Vandetanib News and Research RSS Feed - Vandetanib News and Research

Vandetanib is a substance being studied in the treatment of lung cancer and other types of cancer. It may block the growth and spread of tumor cells and prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. Vandetanib is a type of tyrosine kinase inhibitor and a type of antiangiogenesis agent. Also called Zactima.
EGFR biomarkers predict NSCLC response to vandetanib

EGFR biomarkers predict NSCLC response to vandetanib

Biomarker analyses of tumour samples from the ZODIAC study indicate that epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number and mutation status may help identify the non-small-cell lung cancer patients most likely to benefit from treatment with vandetanib plus docetaxel. [More]
Vandetanib delays disease progression in elderly NSCLC patients

Vandetanib delays disease progression in elderly NSCLC patients

Vandetanib used in combination with gemcitabine significantly improves progression-free survival compared with gemcitabine alone when used as a first-line treatment for elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, Italian researchers report. [More]
Added benefit of thyroid cancer drug vandetanib not proven

Added benefit of thyroid cancer drug vandetanib not proven

Vandetanib (trade name: Caprelsa) has been approved in Germany since February 2012 for the treatment of adult patients who have a particular form of aggressive thyroid cancer. In a new benefit assessment, the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care has now examined the added benefit of the drug pursuant to the Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products. [More]
Study provides important details for recently identified target in lung adenocarcinoma

Study provides important details for recently identified target in lung adenocarcinoma

In results presented at ASCO 2013, a University of Colorado Cancer Center study provides important details for a recently identified driver and target in lung adenocarcinoma: rearrangement of the gene RET. [More]
AstraZeneca receives FDA approval for Cometriq to treat medullary thyroid cancer

AstraZeneca receives FDA approval for Cometriq to treat medullary thyroid cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Cometriq (cabozantinib) to treat medullary thyroid cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastasized). [More]
Vandetanib shows efficacy in thyroid cancer

Vandetanib shows efficacy in thyroid cancer

The tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib could significantly extend progression-free survival in patients with locally advanced or metastatic differentiated radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer, show results of a small phase II randomized trial. [More]
Vandetanib given for advanced differentiated thyroid cancer almost doubles progression free survival

Vandetanib given for advanced differentiated thyroid cancer almost doubles progression free survival

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Hypoxic lung environment increases HIF-2a tumor growth signaling

Hypoxic lung environment increases HIF-2a tumor growth signaling

In addition to the well-known risk factor of smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increases lung cancer risk. [More]
New approach to drug design may yield more effective and less toxic cancer medicines

New approach to drug design may yield more effective and less toxic cancer medicines

A new approach to drug design, pioneered by a group of researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Mt. Sinai, New York, promises to help identify future drugs to fight cancer and other diseases that will be more effective and have fewer side effects. [More]
Scientists create cancer model built in the fruit fly Drosophila

Scientists create cancer model built in the fruit fly Drosophila

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine developed a cancer model built in the fruit fly Drosophila, then used it to create a whole new approach to the discovery of cancer treatments. The result is an investigational compound AD80 that precisely targets multiple cancer genes. [More]
First trial to investigate new drug combination for NSCLC

First trial to investigate new drug combination for NSCLC

Cancer Research UK's Drug Development Office has opened the first trial of a new drug combination in patients with advanced solid tumours and in a subset of patients who have non-small cell lung cancer. This trial will combine two compounds that aim to starve the tumours while simultaneously blocking cancer cell growth. [More]
AstraZeneca selects Biologics as U.S. channel partner for vandetanib

AstraZeneca selects Biologics as U.S. channel partner for vandetanib

Biologics, Inc., an integrated oncology management company, is pleased to announce it has been selected by AstraZeneca as the exclusive U.S. strategic channel partner for vandetanib. [More]
AstraZeneca announces U.S. availability of vandetanib for rare medullary thyroid cancer

AstraZeneca announces U.S. availability of vandetanib for rare medullary thyroid cancer

AstraZeneca today announced that the orphan drug vandetanib is now available to U.S. patients for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer that cannot be removed by surgery or that has spread to other parts of the body. [More]
Research on rare cancers

Research on rare cancers

A cancer diagnosis can be a life-changing event. Many questions arise, with one of the first being, "Where should I be treated?" Patients diagnosed with rare cancers may have difficulty finding a physician knowledgeable in treating their type of cancer. [More]
AstraZeneca's vandetanib receives FDA approval in medullary thyroid cancer

AstraZeneca's vandetanib receives FDA approval in medullary thyroid cancer

AstraZeneca today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the orphan drug vandetanib for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer that cannot be removed by surgery or that has spread to other parts of the body. [More]
AstraZeneca receives FDA approval for vandetanib to treat medullary thyroid cancer

AstraZeneca receives FDA approval for vandetanib to treat medullary thyroid cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved vandetanib to treat adult patients with late-stage (metastatic) medullary thyroid cancer who are ineligible for surgery and who have disease that is growing or causing symptoms. [More]
PET imaging may play a role in early evaluation of vandetanib response in thyroid cancer

PET imaging may play a role in early evaluation of vandetanib response in thyroid cancer

Positron emission tomography can image metabolic changes following treatment with the protein kinase inhibitor vandetanib, helping to define the therapy response or the effectiveness of the therapeutic agent, according to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. [More]
AstraZeneca announces FDA Advisory Committee meeting outcome for vandetanib NDA

AstraZeneca announces FDA Advisory Committee meeting outcome for vandetanib NDA

AstraZeneca today announced the outcome of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee meeting to discuss the New Drug Application (NDA) for AstraZeneca's investigational drug, vandetanib, for the treatment of patients with unresectable (non-operable) locally advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). [More]
FDA and EMA accept regulatory submissions of vandetanib for advanced medullary thyroid cancer

FDA and EMA accept regulatory submissions of vandetanib for advanced medullary thyroid cancer

AstraZeneca today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) have accepted regulatory submissions for review of the investigational drug vandetanib in the treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). The FDA also granted priority review status for the new drug application and set a Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) action date of 7 January 2011. [More]
Synthetic lethality boosts effectiveness of molecularly targeted therapies against tumors

Synthetic lethality boosts effectiveness of molecularly targeted therapies against tumors

Molecularly targeted therapies can reduce tumors rapidly. However, not all tumors respond to the drugs, and even those that do often develop resistance over time. Looking for a way to combat the problem of resistance, researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center hypothesized that hitting already weakened cancer cells with a second targeted agent could kill them-but only if it was the right second agent. [More]