Urinary Incontinence News and Research RSS Feed - Urinary Incontinence News and Research

Urinary incontinence (UI), or the unintentional loss of urine, is a problem for more than 13 million Americans—85 percent of them women. Although about half of the elderly have episodes of incontinence, bladder problems are not a natural consequence of aging, and they are not exclusively a problem of the elderly.

Incontinence has several causes. Women are most likely to develop incontinence either during pregnancy and childbirth, or after the hormonal changes of menopause, because of weakened pelvic muscles. Older men can become incontinent as the result of prostate surgery. Pelvic trauma, spinal cord damage, caffeine, or medications including cold or over-the-counter diet tablets also can cause episodes of incontinence.

But even though urinary incontinence can be improved in 8 out of 10 cases, fewer than half of those with bladder problems ever discuss the condition with their health care professional. The condition often goes untreated.
High BMI or fat mass linked to increased risk for SUI and UUI in older women

High BMI or fat mass linked to increased risk for SUI and UUI in older women

In a study of older women, the prevalence of stress- and urgency urinary incontinence (SUI and UUI) was at least two-fold higher among women in the highest category of body mass index (BMI) or fat mass compared with women in the lowest category. [More]
ATOMS device shows efficacy in treating male stress urinary incontinence

ATOMS device shows efficacy in treating male stress urinary incontinence

In the largest study yet to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of the adjustable transobturator male system to treat incontinence in men following invasive prostate treatment, the overall success and dry rates were 90% and 64%, respectively, after a median of 31 months. [More]
Women who have not given birth also experience urinary incontinence, study finds

Women who have not given birth also experience urinary incontinence, study finds

Women who have not given birth often end up under the radar for research on urinary incontinence. In a study of this group, however, one in five women over 45 years say they experience this type of incontinence. [More]
Revised prostate cancer guidelines did not reduce usage of PSA tests, study finds

Revised prostate cancer guidelines did not reduce usage of PSA tests, study finds

Controversy over prostate cancer screening guidelines that discourage use of PSA tests did not significantly reduce use of the test, a five-year review of more than 275,000 visits at UT Southwestern Medical Center showed. [More]
RTI extends research support to improve treatment for pelvic floor disorders in women

RTI extends research support to improve treatment for pelvic floor disorders in women

RTI International will continue supporting research efforts to improve clinical care for women with pelvic floor disorders as part of the Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. [More]
New device could help improve outcomes of pelvic tumour surgeries

New device could help improve outcomes of pelvic tumour surgeries

Tumour surgery in the pelvis (urogenital and anal area) can lead to injuries of the regional nervous centre and therefore to bowel and bladder incontinence and sexual function disorders. [More]
Mobile app helps reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence in women

Mobile app helps reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence in women

Urinary leakage whilst coughing and jumping is common in women. Using a self-administered treatment via a mobile app called Tät for three months reduced symptoms, led to fewer leakages and improved quality of life. [More]
Female triathletes suffer from high rate of stress urinary and anal incontinence, study finds

Female triathletes suffer from high rate of stress urinary and anal incontinence, study finds

A study led by Loyola Medicine researchers found that female triathletes are at higher risk for pelvic floor disorders, among other health issues. [More]
New study shows female urologists perform more surgeries on women than male counterparts

New study shows female urologists perform more surgeries on women than male counterparts

Although female certified urologists are still a minority within the specialty, they perform many more procedures on women than their male colleagues, who perform more procedures on men than their female colleagues. [More]
NYU Lutheran helps patients fight prostate cancer with latest diagnostic and robotic surgery technology

NYU Lutheran helps patients fight prostate cancer with latest diagnostic and robotic surgery technology

Leading NYU Lutheran's fight is Marc Bjurlin, DO, the hospital's newly appointed director of urologic oncology and clinical assistant professor of urology at NYU School of Medicine. [More]
MRI-guided focal laser ablation could be feasible, safe in prostate cancer patients

MRI-guided focal laser ablation could be feasible, safe in prostate cancer patients

Prostate cancer patients may soon have a new option to treat their disease: laser heat. UCLA researchers have found that focal laser ablation - the precise application of heat via laser to a tumor - is both feasible and safe in men with intermediate risk prostate cancer. [More]
Xiao procedure lacks efficacy for bladder control in children

Xiao procedure lacks efficacy for bladder control in children

Researchers at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital report the results of a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of the "Xiao procedure" in children with spina bifida. [More]
Beaumont urologists study use of enobosarm to treat women's SUI

Beaumont urologists study use of enobosarm to treat women's SUI

Could a one-a-day pill be the answer for women with stress urinary incontinence - a condition resulting in leakage with coughing, sneezing and laughing? [More]
Most patients prefer portable media devices to face-to-face consultation when discussing surgery

Most patients prefer portable media devices to face-to-face consultation when discussing surgery

Often patients undergo procedures without real informed consent being achieved due to technical language, jargon and time pressure, with up to half of patients finding it difficult to understand what their doctor tells them. Now a group of Australian doctors has prepared patients for surgery using iPads, and found that patients' understanding was much better than after a face-to-face consultation. [More]
Homeless adults have more geriatric conditions than those living in homes

Homeless adults have more geriatric conditions than those living in homes

Homeless people in their fifties have more geriatric conditions than those living in homes who are decades older, according to researchers at UC San Francisco who are following 350 people who are homeless and aged 50 and over, in Oakland. [More]
Study examines long-term impact of delivery mode on stress urinary incontinence

Study examines long-term impact of delivery mode on stress urinary incontinence

Stress and urgency incontinence are the two most frequent and the most bothersome urinary symptoms among women. It has been estimated that about twelve percent of women report significant bother from stress incontinence and eight percent from urgency incontinence. Urinary incontinence affects hundreds of millions of women worldwide. [More]
Physical therapy reduces urinary problems in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

Physical therapy reduces urinary problems in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

After menopause, women with osteoporosis struggle more with urinary incontinence than women with healthy bones do. But physical therapy that includes pelvic floor muscle training can produce dramatic improvements, shows a study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
New evidence highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh for surgical repair of vaginal prolapse

New evidence highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh for surgical repair of vaginal prolapse

New evidence published today highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh when compared with tissue repair in the surgical treatment of vaginal prolapse. Slightly better repair with mesh needs to be weighed carefully against increased risk of harms. [More]
American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

The care of adults over age 65 with type 2 diabetes is a growing concern: the prevalence of diabetes is highest in this age group and is expected to grow as the U.S. population ages, with many needing care at long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]
High intensity focused ultrasound provides important treatment for men with prostate cancer

High intensity focused ultrasound provides important treatment for men with prostate cancer

For the estimated 220,000 men who will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year, deciding on a method of treatment can be a challenge. Some with early-stage cancer pursue a "wait and watch" option, also called active surveillance, while others with more severe cancer immediately pursue surgery, including prostatectomy (removal of the prostate). [More]
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