat existing and emerging infectious diseases is provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). [More]
MIT engineers develop nanoparticles that deliver cancer vaccines to lungs

MIT engineers develop nanoparticles that deliver cancer vaccines to lungs

Many viruses and bacteria infect humans through mucosal surfaces, such as those in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract and reproductive tract. To help fight these pathogens, scientists are working on vaccines that can establish a front line of defense at mucosal surfaces. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement