Uterine Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Uterine Cancer News and Research

When cancer starts in the uterus, it is called uterine cancer. The uterus is the pear-shaped organ in a woman's pelvis (the area below your stomach and in between your hip bones). The uterus, also called the womb, is where the baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The most common type of uterine cancer is also called endometrial cancer because it forms in the lining of your uterus, called the endometrium.

When uterine cancer is found early, treatment is most effective. The most common sign of uterine cancer is bleeding that is not normal for you because of when it happens or how heavy it is. This could mean bleeding, even a little bit, after you have gone through menopause; periods that are longer than seven days; bleeding between periods; or any other bleeding that is longer or heavier than is normal for you.

Other symptoms, such as pain or pressure in your pelvis, also may occur if you have uterine cancer. If you have any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor, nurse, or other health care professional right away. They may be caused by something other than cancer, but the only way to know is to see your health care professional.
NLCs packed with melatonin could increase effectiveness of tamoxifen drug

NLCs packed with melatonin could increase effectiveness of tamoxifen drug

Tiny bubbles filled with the sleep hormone melatonin can make breast cancer treatment more effective, which means people need a lower dose, giving them less severe side effects. [More]
Multi-center study may help reassure breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen drug

Multi-center study may help reassure breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen drug

A study led by Loyola Medicine researchers may help reassure patients who worry the breast cancer drug tamoxifen could increase their risk of uterine cancer. [More]
Predictive statistical approach opens door to development of more effective therapies for breast cancer

Predictive statistical approach opens door to development of more effective therapies for breast cancer

Designing effective new drugs, especially drugs to fight cancer, demands that you know as much as you can about the molecular workings of cancer growth. Without that, it's like planning to fight a war against an enemy you've never seen. [More]
New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

A large new study of twins has found that having a twin sibling diagnosed with cancer poses an excess risk for the other twin to develop any form of cancer. Among the 23 different types of cancer studied, an excess familial risk was seen for almost all of the cancers, including common cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, but also more rare cancers such as testicular cancer, head and neck cancer, melanoma, ovarian and stomach cancer. [More]
Johns Hopkins-led study shows disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for uterine cancer

Johns Hopkins-led study shows disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for uterine cancer

A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers shows wide racial and economic disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for early uterine cancer in the United States. This is despite years of accumulating evidence that the procedures to remove the uterus are linked to fewer postoperative complications, the researchers say. [More]
New study shows wide disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for uterine cancer

New study shows wide disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for uterine cancer

A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers shows wide racial and economic disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for early uterine cancer in the United States. This is despite years of accumulating evidence that the procedures to remove the uterus are linked to fewer postoperative complications, the researchers say. [More]
Undetected cancer among women undergoing gynecologic surgery more common than previously thought

Undetected cancer among women undergoing gynecologic surgery more common than previously thought

Minimally invasive gynecologic surgeries have advantages for patients, including shorter hospital stays, quicker recoveries, and less pain. However, power morcellation, a technique which cuts the uterus or fibroid into small pieces in order to extract them from the abdomen through a small incision, may worsen a woman's prognosis if a cancer is morcellated unintentionally. [More]
Endocrine Society issues Clinical Practice Guideline on treatment of menopausal symptoms

Endocrine Society issues Clinical Practice Guideline on treatment of menopausal symptoms

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on identifying women who are candidates for treatment of menopausal symptoms and selecting the best treatment options for each individual. [More]
Researchers discover new strategy for attacking cancer cells

Researchers discover new strategy for attacking cancer cells

University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers have discovered a new strategy for attacking cancer cells that could fundamentally alter the way doctors treat and prevent the deadly disease. [More]
UVA researchers identify new strategy for attacking cancer cells

UVA researchers identify new strategy for attacking cancer cells

University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers have discovered a new strategy for attacking cancer cells that could fundamentally alter the way doctors treat and prevent the deadly disease. By more selectively targeting cancer cells, this method offers a strategy to reduce the length of and physical toll associated with current treatments. [More]
New study describes multi-method strategy to improve detection of PMS2 gene mutations in Lynch syndrome

New study describes multi-method strategy to improve detection of PMS2 gene mutations in Lynch syndrome

About 3% of colorectal cancers are due to Lynch syndrome, an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome that predisposes individuals to various cancers. Close blood relatives of patients with Lynch syndrome have a 50% chance of inheritance. The role that PMS2 genetic mutations play in Lynch syndrome has been underestimated in part due to technological limitations. [More]
CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

The Cancer Research Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fueling the discovery and development of immunotherapies for all forms of cancer, announced that it has committed more than $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate cancer immunology research and cancer immunotherapy clinical development in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and The Netherlands. [More]
Juniper announces enrollment of first patient in COL-1077 Phase II trial to reduce pain during endometrial biopsy

Juniper announces enrollment of first patient in COL-1077 Phase II trial to reduce pain during endometrial biopsy

Juniper Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapeutics for women's health, announced today the first patient has been enrolled in a Phase II clinical trial of COL-1077, a 10% lidocaine bioadhesive gel that is intended as an acute-use anesthetic during minimally invasive gynecologic procedures. [More]
Nearly 15 million U.S. women have limited access to specialized gynecologic cancer care

Nearly 15 million U.S. women have limited access to specialized gynecologic cancer care

More than one-third of counties in the Unites States are located more than 50 miles from the nearest gynecologic oncologist, making access to specialty care for ovarian and other gynecologic cancers difficult for nearly 15 million women. While most of these "low access" counties are located in the Mountain-West and Midwest regions, the findings of a recent study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania also reveal that 47 states have at least one county located more than 50 miles from the nearest gynecologic oncologist. [More]
New treatment option for postmenopausal women with non-invasive breast cancer

New treatment option for postmenopausal women with non-invasive breast cancer

Anastrozole provides a significant benefit compared with tamoxifen in preventing recurrence after a lumpectomy and radiation therapy in postmenopausal women ages 60 years or younger who had DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ), a common diagnosis of non-invasive breast cancer. In women over age 60, it works as well as tamoxifen. [More]
Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors. Such drugs aim to disarm systems developed by cancer cells to evade detection and destruction by immune system cells. [More]
Researchers discover new biomarker to identify women with uterine cancer

Researchers discover new biomarker to identify women with uterine cancer

Researchers at Uppsala University have, together with researchers from Turku and Bergen, discovered a new biomarker which makes it possible to identify women with uterine cancer who have a high risk of recurrence. [More]
Caris Life Sciences study may have potentially significant benefit in patients with uterine cancer

Caris Life Sciences study may have potentially significant benefit in patients with uterine cancer

Caris Life Sciences today announced the presentation of a study that found drugs targeting specific pathways may have potentially significant benefit in a select subset of patients with uterine cancer. The study results were highlighted today in an oral presentation in a Plenary Session at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology 2015 Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Researchers and medical bodies explore ways to secure funds for womb cancer research

Researchers and medical bodies explore ways to secure funds for womb cancer research

A national group of researchers, medical bodies and charities, led by The University of Manchester is looking for help in setting the top priorities for fighting womb cancer, with a survey launched today (23 March 2015). [More]
Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Our research into gynaecological oncology focuses around understanding mechanisms of how genes are regulated or how they become dysregulated in a disease; and also the effects that has on the surface of the endometrium and also the function of the ovaries... [More]
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