Uterine Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Uterine Cancer News and Research

When cancer starts in the uterus, it is called uterine cancer. The uterus is the pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis (the area below your stomach and in between your hip bones). The uterus, also called the womb, is where the baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The most common type of uterine cancer is also called endometrial cancer because it forms in the lining of your uterus, called the endometrium.

When uterine cancer is found early, treatment is most effective. The most common sign of uterine cancer is bleeding that is not normal for you because of when it happens or how heavy it is. This could mean bleeding, even a little bit, after you have gone through menopause; periods that are longer than seven days; bleeding between periods; or any other bleeding that is longer or heavier than is normal for you.

Other symptoms, such as pain or pressure in your pelvis, also may occur if you have uterine cancer. If you have any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor, nurse, or other health care professional right away. They may be caused by something other than cancer, but the only way to know is to see your health care professional.
Women with BRCA1 mutations may have increased risk for rare types of aggressive uterine cancer

Women with BRCA1 mutations may have increased risk for rare types of aggressive uterine cancer

Women with BRCA1 mutations may have an increased risk for developing rare types of aggressive uterine cancer despite having their ovaries and fallopian tubes removed, suggest preliminary findings being presented at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer in Tampa, Fla., March 22-25. [More]

Scientists develop new method to deliver cancer-fighting drugs directly to milk ducts

One of every eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer. Though the incidence of breast cancer began decreasing in 2000, it is still the second-leading cause of cancer death in women. [More]

Pelvic radiation therapy to treat uterine cancer may increase risk of developing bladder cancer

Radiation therapy used to treat uterine cancer may increase a patient's risk of developing bladder cancer. That is the conclusion of a recent study published in BJU International. [More]
State highlights: States scramble to change newborn screening programs; obesity rate flat; New York hospital charges vary considerably

State highlights: States scramble to change newborn screening programs; obesity rate flat; New York hospital charges vary considerably

States across the country are making significant changes to their newborn screening programs after a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel investigation found that thousands of hospitals were sending babies' blood samples late to state labs that test for rare yet deadly genetic disorders. From keeping labs open on weekends to identifying problem hospitals and providing them with regular performance reports, dozens of health officials are reviewing and retooling their state-run programs (Gabler, 12/11). [More]
First Edition: December 12, 2013

First Edition: December 12, 2013

Today's headlines include ongoing coverage of the health law's implementation -- from details of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius' Wednesday Capitol Hill appearance and more information about the most recent enrollment numbers to analysis of policy issues related to the overhaul. [More]
Weill Cornell Medical College receives grant to support research efforts designed to end women's cancers

Weill Cornell Medical College receives grant to support research efforts designed to end women's cancers

MasterCard today announced a $500,000 grant to Weill Cornell Medical College to support research efforts designed to end women's cancers. [More]
Scientists identify 127 mutated genes that appear to drive development of tumors in the body

Scientists identify 127 mutated genes that appear to drive development of tumors in the body

Examining 12 major types of cancer, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified 127 repeatedly mutated genes that appear to drive the development and progression of a range of tumors in the body. The discovery sets the stage for devising new diagnostic tools and more personalized cancer treatments. [More]
State highlights: Ore. nonprofit hospitals see increased revenue, but lower charity care; Calif. shift means lost autism treatment

State highlights: Ore. nonprofit hospitals see increased revenue, but lower charity care; Calif. shift means lost autism treatment

A new state report shows the average Oregon hospital more than doubled its margin, or profit, between 2009 and 2011, even as its provision of charity care went down. The findings trace the hospital sector rebound from recessionary lows in 2008, and how expanded Medicaid enrollment in Oregon has helped boost hospitals' bottom line even as many continue to expand to some assessors' dismay (Budnick, 7/5). [More]
First Edition: July 8, 2013

First Edition: July 8, 2013

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including news about a new ad campaign against the health law, more reaction to the administration's delay of the employer mandate provision and states efforts to restrict abortions. [More]
Treatment can restore satisfying sex life post menopause

Treatment can restore satisfying sex life post menopause

A satisfying sex life is an important contributor to older adults' quality of life, but the sexual pain that can come after menopause can rob women and their partners of that satisfaction. Treatment can help restore it, shows a global survey including some 1,000 middle-aged North American men and women, published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Three easy steps for cancer survivorship

Three easy steps for cancer survivorship

Incorporating just three easy steps into a daily routine can increase a cancer patient's chance at survival, according to a physician who specializes in cancer survivorship. [More]

Study: Hormone-therapy-related breast cancer cells can be attacked by cancer therapies

More than 100 women per day die from breast cancer in the United States. The odds of developing breast cancer increase for women taking hormone replacement therapy to avoid the effects of menopause. [More]
Smoking increases risk of developing serious forms of urothelial cancer

Smoking increases risk of developing serious forms of urothelial cancer

Smoking significantly increases individuals’ risk of developing serious forms of urothelial carcinoma and a higher likelihood of dying from the disease, particularly for women. That is the conclusion of a recent study published in BJU International. While the biological mechanisms underlying this gender difference are unknown, the findings indicate that clinicians and society in general should focus on smoking prevention and cessation to safeguard against deadly cancers of the bladder, ureters, and renal pelvis, especially in females. [More]

TSEC strategy can benefit postmenopausal women

Investigators at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have concluded research on a new postmenopausal hormone therapy that shows promise as an effective treatment for menopausal symptoms and the prevention of osteoporosis without increasing the risk for heart disease or breast cancer. [More]
ATLAS holds up 10-year tamoxifen regime

ATLAS holds up 10-year tamoxifen regime

Results from the ATLAS study indicate that women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer should consider taking tamoxifen for up to 10 years after diagnosis. [More]

Uterine cancer recurrence risk after hysterectomy increases due to delay in radiation therapy

Waiting too long after a hysterectomy to begin radiation therapy may increase the risk of uterine cancer recurrence, according to a new study from researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
Researchers identify genes linked to serous endometrial cancer

Researchers identify genes linked to serous endometrial cancer

Researchers have identified several genes that are linked to one of the most lethal forms of uterine cancer, serous endometrial cancer. [More]
Prenatal exposure to BPA appears to program uterine estrogen responsiveness in adulthood

Prenatal exposure to BPA appears to program uterine estrogen responsiveness in adulthood

Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A, or BPA, a chemical found in many common plastic household items, can cause numerous genes in the uterus to respond differently to estrogen in adulthood, according to a study using a mouse model. The results will be presented Tuesday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston. [More]
S-equol effective in reducing menopausal hot flashes, muscle and joint pain among U.S. women

S-equol effective in reducing menopausal hot flashes, muscle and joint pain among U.S. women

A dose of 10 milligrams (mg) daily of S-equol delivered via a newly developed fermented soy germ-based nutritional supplement is as effective as a standard dose of soy isoflavones at reducing hot flash frequency significantly and is even more effective for relieving muscle and joint pain, according to a peer-reviewed study in US postmenopausal women published in the June Journal of Women's Health, available now as a Fast Track article online ahead of print. [More]

Uterine cancer up by 43% in UK over last two decades

Figures show that the number of diagnoses remained static for many years, but has increased by 43% since the 1990s. As the number of womb cancer cases have increased over the last decade, so have the number of womb cancer deaths. However, survival has also improved during that period, with 77% of women who are diagnosed with womb cancer now surviving for five years or more. [More]