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Aridis Pharmaceuticals begins Aerucin Phase 1 clinical study for treatment of acute pneumonia

Aridis Pharmaceuticals begins Aerucin Phase 1 clinical study for treatment of acute pneumonia

Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company applying proprietary technologies to produce novel therapies for infectious diseases, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Aerucin, the Company's fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, which is being developed as an adjunctive treatment for acute pneumonia. [More]
Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

The fight to treat cancer and eradicate tumors will likely benefit from a new set of treatments if early development phases continue to show promise, according to Kalorama Information. The healthcare market research publisher stated that gene therapies that are able to deliver genetic material to a specific cell population or tumor that will result in the destruction of the tumor. [More]
Oncolytics' REOLYSIN granted EMA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of gynecological cancers

Oncolytics' REOLYSIN granted EMA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of gynecological cancers

Oncolytics Biotech Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on the development of oncolytic viruses as potential cancer therapeutics, today announced that the European Medicines Agency has granted Orphan Drug Designation for its lead product candidate, REOLYSIN, for the treatment of ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancers. [More]

Animated film deals with the biology of tiger mosquito

The tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, draw more and more attention. Native to Asia, it is invading all the continents, causing a considerable nuisance, and being able to transmit viruses responsible for such serious diseases as dengue or chikungunya. [More]
Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

A multivalent candidate vaccine elicits broad antibody responses to a range of norovirus strains, including strains not included in the vaccine or previously encountered by participants, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Scientists identify key molecules that trigger immune system to fight tularemia

Scientists identify key molecules that trigger immune system to fight tularemia

Research led by scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has identified key molecules that trigger the immune system to launch an attack on the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]
TGAC plans to use miniaturised sequencing device to conduct live environmental surveillance

TGAC plans to use miniaturised sequencing device to conduct live environmental surveillance

As one of the first research Institutes to take part in the MinION Access Programme (MAP) for portable DNA sequencing, introduced by Oxford Nanopore Technologies, The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC)'s task force share their experience of the ground breaking trial so far. [More]
GenVec collaborates with TheraBiologics to develop NSC-mediated cancer therapeutics

GenVec collaborates with TheraBiologics to develop NSC-mediated cancer therapeutics

GenVec, Inc. today announced that it has formed a collaboration with TheraBiologics to develop cancer therapeutics leveraging both GenVec's proprietary gene delivery platform and TheraBiologics' proprietary neural stem cell (NSC) technology. [More]
Study reveals functional heterogeneity of CD4 T cells in immune systems

Study reveals functional heterogeneity of CD4 T cells in immune systems

Utilizing a novel transgenic mouse model, Edward Usherwood, PhD of Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center and collaborators found that CD4 T cells divide into two different populations that each has a different job. One type performs antiviral functions, and the other survives life in the host. [More]
Pathogen may cause high levels of virulence in closely-related hosts

Pathogen may cause high levels of virulence in closely-related hosts

When viruses such as influenza and Ebola jump from one species to another, their ability to cause harm can change dramatically, but research from the University of Cambridge shows that it may be possible to predict the virus's virulence by looking at how deadly it is in closely-related species. [More]
Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate the emergence of vector-borne diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever, and West Nile virus in the UK, warn leading public health experts Dr Jolyon Medlock and Professor Steve Leach from the Emergency Response Department at Public Health England, writing in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. [More]
UZH researchers map spinal cord neurons involved in 'Gate Control Theory' of pain

UZH researchers map spinal cord neurons involved in 'Gate Control Theory' of pain

Sensing pain is extremely unpleasant and sometimes hard to bear - and pain can even become chronic. The perception of pain varies a lot depending on the context in which it is experienced. 50 years ago, neurobiologist Patrick Wall and psychologist Ronald Melzack formulated the so-called "Gate Control Theory" of pain. [More]
Researchers successfully generate cells of immune system to target, destroy cancer cells

Researchers successfully generate cells of immune system to target, destroy cancer cells

Researchers at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Berlin-Buch, have succeeded in generating cells of the immune system to specifically target and destroy cancer cells. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Life science researchers at Virginia Tech have accelerated a game-changing technology that's being used to study one of the planet's most lethal disease-carrying animals. [More]
Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Rice University bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses -- the stomach flu. [More]
Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

According to a meta-analysis published in BMC Family Practice, high dose zinc acetate lozenges shortened the duration of common-cold associated nasal discharge by 34%, nasal congestion by 37%, scratchy throat by 33%, and cough by 46%. [More]
'Turbocharged' protein holds promise in hemophilia gene therapy

'Turbocharged' protein holds promise in hemophilia gene therapy

Using gene therapy to produce a mutant human protein with unusually high blood-clotting power, scientists have successfully treated dogs with the bleeding disorder hemophilia, without triggering an unwanted immune response. [More]
Study describes the dual role of microRNA during hepatitis C infection

Study describes the dual role of microRNA during hepatitis C infection

In the battle between a cell and a virus, either side may resort to subterfuge. Molecular messages, which control the cellular machinery both sides need, are vulnerable to interception or forgery. [More]
TSRI researchers create picture of whole dynein-dynactin structure

TSRI researchers create picture of whole dynein-dynactin structure

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has determined the basic structural organization of a molecular motor that hauls cargoes and performs other critical functions within cells. [More]
Understanding strengths and weaknesses of hepatitis C viruses

Understanding strengths and weaknesses of hepatitis C viruses

Using a specially selected library of different hepatitis C viruses, a team of researchers led by Johns Hopkins scientists has identified tiny differences in the pathogens' outer shell proteins that underpin their resistance to antibodies. [More]
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