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New study identifies cost-effective way to reduce death due to rabies

New study identifies cost-effective way to reduce death due to rabies

Every year in India, 20,000 people are estimated to die from rabies. Most of the victims are children. Nearly all of the deaths occur after victims are bitten by rabid dogs. For years, experts have debated the best strategy to reduce this burden. [More]
AAV-based gene therapy to treat liver disorders advances into human testing

AAV-based gene therapy to treat liver disorders advances into human testing

Liver-directed gene therapy delivered using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to treat diseases such as hemophilia have advanced into human testing. [More]
Studies in non-human primates provide more predictive results in genetic causes of blindness

Studies in non-human primates provide more predictive results in genetic causes of blindness

Many gene therapy-based approaches are in development to combat genetic and other causes of blindness and vision loss, and much can be learned about the safety and effectiveness of these promising new therapies by studying them first in non-human primates before initiating clinical trials, as shown by the results of a study published in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
ABIVAX reports preclinical data on first-in-class drug candidate for functional cure of HIV/AIDS patients

ABIVAX reports preclinical data on first-in-class drug candidate for functional cure of HIV/AIDS patients

ABIVAX an innovative biotechnology company targeting the immune system to eliminate viral disease, announced today that the Company presented new preclinical data on ABX464, ABIVAX's first-in-class drug candidate for a functional cure of patients with HIV/AIDS, during this week's HIV DART scientific conference in Los Cabos, Mexico. [More]
Improved surveillance systems and coherent policies needed to combat Rift Valley fever

Improved surveillance systems and coherent policies needed to combat Rift Valley fever

Research on the mosquito-borne Rift Valley fever in east Africa and the Arabian Peninsula shows that current surveillance systems are unable to detect the virus in livestock before it spreads to humans. [More]
IDRI awarded two-year NIH grant to develop novel RNA-based Zika virus vaccine

IDRI awarded two-year NIH grant to develop novel RNA-based Zika virus vaccine

As Zika cases continue to rise around the world -- and in the United States -- with associated increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and congenital birth defects, the need for a safe and effective vaccine to protect against Zika virus is greater than ever. [More]
Region of the Americas becomes first in world to eradicate measles

Region of the Americas becomes first in world to eradicate measles

The Region of the Americas is the first in the world to have eliminated measles, a viral disease that can cause severe health problems, including pneumonia, blindness, brain swelling and even death. This achievement culminates a 22-year effort involving mass vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella throughout the Americas. [More]
Researchers reveal potential therapeutic treatment for alphavirus infections

Researchers reveal potential therapeutic treatment for alphavirus infections

Research conducted by Griffith University and Melbourne-based company Paradigm Biopharmaceuticals Limited has uncovered a potential new therapeutic treatment for the global battle against mosquito-borne alphavirus infections, including the debilitating Ross River Virus (RRV) and Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV). [More]
Official statistics may underestimate size of Zika epidemic, study suggests

Official statistics may underestimate size of Zika epidemic, study suggests

A study supported by FAPESP and coordinated by researchers at the São José do Rio Preto Medical School in São Paulo State, Brazil, suggests official statistics may underestimate the size of the epidemic caused by Zika virus. [More]
New gene therapy shows promising results for treating neurodegenerative disorders

New gene therapy shows promising results for treating neurodegenerative disorders

A new gene therapy approach designed to replace the enzyme that is deficient in patients with the inherited neurodegenerative disorders Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases successfully delivered the therapeutic gene to the brains of treated mice, restored enzyme function, and extended survival by about 2.5-fold. [More]
Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epclusa to treat adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) both with and without cirrhosis (advanced liver disease). [More]
Southern Europe may be at risk of Zika outbreaks during this summer

Southern Europe may be at risk of Zika outbreaks during this summer

Established Aedes-mosquito population could spread the Zika virus in Europe this summer if infected travelers introduce the virus. An analysis of temperatures, vectorial capacity, basic reproductive number (R0), and air traveler flows suggests parts of Southern Europe may be at risk for Zika outbreaks between June and August. [More]
Experts at EAN Congress discuss spread of Zika virus threat across Europe

Experts at EAN Congress discuss spread of Zika virus threat across Europe

The Zika epidemic has long assumed global proportions, experts told the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen. Europe needs to get prepared to deal with the relentless spread of the health threat, in particular with a view to "imported" infection. [More]
Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Zika virus can infect and replicate in immune cells from the placenta, without killing them, scientists have discovered. The finding may explain how the virus can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman, on its way to infect developing brain cells in her fetus. [More]
Meta-genomics analysis tool Taxonomer can rapidly and accurately detect pathogens

Meta-genomics analysis tool Taxonomer can rapidly and accurately detect pathogens

Scientists at the University of Utah, ARUP Laboratories, and IDbyDNA, Inc., have developed ultra-fast, meta-genomics analysis software called Taxonomer that dramatically improves the accuracy and speed of pathogen detection. [More]
Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Researchers studying babies with a Zika virus-related birth defect say they have found previously unreported eye problems possibly linked to the virus that could result in severe visual impairment. [More]
New approach offers unprecedented view of how HIV virus infects and appropriates host cell

New approach offers unprecedented view of how HIV virus infects and appropriates host cell

Viruses attack cells and commandeer their machinery in a complex and carefully orchestrated invasion. Scientists have longed probed this process for insights into biology and disease, but essential details still remain out of reach. [More]
Research provides pathway toward creation of first broad-spectrum antiviral drug

Research provides pathway toward creation of first broad-spectrum antiviral drug

By studying the rare person -- about one in a million -- who can fight off viral infections more effectively than everyone else, investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a strategy to help the rest of us achieve this enhanced anti-viral state. [More]
lncRNA in placenta may help protect unborn baby from invading pathogens

lncRNA in placenta may help protect unborn baby from invading pathogens

The human placenta is an organ unlike any other. During the course of nine months it is formed by the embryo, sustains life and then is shed. [More]
Unique attributes of zebrafish may help study human blood disorders

Unique attributes of zebrafish may help study human blood disorders

Genetic regulation of the various types of blood cells in zebrafish and humans is highly similar, making it relatively easy and cost-effective to perform genetic, chemical, imaging and other molecular studies on this invaluable model organism to study normal hematopoetic development in humans as well as blood disorders and malignancies, as described in a Review article in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
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