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Study finds stable trends in ventilator-associated pneumonia rates

Study finds stable trends in ventilator-associated pneumonia rates

In a study published online by JAMA, Mark L. Metersky, M.D., of the UConn School of Medicine, Farmington, and colleagues analyzed trends in Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System ventilator-associated pneumonia rates from 2005 through 2013. [More]
Fresh insights into immune cell could signal new approach to treating life-threatening lung condition

Fresh insights into immune cell could signal new approach to treating life-threatening lung condition

Fresh insights into a life-threatening lung condition triggered by blood poisoning could signal a new approach to treating the disease, researchers found. [More]
CHEST, ATS release new guidelines for discontinuing mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults

CHEST, ATS release new guidelines for discontinuing mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults

The American College of Chest Physicians and the American Thoracic Society have published new guidelines for discontinuing mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. [More]
Experts develop new communication app for adult and pediatric ICU patients

Experts develop new communication app for adult and pediatric ICU patients

The department of Intensive Care of the Radboud university medical center in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, has developed a unique communication app for adult and pediatric ICU patients, who cannot speak due to an intubation, being on a ventilator or breathing through a tracheostoma. [More]
Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

LifeVest, a technology being developed at St. Michael's Hospital to help newborns breathe, won the Global Healthcare Innovation Academy's international competition in Calgary. [More]
Interstate partners with Getinge to bring OEM ventilator batteries directly to critical care providers

Interstate partners with Getinge to bring OEM ventilator batteries directly to critical care providers

Interstate Batteries announced a partnership today with Maquet Medical Systems USA (now Getinge Group) to provide original equipment manufacturer (OEM) batteries to the health care industry through its All Battery Center retail stores. [More]
Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Because of the beneficial effect of corticosteroids on lung function, especially in infants who are ventilator dependent, corticosteroids are, at times, administered to very low birth weight neonates to treat established or evolving lung disease. However, it has long been suspected that steroids may have negative neurodevelopmental effects on very premature infants. [More]
Lifestyle choices more likely to influence quality of life for ARDS survivors

Lifestyle choices more likely to influence quality of life for ARDS survivors

A new study of patients who survive the once-nearly fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) finds their subsequent quality of life has more to do with lifestyle factors than how sick they were in the hospital. [More]
UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health

UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is the only university to be awarded grants in all three perinatal networks from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to improve maternal and infant health. [More]
IDSA/ATS recommends shorter courses of antibiotics for patients with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated pneumonia

IDSA/ATS recommends shorter courses of antibiotics for patients with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated pneumonia

Hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia– which account for 20 to 25 percent of hospital-acquired infections – should be treated with shorter courses of antibiotics than they typically are, according to new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and American Thoracic Society and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Researchers discover strong genetic risk factor for IgA nephropathy

Researchers discover strong genetic risk factor for IgA nephropathy

An international research collaboration has discovered a strong genetic risk factor for IgA nephropathy (IgAN) - the most common inflammatory kidney disease worldwide - and related renal dysfunction. [More]
Reduced RV functional reserve may explain poor SSc-PAH outcomes

Reduced RV functional reserve may explain poor SSc-PAH outcomes

Patients who develop pulmonary arterial hypertension as a consequence of systemic sclerosis have poorer right ventricular functional reserve than those with idiopathic disease, research published in Circulation shows. [More]
Medical applications of world’s smallest differential pressure sensor: an interview with Daniel Träutlein

Medical applications of world’s smallest differential pressure sensor: an interview with Daniel Träutlein

When Sensirion developed the first generation of differential pressure sensors (SDP1108 series), size was not of the essence. Instead Sensirion showed that it could provide, with the thermal flow through technique, a differential pressure sensor which is superior in performance, especially for low differential pressures. [More]
Dishwasher and laundry capsules pose threat to children

Dishwasher and laundry capsules pose threat to children

Parents are being warned of the major health risks of children mistaking potentially harmful dishwasher and laundry capsules for sweets, after figures showed at least one case is happening every day. [More]
Japanese surgeons develop new technique to relieve airway obstruction in children

Japanese surgeons develop new technique to relieve airway obstruction in children

Several pediatric medical conditions, such as congenital heart disease, vascular compression, and congenital softening of the cartilage lining the trachea or bronchi, can compromise the airway and cause breathing difficulty. [More]
Experimental hepatitis C drug slows down development of Zika in mice

Experimental hepatitis C drug slows down development of Zika in mice

Virologists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that an experimental antiviral drug against hepatitis C slows down the development of Zika in mice. The research team was led by Professor Johan Neyts from the Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy. [More]
New CMR imaging technique increases accuracy by eliminating patients' need to breathe naturally

New CMR imaging technique increases accuracy by eliminating patients' need to breathe naturally

A new technique for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging improves accuracy by removing patients' need to breathe, reveals research presented today at EuroCMR 2016 by Professor Juerg Schwitter, director of the Cardiac MR Centre at the University Hospital Lausanne, Switzerland. [More]
New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

A new Canadian study focusing on caregiver outcomes of critically ill patients reveals that caregivers of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, who have received mechanical ventilation for a minimum of seven days, are at a high risk of developing clinical depression persisting up to one year after discharge. [More]
Cerebellar not cerebral atrophy predicts poor anti-NMDAR encephalitis outcome

Cerebellar not cerebral atrophy predicts poor anti-NMDAR encephalitis outcome

Diffuse cerebral atrophy in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis does not necessarily mean irreversible brain damage, whereas progressive cerebellar atrophy may indicate a poor long-term prognosis, researchers report. [More]
Pooled analysis from seven clinical studies demonstrates consistent efficacy for ceftazidime-avibactam in the treatment of multi-drug resistant gram-negative bacteria

Pooled analysis from seven clinical studies demonstrates consistent efficacy for ceftazidime-avibactam in the treatment of multi-drug resistant gram-negative bacteria

AstraZeneca has presented positive data demonstrating the efficacy of the investigational antibiotic, ceftazidime-avibactam (CAZ-AVI), in treating patients with ceftazidime-resistant Gram-negative infections, which are increasingly resistant to most available antibiotics, often precipitating the need for clinicians to reach for agents previously reserved for last-line use. [More]
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