Urinary Incontinence News and Research RSS Feed - Urinary Incontinence News and Research

Urinary incontinence (UI), or the unintentional loss of urine, is a problem for more than 13 million Americans—85 percent of them women. Although about half of the elderly have episodes of incontinence, bladder problems are not a natural consequence of aging, and they are not exclusively a problem of the elderly.

Incontinence has several causes. Women are most likely to develop incontinence either during pregnancy and childbirth, or after the hormonal changes of menopause, because of weakened pelvic muscles. Older men can become incontinent as the result of prostate surgery. Pelvic trauma, spinal cord damage, caffeine, or medications including cold or over-the-counter diet tablets also can cause episodes of incontinence.

But even though urinary incontinence can be improved in 8 out of 10 cases, fewer than half of those with bladder problems ever discuss the condition with their health care professional. The condition often goes untreated.
Xiao procedure lacks efficacy for bladder control in children

Xiao procedure lacks efficacy for bladder control in children

Researchers at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital report the results of a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of the "Xiao procedure" in children with spina bifida. [More]
Beaumont urologists study use of enobosarm to treat women's SUI

Beaumont urologists study use of enobosarm to treat women's SUI

Could a one-a-day pill be the answer for women with stress urinary incontinence - a condition resulting in leakage with coughing, sneezing and laughing? [More]
Most patients prefer portable media devices to face-to-face consultation when discussing surgery

Most patients prefer portable media devices to face-to-face consultation when discussing surgery

Often patients undergo procedures without real informed consent being achieved due to technical language, jargon and time pressure, with up to half of patients finding it difficult to understand what their doctor tells them. Now a group of Australian doctors has prepared patients for surgery using iPads, and found that patients' understanding was much better than after a face-to-face consultation. [More]
Homeless adults have more geriatric conditions than those living in homes

Homeless adults have more geriatric conditions than those living in homes

Homeless people in their fifties have more geriatric conditions than those living in homes who are decades older, according to researchers at UC San Francisco who are following 350 people who are homeless and aged 50 and over, in Oakland. [More]
Study examines long-term impact of delivery mode on stress urinary incontinence

Study examines long-term impact of delivery mode on stress urinary incontinence

Stress and urgency incontinence are the two most frequent and the most bothersome urinary symptoms among women. It has been estimated that about twelve percent of women report significant bother from stress incontinence and eight percent from urgency incontinence. Urinary incontinence affects hundreds of millions of women worldwide. [More]
Physical therapy reduces urinary problems in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

Physical therapy reduces urinary problems in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

After menopause, women with osteoporosis struggle more with urinary incontinence than women with healthy bones do. But physical therapy that includes pelvic floor muscle training can produce dramatic improvements, shows a study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
New evidence highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh for surgical repair of vaginal prolapse

New evidence highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh for surgical repair of vaginal prolapse

New evidence published today highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh when compared with tissue repair in the surgical treatment of vaginal prolapse. Slightly better repair with mesh needs to be weighed carefully against increased risk of harms. [More]
American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

The care of adults over age 65 with type 2 diabetes is a growing concern: the prevalence of diabetes is highest in this age group and is expected to grow as the U.S. population ages, with many needing care at long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]
High intensity focused ultrasound provides important treatment for men with prostate cancer

High intensity focused ultrasound provides important treatment for men with prostate cancer

For the estimated 220,000 men who will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year, deciding on a method of treatment can be a challenge. Some with early-stage cancer pursue a "wait and watch" option, also called active surveillance, while others with more severe cancer immediately pursue surgery, including prostatectomy (removal of the prostate). [More]
Men not having important discussions with health providers about prostate cancer screening, treatment

Men not having important discussions with health providers about prostate cancer screening, treatment

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and the University of Memphis recently published an article in the American Journal of Men's Health which found that men and their health providers are not having important discussions when it comes to prostate cancer screening and treatment. [More]
FDA issues two final orders to strengthen requirements for transvaginal surgical mesh safety

FDA issues two final orders to strengthen requirements for transvaginal surgical mesh safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued two final orders to manufacturers and the public to strengthen the data requirements for surgical mesh to repair pelvic organ prolapse (POP) transvaginally, or through the vagina. [More]
PSA screening for prostate cancer drops significantly in middle-aged men

PSA screening for prostate cancer drops significantly in middle-aged men

PSA testing has dropped significantly in middle-aged men after a 2012 recommendation that all men should not be routinely screened for prostate cancer, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Maintaining normal BMI after pregnancy can help prevent pelvic organ prolapse

Maintaining normal BMI after pregnancy can help prevent pelvic organ prolapse

Maintaining a normal body mass index (BMI) is important for good cardiovascular health and blood sugar control, but maintaining it after pregnancy can also be key to preventing pelvic organ prolapse, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers. [More]
AGS releases updated, expanded Beers Criteria to improve medication use in older adults

AGS releases updated, expanded Beers Criteria to improve medication use in older adults

The American Geriatrics Society today released its second updated and expanded Beers Criteria--lists of potentially inappropriate medications for older adults who are not receiving hospice or palliative care, and one of the most frequently cited reference tools in the field of geriatrics. [More]
Global urinary catheters market to expand at 4.1% CAGR between 2015 and 2021

Global urinary catheters market to expand at 4.1% CAGR between 2015 and 2021

According to a new market report published by Persistence Market Research titled "Global Market Study on Urinary Catheters: Intermittent Catheters Segment to Witness Highest Growth by 2021", the urinary catheters market is expected to be valued at US$1,377.5 Mn by the end of 2015. It is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of4.1% from 2015 to 2021, to reach US$1,755.0 Mn by 2021. [More]
Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Special efforts should be made to identify and treat depression and urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women with vaginal symptoms, according to UC San Francisco researchers, as these two common conditions not only tend to co-exist with vaginal symptoms but also may complicate the impact of these symptoms on women's daily activities and quality of life. [More]
New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

A new Cochrane systematic review published today of surgery for stress urinary incontinence makes an important contribution to an ongoing debate and will help women to make more informed choices about treatment. [More]
Bariatric surgery can significantly reduce urinary incontinence

Bariatric surgery can significantly reduce urinary incontinence

For severely obese people, bariatric surgery may have a benefit besides dramatic weight loss: it can also substantially reduce urinary incontinence. [More]

Fair Rate Funding: Delaware woman gets $100M against Boston Scientific in TV mesh judgment

Fair Rate Funding, a leader in TV mesh lawsuit funding, reports that a state-court jury in Delaware found Thursday that Boston Scientific's Pinnacle and Advantage Fit inserts, designed to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) in women, were defectively designed and that company executives hid the design flaws from the plaintiff, Deborah Barba. [More]
Botulinum toxin A effective for treating bladder disorders

Botulinum toxin A effective for treating bladder disorders

While Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A), known to the public as Botox, is commonly associated with smoothing wrinkles for a more youthful appearance, three studies presented at the 110th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association are proving BTX-A to be more than just a cosmetic solution. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement