Urinary Incontinence News and Research RSS Feed - Urinary Incontinence News and Research

Urinary incontinence (UI), or the unintentional loss of urine, is a problem for more than 13 million Americans—85 percent of them women. Although about half of the elderly have episodes of incontinence, bladder problems are not a natural consequence of aging, and they are not exclusively a problem of the elderly.

Incontinence has several causes. Women are most likely to develop incontinence either during pregnancy and childbirth, or after the hormonal changes of menopause, because of weakened pelvic muscles. Older men can become incontinent as the result of prostate surgery. Pelvic trauma, spinal cord damage, caffeine, or medications including cold or over-the-counter diet tablets also can cause episodes of incontinence.

But even though urinary incontinence can be improved in 8 out of 10 cases, fewer than half of those with bladder problems ever discuss the condition with their health care professional. The condition often goes untreated.
American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

The care of adults over age 65 with type 2 diabetes is a growing concern: the prevalence of diabetes is highest in this age group and is expected to grow as the U.S. population ages, with many needing care at long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]
High intensity focused ultrasound provides important treatment for men with prostate cancer

High intensity focused ultrasound provides important treatment for men with prostate cancer

For the estimated 220,000 men who will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year, deciding on a method of treatment can be a challenge. Some with early-stage cancer pursue a "wait and watch" option, also called active surveillance, while others with more severe cancer immediately pursue surgery, including prostatectomy (removal of the prostate). [More]
Men not having important discussions with health providers about prostate cancer screening, treatment

Men not having important discussions with health providers about prostate cancer screening, treatment

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and the University of Memphis recently published an article in the American Journal of Men's Health which found that men and their health providers are not having important discussions when it comes to prostate cancer screening and treatment. [More]
FDA issues two final orders to strengthen requirements for transvaginal surgical mesh safety

FDA issues two final orders to strengthen requirements for transvaginal surgical mesh safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued two final orders to manufacturers and the public to strengthen the data requirements for surgical mesh to repair pelvic organ prolapse (POP) transvaginally, or through the vagina. [More]
PSA screening for prostate cancer drops significantly in middle-aged men

PSA screening for prostate cancer drops significantly in middle-aged men

PSA testing has dropped significantly in middle-aged men after a 2012 recommendation that all men should not be routinely screened for prostate cancer, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Maintaining normal BMI after pregnancy can help prevent pelvic organ prolapse

Maintaining normal BMI after pregnancy can help prevent pelvic organ prolapse

Maintaining a normal body mass index (BMI) is important for good cardiovascular health and blood sugar control, but maintaining it after pregnancy can also be key to preventing pelvic organ prolapse, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers. [More]
AGS releases updated, expanded Beers Criteria to improve medication use in older adults

AGS releases updated, expanded Beers Criteria to improve medication use in older adults

The American Geriatrics Society today released its second updated and expanded Beers Criteria--lists of potentially inappropriate medications for older adults who are not receiving hospice or palliative care, and one of the most frequently cited reference tools in the field of geriatrics. [More]
Global urinary catheters market to expand at 4.1% CAGR between 2015 and 2021

Global urinary catheters market to expand at 4.1% CAGR between 2015 and 2021

According to a new market report published by Persistence Market Research titled "Global Market Study on Urinary Catheters: Intermittent Catheters Segment to Witness Highest Growth by 2021", the urinary catheters market is expected to be valued at US$1,377.5 Mn by the end of 2015. It is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of4.1% from 2015 to 2021, to reach US$1,755.0 Mn by 2021. [More]
Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Special efforts should be made to identify and treat depression and urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women with vaginal symptoms, according to UC San Francisco researchers, as these two common conditions not only tend to co-exist with vaginal symptoms but also may complicate the impact of these symptoms on women's daily activities and quality of life. [More]
New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

A new Cochrane systematic review published today of surgery for stress urinary incontinence makes an important contribution to an ongoing debate and will help women to make more informed choices about treatment. [More]
Bariatric surgery can significantly reduce urinary incontinence

Bariatric surgery can significantly reduce urinary incontinence

For severely obese people, bariatric surgery may have a benefit besides dramatic weight loss: it can also substantially reduce urinary incontinence. [More]

Fair Rate Funding: Delaware woman gets $100M against Boston Scientific in TV mesh judgment

Fair Rate Funding, a leader in TV mesh lawsuit funding, reports that a state-court jury in Delaware found Thursday that Boston Scientific's Pinnacle and Advantage Fit inserts, designed to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) in women, were defectively designed and that company executives hid the design flaws from the plaintiff, Deborah Barba. [More]
Botulinum toxin A effective for treating bladder disorders

Botulinum toxin A effective for treating bladder disorders

While Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A), known to the public as Botox, is commonly associated with smoothing wrinkles for a more youthful appearance, three studies presented at the 110th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association are proving BTX-A to be more than just a cosmetic solution. [More]
Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors recently awarded more than $2.7 million in contracted funding to Katina Robison, MD, a gynecologic oncologist with the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, for the study "Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Incontinence." [More]
FDA grants tentative approval to Amerigen's ANDA for generic version of Toviaz

FDA grants tentative approval to Amerigen's ANDA for generic version of Toviaz

Amerigen Pharmaceuticals Limited today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tentative approval to the Company's Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for a generic version of Toviaz (Fesoterodine Fumarate Extended-release Tablets, 4mg and 8mg). [More]
Radiation treatment can be delayed after prostatectomy to prevent side effects, say studies

Radiation treatment can be delayed after prostatectomy to prevent side effects, say studies

Important news for men receiving treatment for prostate cancer: Two new studies from the University of Virginia School of Medicine have upended the widely held view that it's best to delay radiation treatment as long as possible after the removal of the prostate in order to prevent unwanted side effects. [More]
Breakthrough treatment option for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Breakthrough treatment option for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition in which the prostate is enlarged but not cancerous, have a new, breakthrough treatment option that is less invasive and has fewer complications than other minimally invasive treatments, such as transurethral resection of the prostate and surgical options, according to research presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects is associated with a significantly higher risk for developing pneumonia in a study of more than 3,000 older Group Health patients living in the community--not in nursing homes. [More]
Research findings lay groundwork for improving treatment assessment for men with prostate cancer

Research findings lay groundwork for improving treatment assessment for men with prostate cancer

UCLA researchers have found that radiation therapy is the most common treatment for men with prostate cancer regardless of the aggressiveness of the tumor, risk to the patient and overall patient prognosis. These findings lay the groundwork for improved treatment assessment by physicians and to better inform men fighting the disease. [More]
Prevalence of geriatric conditions among older, insured patients with diabetes vary little by ethnicity

Prevalence of geriatric conditions among older, insured patients with diabetes vary little by ethnicity

In one of the first studies of its kind, researchers found that the prevalence of geriatric conditions and diabetic complications among older, insured patients with diabetes did not vary significantly by ethnicity. [More]
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