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Researchers exploring ways to stimulate patients' immune system to attack tumors

Researchers exploring ways to stimulate patients' immune system to attack tumors

Researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center are exploring ways to wake up the immune system so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells. Tumors protect themselves by tricking the immune system into accepting everything as normal, even while cancer cells are dividing and spreading. [More]
Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected. [More]
Newcomer among arboviruses: The zika virus

Newcomer among arboviruses: The zika virus

In the group of viruses that includes dengue and chikungunya, a newcomer now has people talking about it. Also originating in Africa, zika was isolated in humans in the 1970s. Several years earlier, only a few human cases had been reported. [More]
Study provides insights into interplay among bacteria, viruses and immune system during HIV infection

Study provides insights into interplay among bacteria, viruses and immune system during HIV infection

A new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute provides insights into the interplay among bacteria, viruses and the immune system during HIV infection. [More]
Antioxidant biomaterial helps vascular grafts heal

Antioxidant biomaterial helps vascular grafts heal

When a foreign material like a medical device or surgical implant is put inside the human body, the body always responds. According to Northwestern University's Guillermo Ameer, most of the time, that response can be negative and affect the device's function. [More]
More than half the world’s population is host to newly described gut virus

More than half the world’s population is host to newly described gut virus

Odds are, there-s a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found that more than half the world-s population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common types of gut bacteria, Bacteroidetes. [More]
Researchers develop sensing microbiosensor that detects beneficial bacteria in food

Researchers develop sensing microbiosensor that detects beneficial bacteria in food

In the food industry is very important to ensure the quality and safety of products consumed by the population to improve their properties and reduce foodborne illness. [More]
Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

ast week's burst of world disorder was ideal for a news dump, and the White House didn't disappoint: On no legal basis, all 4.5 million residents of the five U.S. territories were quietly released from ObamaCare. [More]
Viruses designed to kill cancer cells could boost effectiveness of chemotherapy to arms, legs

Viruses designed to kill cancer cells could boost effectiveness of chemotherapy to arms, legs

Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation, a new study reports. [More]
UT Southwestern researcher named recipient of ASBMB Merck Award for research on molecular biology

UT Southwestern researcher named recipient of ASBMB Merck Award for research on molecular biology

Dr. Zhijian "James" Chen, Professor of Molecular Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been named the 2015 recipient of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Merck Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to research in biochemistry and molecular biology. [More]
Researchers find viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1 using fossil virus

Researchers find viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1 using fossil virus

The road to finding a cure for HIV-1 is not without obstacles. However, thanks to cutting-edge research by Douglas Nixon, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues, performed at the George Washington University (GW), Oregon Health & Science University, the University of Rochester, and UC San Francisco, the scientific community is one step closer to finding a viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1, using an immune attack against a fossil virus buried in the genome. [More]
Researchers identify key explanation for why immune system unsuccessful in killing HIV virus

Researchers identify key explanation for why immune system unsuccessful in killing HIV virus

Our immune system contains CD8+ T cells which protect us from various diseases such as cancer and viruses. Some of them are specifically tasked with killing cells infected with the HIV virus - and researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, together with international colleagues, have for the first time identified a key explanation for why these cells are unsuccessful in their task. [More]
UH Case Medical Center signs agreement with ARUP to offer DEEPGEN-HIV test

UH Case Medical Center signs agreement with ARUP to offer DEEPGEN-HIV test

University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center has signed an agreement with ARUP Laboratories, a major national clinical reference laboratory that offers an extensive menu of highly complex and unique medical tests to hospitals, medical schools, and other nonprofit and commercial organizations throughout the United States. [More]
USAMRIID provides on-site laboratory support to current Ebola outbreak

USAMRIID provides on-site laboratory support to current Ebola outbreak

Analysis of clinical samples from suspected Lassa fever cases in Sierra Leone showed that about two-thirds of the patients had been exposed to other emerging diseases, and nearly nine percent tested positive for Ebola virus. [More]
CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR, a system of genes that bacteria use to fend off viruses, is involved in promoting antibiotic resistance in Francisella novicida, a close relative of the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]
CDC closes labs after anthrax, flu accidents

CDC closes labs after anthrax, flu accidents

Federal government labs in Atlanta were temporarily shut after it was discovered they had improperly sent potentially deadly pathogens, including anthrax, botulism and virulent bird flue virus, to other labs. [More]
First Edition: July 14, 2014

First Edition: July 14, 2014

Today's headlines include coverage of Medicare, the health law and veterans' care policy issues as well as reports from the campaign trail. [More]
CYD-TDV vaccine shows moderate protection against dengue in Asian children

CYD-TDV vaccine shows moderate protection against dengue in Asian children

The first dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) to reach phase 3 clinical testing has shown moderate protection (56%) against the disease in Asian children, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
New approach for developing personalized gene therapies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

New approach for developing personalized gene therapies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have created a way to develop personalized gene therapies for patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a leading cause of vision loss. [More]
Research into cell metabolism could open new therapeutic avenues for diabetes, cancer

Research into cell metabolism could open new therapeutic avenues for diabetes, cancer

More scientific research into the metabolism of stromal support cells and immune cells - and the role of the metabolism of these cell types in the development of diseases - could open new therapeutic avenues for diabetes, inflammatory conditions and cancer. That was the conclusion of a review article by scientists from VIB and KU Leuven in the leading journal Nature. [More]