Urinary Tract Infection News and Research RSS Feed - Urinary Tract Infection News and Research

Urinary tract infections are a serious health problem affecting millions of people each year. Infections of the urinary tract are the second most common type of infection in the body. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) account for about 8.3 million doctor visits each year.* Women are especially prone to UTIs for reasons that are not yet well understood. One woman in five develops a UTI during her lifetime. UTIs in men are not as common as in women but can be very serious when they do occur.
Leukemia drug increases brain dopamine, lowers toxic proteins linked to Parkinson's or dementia

Leukemia drug increases brain dopamine, lowers toxic proteins linked to Parkinson's or dementia

A small phase I study provides molecular evidence that an FDA-approved drug for leukemia significantly increased brain dopamine and reduced toxic proteins linked to disease progression in patients with Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Today leading experts on infectious disease and urinary tract infections (UTIs) will gather in London to discuss the alarming state of antibiotic resistance, and present findings from a landmark study that conclusively shows that cranberries can be a nutritional approach to reducing symptomatic UTIs, and as a result, may be a useful strategy to decrease worldwide use of antibiotics. [More]
Large national effort shows promise in reducing both catheter use and UTI rates

Large national effort shows promise in reducing both catheter use and UTI rates

Right now, about one in five hospital patients has a catheter collecting their urine - and putting them at risk of a painful and potentially dangerous urinary tract infection, or UTI. [More]
First clinical trial to study use of Chinese Herbal Medicines in treating RUTIs

First clinical trial to study use of Chinese Herbal Medicines in treating RUTIs

Researchers at the University of Southampton are to study the use of Chinese Herbal Medicines in treating recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs), in the first clinical trial of its kind in the UK. [More]
Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Surgical Risk Calculator accurately estimates the chance of a patient experiencing postoperative complications, and its performance can improve with recalibration of the tool according to research findings appearing online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
Tecentriq drug gets FDA approval to treat urothelial carcinoma

Tecentriq drug gets FDA approval to treat urothelial carcinoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Tecentriq (atezolizumab) to treat the most common type of bladder cancer, called urothelial carcinoma. This is the first product in its class (PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors) approved to treat this type of cancer. [More]
Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Researchers at The University of Alabama at Birmingham have determined specific risk factors associated with hospital readmission following pediatric neurosurgery. [More]
Scientists uncover whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Scientists uncover whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Australian scientists may have found a way to stop deadly bacteria from infecting patients. The discovery could lead to a whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant "superbugs". The researchers have uncovered what may be an Achilles heel on the bacteria cell membrane that could act as a potential novel drug target. [More]
Almost half of all long-stay nursing home residents visit ED every year regardless of cognitive status

Almost half of all long-stay nursing home residents visit ED every year regardless of cognitive status

A new study from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute has found that almost half of all long-stay nursing home residents experience at least one transfer to an Emergency Department over the course of a year regardless of their cognitive status. While a high percentage of long-stay nursing home residents were sent to the ED, only about a third of these individuals were subsequently admitted to the hospital. [More]
Weekend effect in hospitals affect kidney stone treatment, outcomes

Weekend effect in hospitals affect kidney stone treatment, outcomes

Patients with severe cases of kidney stones are 26 percent less likely to receive timely treatment when they're admitted to the hospital on the weekend, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. [More]
SymCel joins global initiative to combat antibiotic resistance

SymCel joins global initiative to combat antibiotic resistance

Following the global and joint initiative by the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostics industries this year to combat antibiotic resistance, demand for innovative solutions is especially high. The event took place in January at the World Economic Forum in Davos. [More]
Report: Patients still experience CLABSIs and CAUTIs in U.S. hospitals

Report: Patients still experience CLABSIs and CAUTIs in U.S. hospitals

Though hospitals are making strides in avoiding central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), a report released today, in the midst of Patient Safety Awareness Week (March 13-19), shows patients are still experiencing these serious, and sometimes fatal, infections too frequently. [More]
Research: Impaired immune response significantly involved in rare autoimmune diseases

Research: Impaired immune response significantly involved in rare autoimmune diseases

In the context of the multicentre EU project "INTRICATE" under the management of Renate Kain of the Clinical Institute for Pathology of MedUni Vienna, the effects of infections on the generation of rare autoimmune diseases such as granulomatous polyangiitis (GPA), a systemic disease of the vascular system, are examined. [More]
Cranberry capsules more effective in lowering UTI risk than juice

Cranberry capsules more effective in lowering UTI risk than juice

A UTI is an infection in any part of the urinary system, kidneys, bladder or urethra. They are more common in women and affect more than 3 million Americans per year. Many in the population will turn to sipping on a cranberry juice cocktail to alleviate their symptoms, but, according to a Texas A&M Health Science Center urologist, drinking cranberry juice to treat a UTI is little more than an old wives' tale. [More]

Survey: 97% of patients concerned about cleaning and re-using catheters

A new survey has revealed significant levels of patient concern about the prospect of being asked to administer a reusable catheter, which require the user to wash and re-use their device. [More]

Innovative microfiber pad could improve diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection in infants and elderly patients

Contamination of urine samples from infants and the elderly is so common that physicians often needlessly prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics prophylactically. Now, a team at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem's BioDesign: Medical Innovation program has developed an innovative microfiber pad that can save time and money in the collection of sterile samples. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim, Lilly announce availability of Synjardy tablets in U.S. pharmacies

Boehringer Ingelheim, Lilly announce availability of Synjardy tablets in U.S. pharmacies

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company announced that Synjardy (empagliflozin/metformin hydrochloride) tablets are now available by prescription in pharmacies across the United States. [More]
People often end up in emergency room because of infection-related falls

People often end up in emergency room because of infection-related falls

People who end up in the emergency room because of a fall often are tripped up by an infection, rather than a loose throw rug or poor eyesight, suggests a study being presented at IDWeek 2015. [More]
New study calls for new treatments for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infection

New study calls for new treatments for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infection

Researchers at The Medicines Company presented data from a multi-national cohort that demonstrates the mortality and morbidity, and poor outcomes, associated with current therapies in patients with infections due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). The data from this analysis has guided the design of the company’s on-going clinical studies of its Phase 3 compound, CARBAVANCE® (meropenem/RPX7009) and was presented at the Interscience Conference of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) and the International Congress of Chemotherapy and Infection (ICC) joint meeting in San Diego, CA. [More]
EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company today announced positive top-line results from EMPA-REG OUTCOME. This is a long-term clinical trial investigating cardiovascular (CV) outcomes for Jardiance (empagliflozin) in more than 7,000 adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) at high risk for CV events. [More]
Advertisement