Viral Vector News and Research RSS Feed - Viral Vector News and Research

Viral Vector is a type of virus used in cancer therapy. The virus is changed in the laboratory and cannot cause disease. Viral vectors may produce tumor antigens (proteins found on a tumor cell) to stimulate an antitumor immune response in the body. Viral vectors may also be used to carry genes that can change cancer cells back to normal cells.
Researchers come up with new approach to stabilize vaccines at room temperature

Researchers come up with new approach to stabilize vaccines at room temperature

Shipping vaccines in an unbroken temperature-controlled supply chain (a "cold chain") all the way to recipients is a major logistical and financial challenge in remote areas and developing countries. [More]
Novel ‘gene therapy in a box’ could effectively deliver modified blood stem cells

Novel ‘gene therapy in a box’ could effectively deliver modified blood stem cells

A table-top device that enables medical staff to genetically manipulate a patient's blood to deliver potential new therapies for cancer, HIV and other diseases would eliminate the need for multi-million-dollar "clean rooms," making gene therapy more possible for even the poorest of countries. [More]
Oligodendrocytes selectively myelinate specific set of neuronal axons, research shows

Oligodendrocytes selectively myelinate specific set of neuronal axons, research shows

There are three kinds of glial cells in the brain, oligodendrocyte, astrocyte and microglia. Oligodendrocytes myelinate neuronal axons to increase conduction velocity of neuronal impulses. [More]
Clinical study results reveal long-term safety of gene transfer to treat macular degeneration

Clinical study results reveal long-term safety of gene transfer to treat macular degeneration

The long-term safety of gene transfer to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD), and the production of two therapeutic proteins encoded by those genes for at least 2.5 years in the eyes of patients with advanced NVAMD are demonstrated in the results of a clinical trial published in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Two new studies from the University of Iowa suggest that gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis. [More]
Viral vector-based approaches could improve effectiveness of CFTR gene therapy

Viral vector-based approaches could improve effectiveness of CFTR gene therapy

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by accumulation of thick mucus in the lungs and is associated with a high incidence of bacterial infection. Mutations in the gene encoding CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) underlie the disease. [More]
Nanoscope researchers develop novel VMCO and NOD platform for patients with vision loss

Nanoscope researchers develop novel VMCO and NOD platform for patients with vision loss

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 285 million people are estimated to be visually impaired worldwide. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of vision loss in aging populations. [More]
NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano a $1.2M (3-year) grant to test whether their non-viral gene delivery method can effectively and safely treat oral cancer pain. [More]
Experimental therapy stops glioblastoma, high-grade gliomas in human cells and mouse models

Experimental therapy stops glioblastoma, high-grade gliomas in human cells and mouse models

Researchers report in the journal Cancer Cell an experimental therapy that in laboratory tests on human cells and mouse models stops aggressive, treatment-resistant and deadly brain cancers called glioblastoma and high-grade gliomas. [More]
Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Pioneering gene therapy may lead to potential cure for common causes of vision loss

Pioneering gene therapy may lead to potential cure for common causes of vision loss

Pioneering gene therapy has restored some vision to patients with a rare form of genetic blindness for as long as four years, raising hopes it could be used to cure common causes of vision loss, new University of Oxford research published today shows. [More]
Penn researchers report results of CAR therapy trial in brain cancer patients

Penn researchers report results of CAR therapy trial in brain cancer patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer known as glioblastoma (GBM) were found to have an acceptable safety profile and successfully migrate to and infiltrate tumors, researchers from Penn Medicine and Harvard University reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2016. [More]
Study shows children with rare eye disease have greatest benefit from gene therapy

Study shows children with rare eye disease have greatest benefit from gene therapy

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University's Casey Eye Institute and Baylor College of Medicine's Cullen Eye Institute published findings from a two-year Phase I clinical trial in the journal Ophthalmology, which showed that children had the greatest benefit from gene therapy for treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) or severe early childhood onset retinal degeneration (SECORD). [More]
Prime boost approach can increase possibility of combined HCV and HIV vaccination

Prime boost approach can increase possibility of combined HCV and HIV vaccination

A combined vaccination against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV moved a step closer, with the results of a study presented at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain today. [More]
Researchers develop novel vaccine strategy to protect against Chikungunya virus

Researchers develop novel vaccine strategy to protect against Chikungunya virus

The Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is transmitted through mosquitoes and causes fever and joint pain that can sometimes become severe and disabling. Outbreaks of the virus have already occurred in Africa, Asia, and Europe, and in late 2013, the virus was first seen in the Americas with the number of cases dramatically increased. No vaccine to prevent or treat this virus currently exists. [More]
Combining photoimmunotherapy and gene transduction effective against elusive gastric cancer cells

Combining photoimmunotherapy and gene transduction effective against elusive gastric cancer cells

Researchers report photoimmunotherapy to be effective against elusive gastric cancer cells following transduction with the gene that expresses the extracellular domain protein of HER2. The results are published in the journal Small Molecule Therapeutics in February 2016. [More]
Cell Therapy Catapult becomes Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult

Cell Therapy Catapult becomes Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult

The Cell Therapy Catapult, the UK organisation dedicated to the growth of the UK cell and gene therapy industry by bridging the gap between scientific research and commercialisation, today announces the official change of its name to the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult. [More]
New gene cut-and-paste methods help correct disease-causing mutation in animal model

New gene cut-and-paste methods help correct disease-causing mutation in animal model

For the first time, researchers have treated an animal model of a genetic disorder using a viral vector to deliver genome-editing components in which the disease- causing mutation has been corrected. [More]
New way to more efficiently deliver CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to mice with Tyrosinemia type I

New way to more efficiently deliver CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to mice with Tyrosinemia type I

University of Massachusetts Medical School researchers have found a way to more efficiently delivery a CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to adult mice with the metabolic disease Tyrosinemia type I that may also prove to be safer for use in humans. [More]
Synpromics, Cell Therapy Catapult to create stable producer cell lines for large-scale manufacture of viral vectors

Synpromics, Cell Therapy Catapult to create stable producer cell lines for large-scale manufacture of viral vectors

Synpromics Ltd, a leading synthetic biology company, and The Cell Therapy Catapult, the UK organisation accelerating the growth of the UK cell and gene therapy industry by bridging the gap between scientific research and commercialisation, today announce the launch of a collaboration to remove a major barrier to the development of the cell and gene therapy industry by reducing the cost and increasing the scale and efficiency of viral vector manufacturing. [More]
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