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First U.S. case of Ebola diagnosed in Texas

First U.S. case of Ebola diagnosed in Texas

The patient, who reportedly took a Sept. 20 commercial flight from Liberia to Dallas, represents the first case in the current outbreak diagnosed outside of Africa. [More]
Luminex gets FDA approval to add three new targets to xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel

Luminex gets FDA approval to add three new targets to xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel

Luminex Corporation today announced it has received U.S. FDA clearance to add three new targets to its xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP). The targets include Adenovirus 40/41, Entamoeba histolytica and Vibrio cholerae. [More]
Researchers create new Cas9 animal model for in vivo genome editing experiments

Researchers create new Cas9 animal model for in vivo genome editing experiments

Researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a new mouse model to simplify application of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for in vivo genome editing experiments. [More]
New findings could pave way for treating autoimmune diseases

New findings could pave way for treating autoimmune diseases

Scientists from A*STAR's Bioprocessing Technology Institute (BTI) have established a clearer relationship between two cells which serve our body's natural defence mechanisms against diseases and infections. [More]
Research findings provide clues for design of future HIV vaccine

Research findings provide clues for design of future HIV vaccine

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have described how a single family of antibodies that broadly neutralizes different strains of HIV has evolved remarkably diverse structures to attack a vulnerable site on the virus. [More]
Triple-punch of antibodies prevents, wipes out hepatitis C infection in laboratory mice

Triple-punch of antibodies prevents, wipes out hepatitis C infection in laboratory mice

A triple-punch of antibodies both prevented hepatitis C infection and wiped out the disease after it had established itself in laboratory mice, according to a study led by Princeton University researchers. [More]
C Diff Foundation to present 2014 "Raising C.difficile Awareness" conference in November

C Diff Foundation to present 2014 "Raising C.difficile Awareness" conference in November

C Diff Foundation is proud to present the 2014 "Raising C.difficile Awareness" conference. Join us November 4th at 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Student Center, West 828 S. Wolcott Avenue, Thompson Room, Chicago, IL. [More]
MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

In recent years, new strains of bacteria have emerged that resist even the most powerful antibiotics. Each year, these superbugs, including drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and staphylococcus, infect more than 2 million people nationwide, and kill at least 23,000. Despite the urgent need for new treatments, scientists have discovered very few new classes of antibiotics in the past decade. [More]
New research identifies novel cellular factors vital for CCHFV infection

New research identifies novel cellular factors vital for CCHFV infection

New research into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a tick-borne virus which causes a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans similar to that caused by Ebolavirus, has identified new cellular factors essential for CCHFV infection. [More]
MSU researchers show how bacterial immune systems fight off viruses

MSU researchers show how bacterial immune systems fight off viruses

When this week's print issue of the journal Science comes out, a collective cheer will go up from New Mexico, Montana and even the Netherlands, thanks to the type of collaborative effort that is more and more the norm in these connected times. Yes, the research was brilliant, and if we're lucky, it will produce innovations in biology, medicine, biotechnology and agriculture. It could save lives, and it happened because this scientist talked with that one, that one knew another one, and brilliant minds overcame geographic distance to advance human understanding. [More]
Researchers uncover new pathways that transport sugar molecules to cells

Researchers uncover new pathways that transport sugar molecules to cells

Sugar is a vital source of energy for both plants and animals alike. Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. [More]
T-bet protein fights off hepatitis infections

T-bet protein fights off hepatitis infections

A single protein may tip the balance between ridding the body of a dangerous virus and enduring life-long chronic infection, according to a report appearing in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Getting flu shot every autumn can lead to better health

Getting flu shot every autumn can lead to better health

Everyone knows that the best way to avoid the flu is by getting an annual flu shot. But a trip to your physician every autumn for the vaccination can help you avoid much more than the dreaded flu bug. "At the doctor's office, the focus is on you and what is going on with your health. This is your time to talk about concerns to improve your well-being beyond the flu season," says Jorge Parada, MD, MPH, the medical director of the Infection Prevention and Control Program at Loyola University Health System. [More]

New antiseptic agent holds promise for treatment of periodontitis

The study, published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, by Shinichi Arakawa and colleagues at Tokyo Medical and Dental University and Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, evaluated the bactericidal activities of ozone nano-bubble water - also known as NBW3 - against the two main bacterial agents that cause periodontitis as well as its toxicity to human oral tissue cells. [More]
NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

Ebola, MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome), malaria, antibiotic-resistant infections: Is our interaction with the environment somehow responsible for their increased incidence? [More]
AbbVie’s Phase 3 pivotal study shows HUMIRA is effective in reducing symptoms in HS

AbbVie’s Phase 3 pivotal study shows HUMIRA is effective in reducing symptoms in HS

AbbVie today announced results from a Phase 3 pivotal study demonstrating that HUMIRA® (adalimumab) is effective in reducing common clinical signs and symptoms in moderate-to-severe hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), specifically the number of abscesses and inflammatory nodules. [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Researchers explain why people with asthma have hard time dealing with respiratory viruses

Researchers explain why people with asthma have hard time dealing with respiratory viruses

People with asthma often have a hard time dealing with respiratory viruses such as the flu or the common cold, and researchers have struggled to explain why. [More]
Abbott technology may help identify severe infections sooner, lower health care costs

Abbott technology may help identify severe infections sooner, lower health care costs

A new study suggests a pioneering testing technology could reduce hospital stays by up to eight days and lower annual health care costs for people with serious infections by approximately $2.2 million (€1.5 million / £1.2 million). [More]
Novel virus could be source of severe respiratory disease in ball pythons

Novel virus could be source of severe respiratory disease in ball pythons

Researchers have identified a novel virus that could be the source of a severe, sometimes fatal respiratory disease that has been observed in captive ball pythons since the 1990s. The work is published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]