Uterine Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Uterine Cancer News and Research

When cancer starts in the uterus, it is called uterine cancer. The uterus is the pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis (the area below your stomach and in between your hip bones). The uterus, also called the womb, is where the baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The most common type of uterine cancer is also called endometrial cancer because it forms in the lining of your uterus, called the endometrium.

When uterine cancer is found early, treatment is most effective. The most common sign of uterine cancer is bleeding that is not normal for you because of when it happens or how heavy it is. This could mean bleeding, even a little bit, after you have gone through menopause; periods that are longer than seven days; bleeding between periods; or any other bleeding that is longer or heavier than is normal for you.

Other symptoms, such as pain or pressure in your pelvis, also may occur if you have uterine cancer. If you have any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor, nurse, or other health care professional right away. They may be caused by something other than cancer, but the only way to know is to see your health care professional.
New study describes multi-method strategy to improve detection of PMS2 gene mutations in Lynch syndrome

New study describes multi-method strategy to improve detection of PMS2 gene mutations in Lynch syndrome

About 3% of colorectal cancers are due to Lynch syndrome, an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome that predisposes individuals to various cancers. Close blood relatives of patients with Lynch syndrome have a 50% chance of inheritance. The role that PMS2 genetic mutations play in Lynch syndrome has been underestimated in part due to technological limitations. [More]
CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

The Cancer Research Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fueling the discovery and development of immunotherapies for all forms of cancer, announced that it has committed more than $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate cancer immunology research and cancer immunotherapy clinical development in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and The Netherlands. [More]
Juniper announces enrollment of first patient in COL-1077 Phase II trial to reduce pain during endometrial biopsy

Juniper announces enrollment of first patient in COL-1077 Phase II trial to reduce pain during endometrial biopsy

Juniper Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapeutics for women's health, announced today the first patient has been enrolled in a Phase II clinical trial of COL-1077, a 10% lidocaine bioadhesive gel that is intended as an acute-use anesthetic during minimally invasive gynecologic procedures. [More]
Nearly 15 million U.S. women have limited access to specialized gynecologic cancer care

Nearly 15 million U.S. women have limited access to specialized gynecologic cancer care

More than one-third of counties in the Unites States are located more than 50 miles from the nearest gynecologic oncologist, making access to specialty care for ovarian and other gynecologic cancers difficult for nearly 15 million women. While most of these "low access" counties are located in the Mountain-West and Midwest regions, the findings of a recent study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania also reveal that 47 states have at least one county located more than 50 miles from the nearest gynecologic oncologist. [More]
New treatment option for postmenopausal women with non-invasive breast cancer

New treatment option for postmenopausal women with non-invasive breast cancer

Anastrozole provides a significant benefit compared with tamoxifen in preventing recurrence after a lumpectomy and radiation therapy in postmenopausal women ages 60 years or younger who had DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ), a common diagnosis of non-invasive breast cancer. In women over age 60, it works as well as tamoxifen. [More]
Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors. Such drugs aim to disarm systems developed by cancer cells to evade detection and destruction by immune system cells. [More]
Researchers discover new biomarker to identify women with uterine cancer

Researchers discover new biomarker to identify women with uterine cancer

Researchers at Uppsala University have, together with researchers from Turku and Bergen, discovered a new biomarker which makes it possible to identify women with uterine cancer who have a high risk of recurrence. [More]
Caris Life Sciences study may have potentially significant benefit in patients with uterine cancer

Caris Life Sciences study may have potentially significant benefit in patients with uterine cancer

Caris Life Sciences today announced the presentation of a study that found drugs targeting specific pathways may have potentially significant benefit in a select subset of patients with uterine cancer. The study results were highlighted today in an oral presentation in a Plenary Session at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology 2015 Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Researchers and medical bodies explore ways to secure funds for womb cancer research

Researchers and medical bodies explore ways to secure funds for womb cancer research

A national group of researchers, medical bodies and charities, led by The University of Manchester is looking for help in setting the top priorities for fighting womb cancer, with a survey launched today (23 March 2015). [More]
Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Our research into gynaecological oncology focuses around understanding mechanisms of how genes are regulated or how they become dysregulated in a disease; and also the effects that has on the surface of the endometrium and also the function of the ovaries... [More]
FDA takes immediate steps to help reduce risk of spreading unsuspected uterine cancer

FDA takes immediate steps to help reduce risk of spreading unsuspected uterine cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is taking immediate steps to help reduce the risk of spreading unsuspected cancer in women being treated for uterine fibroids, which is in keeping with Kalorama Information's view that in the female health market there is much room for improvement both in the development of products and the treatment of diseases. [More]
UT Southwestern receives CPRIT grant to expand genetic screening services in North Texas

UT Southwestern receives CPRIT grant to expand genetic screening services in North Texas

Genetic screening services for rural and underserved populations will expand from six to 22 counties in North Texas under a $1.5 million grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
UNM Cancer Center surgeon receives NCI's Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award

UNM Cancer Center surgeon receives NCI's Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award

Surgeon Teresa Rutledge, MD, recently received the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award. Only 11 people nationwide received the award this year. Dr. Rutledge is the third faculty member in the history of the University of New Mexico Cancer Center to be recognized with this honor. [More]
Study shows prevalence of uterine cancer in women undergoing hysterectomy procedure

Study shows prevalence of uterine cancer in women undergoing hysterectomy procedure

Among women undergoing a minimally invasive hysterectomy using electric power morcellation, uterine cancers were present in 27 per 10,000 women at the time of the procedure, according to a study published by JAMA. [More]
Tamoxifen gel stops breast cancer growth without causing dangerous side effects

Tamoxifen gel stops breast cancer growth without causing dangerous side effects

A gel form of tamoxifen applied to the breasts of women with noninvasive breast cancer reduced the growth of cancer cells to the same degree as the drug taken in oral form but with fewer side effects that deter some women from taking it, according to new Northwestern Medicine- research. [More]
Women with BRCA1 mutations may have increased risk for rare types of aggressive uterine cancer

Women with BRCA1 mutations may have increased risk for rare types of aggressive uterine cancer

Women with BRCA1 mutations may have an increased risk for developing rare types of aggressive uterine cancer despite having their ovaries and fallopian tubes removed, suggest preliminary findings being presented at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer in Tampa, Fla., March 22-25. [More]
Scientists develop new method to deliver cancer-fighting drugs directly to milk ducts

Scientists develop new method to deliver cancer-fighting drugs directly to milk ducts

One of every eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer. Though the incidence of breast cancer began decreasing in 2000, it is still the second-leading cause of cancer death in women. [More]
Bariatric surgery reduces uterine cancer risk by 71%

Bariatric surgery reduces uterine cancer risk by 71%

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center report that bariatric surgery resulting in dramatic weight loss in formerly severely obese women reduces the risk of endometrial (uterine) cancer by 71 percent and as much as 81 percent if normal weight is maintained after surgery. [More]
Pelvic radiation therapy to treat uterine cancer may increase risk of developing bladder cancer

Pelvic radiation therapy to treat uterine cancer may increase risk of developing bladder cancer

Radiation therapy used to treat uterine cancer may increase a patient's risk of developing bladder cancer. That is the conclusion of a recent study published in BJU International. [More]
State highlights: States scramble to change newborn screening programs; obesity rate flat; New York hospital charges vary considerably

State highlights: States scramble to change newborn screening programs; obesity rate flat; New York hospital charges vary considerably

States across the country are making significant changes to their newborn screening programs after a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel investigation found that thousands of hospitals were sending babies' blood samples late to state labs that test for rare yet deadly genetic disorders. From keeping labs open on weekends to identifying problem hospitals and providing them with regular performance reports, dozens of health officials are reviewing and retooling their state-run programs (Gabler, 12/11). [More]
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