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Researcher proposes three-point plan to identify, eliminate lead exposure nationwide

Researcher proposes three-point plan to identify, eliminate lead exposure nationwide

The crisis of lead-contaminated drinking water in Flint, Mich., continues to make headlines—but it's just the most prominent example of an "ongoing and needless tragedy of childhood lead poisoning," according David E. Jacobs, PhD, CIH, a noted authority on childhood lead poisoning prevention. [More]
Axumin approved for use in PET scans in patients with recurrent prostate cancer

Axumin approved for use in PET scans in patients with recurrent prostate cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Axumin, a radioactive diagnostic agent for injection. Axumin is indicated for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in men with suspected prostate cancer recurrence based on elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels following prior treatment. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
FDA finalizes new food safety rule to prevent wide-scale public health harm

FDA finalizes new food safety rule to prevent wide-scale public health harm

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today finalized a new food safety rule under the landmark, bipartisan FDA Food Safety Modernization Act that will help to prevent wide-scale public health harm by requiring companies in the United States and abroad to take steps to prevent intentional adulteration of the food supply. [More]
First buprenorphine implant for opioid dependence treatment gets FDA approval

First buprenorphine implant for opioid dependence treatment gets FDA approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Probuphine, the first buprenorphine implant for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Probuphine is designed to provide a constant, low-level dose of buprenorphine for six months in patients who are already stable on low-to-moderate doses of other forms of buprenorphine, as part of a complete treatment program. [More]
World Health Assembly underscores need for multisectoral action to achieve health-related SDGs

World Health Assembly underscores need for multisectoral action to achieve health-related SDGs

Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, addressed the World Health Assembly today. [More]
New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

As the 69th World Health Assembly discusses progress on the Global Vaccine Action Plan, a new data visualization platform--from the International Vaccine Access Center at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health--provides stark numbers on where shortfalls exist in vaccine introduction and coverage. [More]
Novel strategy to predict antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses

Novel strategy to predict antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses

During the 2014-15 flu season, the poor match between the virus used to make the world's vaccine stocks and the circulating seasonal virus yielded a vaccine that was less than 20 percent effective. [More]
Injectable IPV with bivalent oral vaccine safer than using oral vaccine alone

Injectable IPV with bivalent oral vaccine safer than using oral vaccine alone

A groundbreaking study released today shows that a single injectable dose of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) along with bivalent oral polio vaccine could protect up to 90 percent of children from polio and strengthen community protection against the disease. [More]
High-resolution image of Zika virus helicase may help develop antiviral drugs

High-resolution image of Zika virus helicase may help develop antiviral drugs

A team led by researchers from Tianjin University has solved the structure of the Zika virus helicase, which is a key target for antiviral development. The research is published in Springer's journal Protein & Cell. [More]
New collaborative research center to investigate promising aspects of mucosal immunology

New collaborative research center to investigate promising aspects of mucosal immunology

Immunology - and the idea that many diseases can best be addressed by boosting the body's own immune response - is one of the hottest areas in medical research and clinical treatment. [More]
NS5 viral protein could be promising vaccine target against Zika virus

NS5 viral protein could be promising vaccine target against Zika virus

A viral protein known as NS5 is a promising target for vaccines against Zika and related viruses, according to National Institutes of Health scientists and colleagues at Mount Sinai's Icahn School of Medicine. [More]
Tecentriq drug gets FDA approval to treat urothelial carcinoma

Tecentriq drug gets FDA approval to treat urothelial carcinoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Tecentriq (atezolizumab) to treat the most common type of bladder cancer, called urothelial carcinoma. This is the first product in its class (PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors) approved to treat this type of cancer. [More]
MSF responds to Lord O'Neill's recommendations on how to defeat drug resistance and superbugs

MSF responds to Lord O'Neill's recommendations on how to defeat drug resistance and superbugs

The O'Neill report confirms what MSF has long voiced. The pharmaceutical industry’s system for researching and developing medicines is not always delivering the drugs, vaccines and diagnostics needed. When they are developed, they are often unaffordable or not suitable for the people who need them most [More]
Potential vaccine that resembles sugar structures may help fight against gut bacterium C. difficile

Potential vaccine that resembles sugar structures may help fight against gut bacterium C. difficile

A vaccine against one of the most dangerous hospital germs may soon be available. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam and the Freie Universität Berlin have developed a substance that elicits an immune response against the gut bacterium Clostridium difficile. [More]
Tdap vaccine safe for mothers and infants

Tdap vaccine safe for mothers and infants

Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine is recommended for all pregnant women in the U.S. as the key medical intervention to protect newborn infants from pertussis (whooping cough). [More]
Mouse models of Zika virus infection in pregnancy provide basis to develop vaccines, treatments

Mouse models of Zika virus infection in pregnancy provide basis to develop vaccines, treatments

Two mouse models of Zika virus infection in pregnancy have been developed by a team of researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. In them, the virus migrated from the pregnant mouse's bloodstream into the placenta, where it multiplied, then spread into the fetal circulation and infected the brains of the developing pups. [More]
Brazilian strain of Zika virus can cause severe birth defects

Brazilian strain of Zika virus can cause severe birth defects

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Brazil and Senegal, have described the first "direct experimental proof" that the Brazilian strain of Zika virus can actually cause severe birth defects. The findings are published in the May 11 online issue of Nature. [More]
Air-dried silk protein encapsulation can stabilize blood samples for long periods of time

Air-dried silk protein encapsulation can stabilize blood samples for long periods of time

Researchers at Tufts University have stabilized blood samples for long periods of time without refrigeration and at high temperatures by encapsulating them in air-dried silk protein. [More]
Patient-specific immunotherapeutic vaccines may improve overall survival of melanoma patients

Patient-specific immunotherapeutic vaccines may improve overall survival of melanoma patients

Two patients with melanoma that had spread to the liver survived for at least 8.5 and 12 years after resection of the hepatic tumor and treatment with patient-specific immunotherapeutic vaccines. [More]
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