Viral Vector News and Research RSS Feed - Viral Vector News and Research

Viral Vector is a type of virus used in cancer therapy. The virus is changed in the laboratory and cannot cause disease. Viral vectors may produce tumor antigens (proteins found on a tumor cell) to stimulate an antitumor immune response in the body. Viral vectors may also be used to carry genes that can change cancer cells back to normal cells.

Inserm plays key role in developing European research

The French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) is currently the leading biomedical research organisation in Europe, and plays a key role in developing European research. To mark its 50th anniversary, Inserm wanted to assess the perceptions of Europeans regarding biomedical research. [More]
Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

The Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute has received a $2.5 million grant from the Department of Defense to conduct animal studies that, if successful, could provide the basis for a clinical trial of a gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]
Transgene raises €65.5M via two-step capital increase

Transgene raises €65.5M via two-step capital increase

Transgene SA, a French biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering, developing and manufacturing targeted immunotherapies for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases, announces that it has raised a total of €65.5 million via a two-step capital increase. [More]
Researchers identify new player in onset and progression of heart failure

Researchers identify new player in onset and progression of heart failure

A team of cardiovascular researchers from the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, and University of California, San Diego have identified a small, but powerful, new player in the onset and progression of heart failure. [More]
Horizon Discovery, Sirion Biotech ink supply and distribution agreement

Horizon Discovery, Sirion Biotech ink supply and distribution agreement

Horizon Discovery, a leading provider of research tools to support translational genomics and the development of personalized medicines, today announced it has signed a supply and distribution agreement with Sirion Biotech GmbH. [More]
New ways to treat substance abuse, neurological diseases and mental illnesses

New ways to treat substance abuse, neurological diseases and mental illnesses

​Researchers at the University at Buffalo have found a way to change alcohol drinking behavior in rodents, using the emerging technique of optogenetics, which uses light to stimulate neurons. [More]
Researchers report new gene delivery method that targets tumor blood vessels

Researchers report new gene delivery method that targets tumor blood vessels

Working in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report developing a gene delivery method long sought in the field of gene therapy: a deactivated virus carrying a gene of interest that can be injected into the bloodstream and make its way to the right cells. [More]
New form of gene therapy shows promising outcomes for "bubble boy" disease

New form of gene therapy shows promising outcomes for "bubble boy" disease

Researchers reported promising outcomes data for the first group of boys with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID-X1), a fatal genetic immunodeficiency also known as "bubble boy" disease, who were treated as part of an international clinical study of a new form of gene therapy. The mechanism used to deliver the gene therapy is designed to prevent the serious complication of leukemia that arose a decade ago in a similar trial in Europe, when one-quarter of boys treated developed the blood cancer. [More]
New genetics promises to change faulty genes of future generations by using "designer sperm”

New genetics promises to change faulty genes of future generations by using "designer sperm”

Bethesda, MD-Get ready: The "new genetics" promises to change faulty genes of future generations by introducing new, functioning genes using "designer sperm." A new research report appearing online in The FASEB Journal, shows that introducing new genetic material via a viral vector into the sperm of mice leads to the presence and activity of those genes in the resulting embryos. [More]
Transgene welcomes SillaJen’s intention to acquire Jennerex

Transgene welcomes SillaJen’s intention to acquire Jennerex

Transgene SA (Paris:TNG) said today that it welcomed the announcement by SillaJen, Inc. of its intention to acquire Jennerex, Inc. and has consequently given its consent to the definitive merger agreement. [More]
Researchers report long-term benefits of gene therapy in advanced heart failure patients

Researchers report long-term benefits of gene therapy in advanced heart failure patients

Researchers from the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai reported the long-term benefits of a single dose of their gene therapy AAV1/SERCA2a in advanced heart failure patients on Nov. 19 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2013. [More]

Reengineered protein may lead to safer, more effective retroviral gene therapy

A fusion protein engineered by researchers at KU Leuven combining proteins active in HIV and Moloney murine leukaemia virus (MLV) replication may lead to safer, more effective retroviral gene therapy. [More]

Researchers overcome obstacle to using viruses to deliver therapeutic genes

Scientists in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital have found a way to overcome one of the biggest obstacles to using viruses to deliver therapeutic genes: how to keep the immune system from neutralizing the virus before it can deliver its genetic payload. In a study published recently in Molecular Therapy, researchers found that giving subjects a treatment to temporarily rid the body of antibodies provides the virus safe passage to targeted cells, allowing it to release a corrective or replacement gene to treat disease. [More]
Imaxio's pro-immunogenic technology used in tuberculosis vaccine phase I clinical study

Imaxio's pro-immunogenic technology used in tuberculosis vaccine phase I clinical study

Imaxio, a biopharmaceutical company specializing in vaccines and genomics, announces today that IMX313, its proprietary pro-immunogenic technology, has been administered for the first time in humans in a tuberculosis vaccine phase I clinical study. The trial is being conducted by the Jenner Institute at Oxford University, England. [More]

Inhalable gene therapy may restore function of crucial enzyme to reverse deadly PAH

The deadly condition known as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which afflicts up to 150,000 Americans each year, may be reversible by using an inhalable gene therapy, report an international team of researchers led by investigators at the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Imaxio receives FP7 grant to support the development of S. aureus vaccine

Imaxio receives FP7 grant to support the development of S. aureus vaccine

Imaxio, a biopharmaceutical company specialized in vaccines, together with its partners from the Jenner Institute at Oxford University, the European Vaccine Initiative and Preclin Biosystems, is pleased to announce today a European Union award of EUR 5.5 million to support the ‘Bellerophon Project’ consortium to develop a vaccine against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). [More]

Gene therapy developed by UAB cures pediatric Sanfilippo Syndrome A in animal models

A single session of a gene therapy developed by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) cures Sanfilippo Syndrome A in animal models. This syndrome is a neurodegenerative disease that affects between 1 and 9 out of every 100,000 children, and causes the death of the child on reaching adolescence. [More]
Hepatitis C virus rarely transmitted through sex between monogamous heterosexuals

Hepatitis C virus rarely transmitted through sex between monogamous heterosexuals

Individuals infected by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have nothing to fear from sex in a monogamous, heterosexual relationship. Transmission of HCV from an infected partner during sex is rare according to new research published in the March issue of Hepatology, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD). [More]
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience gets grant for research into neurological disorders

Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience gets grant for research into neurological disorders

The Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, the first and only U.S. extension of the prestigious Max Planck Society, today announced it has received approximately $1,257,500 in grant funding from prestigious national and international organizations to fund research into Parkinson-s, epilepsy and other neurological disorders. [More]
Insights into HIV-1 virion makeup could improve gene therapy

Insights into HIV-1 virion makeup could improve gene therapy

A discovery about how the HIV-1 virion packages genomic RNA may help researchers to improve the efficacy of gene therapy. [More]