Viral Vector News and Research RSS Feed - Viral Vector News and Research

Viral Vector is a type of virus used in cancer therapy. The virus is changed in the laboratory and cannot cause disease. Viral vectors may produce tumor antigens (proteins found on a tumor cell) to stimulate an antitumor immune response in the body. Viral vectors may also be used to carry genes that can change cancer cells back to normal cells.
Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys show similarity to humans with Huntington's in their progressive neurodegeneration and decline of motor control, scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, report. [More]
Small-molecule drug simultaneously rejuvenates old muscles, aging brains

Small-molecule drug simultaneously rejuvenates old muscles, aging brains

Whether you're brainy, brawny or both, you may someday benefit from a drug found to rejuvenate aging brain and muscle tissue. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that a small-molecule drug simultaneously perks up old stem cells in the brains and muscles of mice, a finding that could lead to drug interventions for humans that would make aging tissues throughout the body act young again. [More]
UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis investigators have settled a long-standing controversy surrounding the molecular basis of an inherited disorder that historically affected Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe but now also arises in other populations of Semitic descent, particularly families from Saudi Arabia. [More]
Novasep, Celladon sign agreement to develop and supply MYDICAR drug substance

Novasep, Celladon sign agreement to develop and supply MYDICAR drug substance

Novasep, a leading supplier of services and technologies for the life sciences and chemical industries, and Celladon Corporation, a clinical-stage cardiovascular gene therapy company, today announce that they have signed a Development, Manufacturing and Supply Agreement pursuant to which, if supported by upcoming MYDICAR clinical data, Novasep would manufacture MYDICAR drug substance through 2018 with extension options through 2020. [More]
Study: New gene therapy safe, effective for patients with hemophilia B

Study: New gene therapy safe, effective for patients with hemophilia B

A multi-year, ongoing study suggests that a new kind of gene therapy for hemophilia B could be safe and effective for human patients. Published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the research showed that a reprogrammed retrovirus could successfully transfer new factor IX (clotting) genes into animals with hemophilia B to dramatically decrease spontaneous bleeding. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]
New strategy may ensure safety of adult epidermal stem cells before performing treatments

New strategy may ensure safety of adult epidermal stem cells before performing treatments

A team of European researchers has devised a strategy to ensure that adult epidermal stem cells are safe before they are used as treatments for patients. The approach involves a clonal strategy where stem cells are collected and cultivated, genetically modified and single cells isolated before being rigorously tested to make sure they meet the highest possible safety criteria. [More]
Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. [More]
Novasep selected to commercially biomanufacture Celladon's Mydicar API

Novasep selected to commercially biomanufacture Celladon's Mydicar API

Novasep, a leading supplier of services and technologies for the life sciences industry, today announces that it has entered into an agreement with Celladon, a clinical-stage biotechnology company. Novasep will prepare to supply the drug substance for MYDICAR®. [More]
New gene therapy for Acute Intermittent Porphyria

New gene therapy for Acute Intermittent Porphyria

Angeles suffers from a severe and rare genetic disease called Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP). This means, one of her genes restrains her liver to produce a specific protein needed for the metabolism of the blood. During an AIP attack Angeles usually feels intense abdominal pain, and her mental status changes. Women live at an increased risk to trigger the symptoms, because porphyria is related to the menstrual cycle. [More]
Cancer drug shows promise in treating blood cell disorders

Cancer drug shows promise in treating blood cell disorders

Scientists working to make gene therapy a reality have solved a major hurdle: how to bypass a blood stem cell's natural defenses and efficiently insert disease-fighting genes into the cell's genome. [More]
Researchers reproduce tumor chromosomal translocations in human cells

Researchers reproduce tumor chromosomal translocations in human cells

Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre and the Spanish National Cardiovascular Research Centre have been able to reproduce, for the first time in human cells, chromosomal translocations associated with two types of cancer: acute myeloid leukaemia and Ewing's sarcoma. [More]
Study: Sufficient copies of SMN1 gene extend survival in animals with spinal muscular atrophy

Study: Sufficient copies of SMN1 gene extend survival in animals with spinal muscular atrophy

To make up for insufficient amounts of SMN protein, the cause of the inherited neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), researchers have successfully delivered a replacement SMN1 gene directly to the spinal cords of animal models of SMA. [More]
Inserm plays key role in developing European research

Inserm plays key role in developing European research

The French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) is currently the leading biomedical research organisation in Europe, and plays a key role in developing European research. To mark its 50th anniversary, Inserm wanted to assess the perceptions of Europeans regarding biomedical research. [More]
Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

The Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute has received a $2.5 million grant from the Department of Defense to conduct animal studies that, if successful, could provide the basis for a clinical trial of a gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]
Transgene raises €65.5M via two-step capital increase

Transgene raises €65.5M via two-step capital increase

Transgene SA, a French biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering, developing and manufacturing targeted immunotherapies for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases, announces that it has raised a total of €65.5 million via a two-step capital increase. [More]
Researchers identify new player in onset and progression of heart failure

Researchers identify new player in onset and progression of heart failure

A team of cardiovascular researchers from the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, and University of California, San Diego have identified a small, but powerful, new player in the onset and progression of heart failure. [More]
Horizon Discovery, Sirion Biotech ink supply and distribution agreement

Horizon Discovery, Sirion Biotech ink supply and distribution agreement

Horizon Discovery, a leading provider of research tools to support translational genomics and the development of personalized medicines, today announced it has signed a supply and distribution agreement with Sirion Biotech GmbH. [More]
New ways to treat substance abuse, neurological diseases and mental illnesses

New ways to treat substance abuse, neurological diseases and mental illnesses

​Researchers at the University at Buffalo have found a way to change alcohol drinking behavior in rodents, using the emerging technique of optogenetics, which uses light to stimulate neurons. [More]
Researchers report new gene delivery method that targets tumor blood vessels

Researchers report new gene delivery method that targets tumor blood vessels

Working in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report developing a gene delivery method long sought in the field of gene therapy: a deactivated virus carrying a gene of interest that can be injected into the bloodstream and make its way to the right cells. [More]
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