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Scientists solve structure of BinAB toxin that kills larvae of certain type of mosquitoes

Scientists solve structure of BinAB toxin that kills larvae of certain type of mosquitoes

Could we get rid of mosquitoes without polluting the environment? Yes, we can! The BinAB toxin, produced in crystal form by a bacterium, specifically kills the larvae of Culex and Anopheles mosquitoes, but it is inactive on tiger mosquitoes (or Aedes), the vectors for dengue fever and chikungunya. [More]
Specific HPV strain linked to better overall survival for oropharyngeal cancer patients

Specific HPV strain linked to better overall survival for oropharyngeal cancer patients

When it comes to cancer-causing viruses like human papillomavirus, or HPV, researchers are continuing to find that infection with one strain may be better than another. [More]
Study offers unprecedented quantification of pathogens that cause childhood diarrhea

Study offers unprecedented quantification of pathogens that cause childhood diarrhea

New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites has been vastly underestimated. [More]
Super-resolution imaging of biological specimens: an interview with Dr. Manasa Gudheti

Super-resolution imaging of biological specimens: an interview with Dr. Manasa Gudheti

Traditional light microscopy techniques such as confocal and wide-field are diffraction-limited in resolution, which is about 200 nm laterally (in xy) and 500 to 600 nm axially (in z). Features that are closer than the diffraction limit will appear blurred in the image. [More]
Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies open new avenues for development of effective vaccine

Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies open new avenues for development of effective vaccine

A small number of people infected with HIV produce antibodies with an amazing effect: Not only are the antibodies directed against the own virus strain, but also against different sub-types of HIV that circulate worldwide. [More]
MU researcher awarded $3 million NIH grant to develop new drugs for treating HBV

MU researcher awarded $3 million NIH grant to develop new drugs for treating HBV

Hepatitis B (HBV) is a viral infection that increases the likelihood of developing liver cancer or liver failure. [More]
Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Clodagh O'Shea, an associate professor in the Salk Institute's Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, is among the first recipients of a grant from the Faculty Scholars Program, a new partnership of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Simons Foundation for early career researchers whose work shows the potential for groundbreaking contributions in their fields. [More]
New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

The number of cases of childhood diarrhoea attributable to pathogens (bacteria, parasites, viruses or other infections) have been substantially underestimated and may be nearly twice as high as previous analysis suggests, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
World leaders at UN meeting commit to develop action plans on antimicrobial resistance

World leaders at UN meeting commit to develop action plans on antimicrobial resistance

World leaders today signalled an unprecedented level of attention to curb the spread of infections that are resistant to antimicrobial medicines. [More]
Novel immunotherapy shows promise against AML in clinical trial

Novel immunotherapy shows promise against AML in clinical trial

A new type of immunotherapy shows promise against cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that recur after treatment or that never respond to therapy in the first place. [More]
Scientists engineer smallest-reported synthetic virus that may help advance gene therapy

Scientists engineer smallest-reported synthetic virus that may help advance gene therapy

Gene therapy is a kind of experimental treatment that is designed to fix faulty genetic material and help a patient fight off or recover from a disease. [More]
Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

My research lab studies several classes of systems. We are mostly interested in looking at large protein assemblies to understand their structure, dynamics and how their properties relate to their malfunction in disease. [More]
Mice study finds new antiviral that can control flu infection

Mice study finds new antiviral that can control flu infection

A molecule the body produces naturally in response to virus infection could be a viable flu treatment in the future, suggest researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London. [More]
Researchers develop innovative technique for detecting HIV hiding places in infected patients

Researchers develop innovative technique for detecting HIV hiding places in infected patients

Discovery of a novel, advanced technique to identify the rare cells where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hides in patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). This is an important step forward in the search for a HIV/AIDS cure. [More]
New less invasive method could detect bacterial infection in young febrile infants

New less invasive method could detect bacterial infection in young febrile infants

Physicians from Children's Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University, UC Davis Medical Center and Nationwide Children's Hospital, in collaboration with 19 other pediatric emergency departments around the country, have established a "proof of principle" for measuring patterns of ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression in the bloodstream that can enable clinicians to distinguish bacterial infections from other causes of fever in infants up to two months old. [More]
Researchers explain novel approach for analyzing diverse immune responses

Researchers explain novel approach for analyzing diverse immune responses

The response to infection is highly variable from one individual to another. The Milieu Intérieur consortium, coordinated by Prof. Matthew Albert (Immunobiology of dendritic cells Unit, Institut Pasteur / Inserm) and Dr Lluis Quintana-Murci (Human Evolutionary Genetics Unit, Institut Pasteur / CNRS) seek to establish the parameters that characterize the immune system of healthy individuals and its natural variability. [More]
Scientists use computer model to explore geographical origins of influenza virus

Scientists use computer model to explore geographical origins of influenza virus

A computer model developed by scientists at the University of Chicago shows that small increases in transmission rates of the seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2) can lead to rapid evolution of new strains that spread globally through human populations. [More]
Discovery of immune antibody could lead to development of improved influenza vaccines

Discovery of immune antibody could lead to development of improved influenza vaccines

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators report they have discovered a type of immune antibody that can rapidly evolve to neutralize a wide array of influenza virus strains - including those the body hasn't yet encountered. [More]
Study shows holes in HIV's protective glycan shield could be vital in designing vaccine candidates

Study shows holes in HIV's protective glycan shield could be vital in designing vaccine candidates

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute shows that "holes" in HIV's defensive sugar shield could be important in designing an HIV vaccine. [More]
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