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Scientists provide specific recommendations to reduce health risks for beachgoers

Scientists provide specific recommendations to reduce health risks for beachgoers

Beach sand contains all kinds of microorganisms, including those that can harm human health. Yet current guidelines are focused exclusively on monitoring the levels of microbes in the water. [More]
Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV leads to development of AIDS

Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV leads to development of AIDS

Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes have revealed that HIV does not cause AIDS by the virus's direct effect on the host's immune cells, but rather through the cells' lethal influence on one another. [More]
Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers targeting colorectal cancer stem cells - the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse - have discovered a mechanism to mimic a virus and potentially trigger an immune response to fight the cancer like an infection. [More]
Discovery could open up door for cancer research and treatment

Discovery could open up door for cancer research and treatment

Florida State University researchers have taken a big step forward in the fight against cancer with a discovery that could open up the door for new research and treatment options. [More]
Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

More than a cause of a simple infection, viruses are often involved in the development of serious diseases. Such is the case with liver cancer, which often develops in an organ that has been weakened by hepatitis B or C virus. [More]
Researchers find way to trigger 'virus alert' that may help boost drug's ability to prevent cancer cells

Researchers find way to trigger 'virus alert' that may help boost drug's ability to prevent cancer cells

Working with human cancer cell lines and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and elsewhere have found a way to trigger a type of immune system "virus alert" that may one day boost cancer patients' response to immunotherapy drugs. An increasingly promising focus of cancer research, the drugs are designed to disarm cancer cells' ability to avoid detection and destruction by the immune system. [More]
Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Every organism--from a seedling to a president--must protect its DNA at all costs, but precisely how a cell distinguishes between damage to its own DNA and the foreign DNA of an invading virus has remained a mystery. [More]
Enrollment completed for REOLYSIN Phase II study in patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC

Enrollment completed for REOLYSIN Phase II study in patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC

Oncolytics Biotech Inc. today announced that enrollment has been completed in a randomized Phase II study of REOLYSIN in patients with previously treated advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer ("NSCLC") (IND 211). The trial is being sponsored and conducted by the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (NCIC CTG) at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. [More]
Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
Pitt and Drexel researchers team up with NIH to investigate persistence of Ebola virus in wastewater

Pitt and Drexel researchers team up with NIH to investigate persistence of Ebola virus in wastewater

The historic outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa that began in March 2014 and has killed more than 11,000 people since, has raised new questions about the resilience of the virus and tested scientists' understanding of how to contain it. The latest discovery by a group of microbial risk-assessment and virology researchers suggests that the procedures for disposal of Ebola-contaminated liquid waste might underestimate the virus' ability to survive in wastewater. [More]
GW researchers find potential link between microbes in the throat and schizophrenia

GW researchers find potential link between microbes in the throat and schizophrenia

In the most comprehensive study to date, researchers at the George Washington University have identified a potential link between microbes (viruses, bacteria and fungi) in the throat and schizophrenia. This link may offer a way to identify causes and develop treatments of the disease and lead to new diagnostic tests. [More]
Researchers discover new hepatitis A-like virus in seals

Researchers discover new hepatitis A-like virus in seals

Scientists in the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have discovered a new virus in seals that is the closest known relative of the human hepatitis A virus. The finding provides new clues on the emergence of hepatitis A. [More]
Shire enters into agreement with Sanquin for CINRYZE

Shire enters into agreement with Sanquin for CINRYZE

Shire plc announced today it has entered into an agreement with Sanquin Blood Supply, the manufacturer of CINRYZE (C1 esterase inhibitor [human]), providing Shire access to its manufacturing technology and allowing Shire to source additional manufacturers to meet the growing demand for CINRYZE. [More]
TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
Gene delivery services expanded for adeno-associated virus

Gene delivery services expanded for adeno-associated virus

AMSBIO has introduced an expanded range of Adeno-associated virus (AAV) cloning and packaging services. [More]
Three projects that focus on improving global health win DEBUT Challenge

Three projects that focus on improving global health win DEBUT Challenge

Three unique projects focused on improving global health won the National Institutes of Health's Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) Challenge. The winners showed exemplary initiative in designing tools for a less expensive, portable device to monitor HIV treatment, a new surgical clamp to treat drooping eyelids, and a low-cost patient monitor. [More]
Study sheds light on helper cells and killer cells

Study sheds light on helper cells and killer cells

Scientists at the University of Bonn, together with colleagues from the USA and Japan, have shed light on an important immune mechanism. Their work shows how the body provides the important killer cells with a helper in the case of an infection. The study could point the way to better vaccines in the future. [More]
Researchers identify strategy to prevent adenoviruses from multiplying and causing sickness in humans

Researchers identify strategy to prevent adenoviruses from multiplying and causing sickness in humans

Using an animal model they developed, Saint Louis University and Utah State university researchers have identified a strategy that could keep a common group of viruses called adenoviruses from replicating and causing sickness in humans. [More]
Social and environmental processes linked to 2009 H1N1 pandemic outbreaks in Mexico

Social and environmental processes linked to 2009 H1N1 pandemic outbreaks in Mexico

Scientists studying the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic have found that the inconsistent regional timing of pandemic waves in Mexico was the result of interactions between school breaks and regional variations in humidity. [More]
Wyss Institute scientists develop improved blood-cleansing therapeutic device to treat sepsis

Wyss Institute scientists develop improved blood-cleansing therapeutic device to treat sepsis

Last year, a Wyss Institute team of scientists described the development of a new device to treat sepsis that works by mimicking our spleen. It cleanses pathogens and toxins from blood circulating through a dialysis-like circuit. Now, the Wyss Institute team has developed an improved device that synergizes with conventional antibiotic therapies and that has been streamlined to better position it for near-term translation to the clinic. [More]
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