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Studies on role of vitamin A in heart health have drawn opposite conclusions

Studies on role of vitamin A in heart health have drawn opposite conclusions

Vitamin A is involved in many bodily processes, including vision and skin health, but its role in the heart is unclear. While vitamin A is critical for heart development of embryos—vitamin A deficiency during pregnancy leads to an abnormal heart and prenatal death—studies on vitamin A's role in heart health have drawn opposite conclusions. [More]
Latest popular diets have nutrient gaps

Latest popular diets have nutrient gaps

Paleo, high-protein, low-carb, gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan eating lifestyles have all exploded in popularity in the last few years. Whether people adopt these diets in order to lose weight or maintain overall wellness, consumers that follow them may be missing out on some essential nutrients. In the April issue of Food Technology Magazine, Linda Mila Ohr writes about the nutrient gaps in these various diets and how consumers can make sure they get the nutrients they need. [More]
Low levels of vitamin D, methylation in black teens may increase cancer risk

Low levels of vitamin D, methylation in black teens may increase cancer risk

Low levels of vitamin D in black teens correlates with low activity of a major mechanism for controlling gene expression that may increase their risk of cancer and other disease, researchers report. [More]
Nutritional supplements can enhance effectiveness of antidepressants

Nutritional supplements can enhance effectiveness of antidepressants

An international evidence review has found that certain nutritional supplements can increase the effectiveness of antidepressants for people with clinical depression. [More]
New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

Patients, especially children, who undergo blood transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria. A new trial, published in The Lancet today, suggests that treating donated blood with a new technology that combines UV radiation and vitamin B is safe and could minimise the risk of malaria infection following blood transfusions. [More]
RA patients more likely to experience hearing loss

RA patients more likely to experience hearing loss

RA is the commonest autoimmune arthritis affecting 1% of the general population. Despite its main articular manifestations, RA caninvolveextra-articular organs including the auditory system. [More]
Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D highly prevalent among children with type 1 diabetes

Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D highly prevalent among children with type 1 diabetes

During the past two decades, vitamin D status, defined as serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, has emerged as a predictor of key clinical outcomes including bone health, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, immune health and survival. [More]
Adding CYP24A1 inhibitors may improve antitumor activity of vitamin D

Adding CYP24A1 inhibitors may improve antitumor activity of vitamin D

Roswell Park Cancer Institute research on the most potent form of vitamin D, commonly called calcitriol, offers new insights into approaches that may enhance the antitumor activity of this much-studied human hormone. [More]
Noise in concentration of vitamin A derivative RA can lead to disruptions in brain development

Noise in concentration of vitamin A derivative RA can lead to disruptions in brain development

Using cutting-edge imaging technology, University of California, Irvine biologists have determined that uncontrolled fluctuations (known at "noise) in the concentration of the vitamin A derivative Retinoic acid (RA) can lead to disruptions in brain organization during development. [More]
New oral blood thinners can decrease stroke risk in atrial fibrillation patients without frequent monitoring

New oral blood thinners can decrease stroke risk in atrial fibrillation patients without frequent monitoring

A new generation of blood thinners can reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, without requiring frequent monitoring and dietary restrictions. [More]
Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that higher levels of vitamin D - specifically serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D - are associated with a correspondingly reduced risk of cancer. The findings are published in the April 6, online issue of PLOS ONE. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

There's no getting around it: Simply getting around is a major issue for older adults.
"People are in nursing homes for two reasons, either they can't think or they can't walk," said Stephen Kritchevsky, Ph.D., director of the Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. North Carolina. "We're working very hard on the thinking part, and the walking part is equally important. [More]
Award-winning vitamin D oral spray could help improve heart function

Award-winning vitamin D oral spray could help improve heart function

Relief from low vitamin D levels could now be just a spray away thanks to an award-winning vitamin D oral spray that could help boost the vitamin D levels of those with chronic heart failure, resulting in improved heart function, according to a recent study. [More]
Surgery better than widely used drugs for treating hyperparathyroidism

Surgery better than widely used drugs for treating hyperparathyroidism

While most cases of osteoporosis are caused by normal aging, another leading cause of the bone-loss disease is a condition called hyperparathyroidism, in which the parathyroid glands release an excessive amount of a hormone that regulates the body's calcium levels. [More]
ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

Children and teenagers who take stimulant drugs to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have lower bone density than their peers who do not take these medications, a new study finds. [More]
One in 10 people in UK believed to be vitamin B12 deficient

One in 10 people in UK believed to be vitamin B12 deficient

One in 10 people in the UK are believed to be deficient in vitamin B12 – that’s an astonishing six million people suffering from the consequences of having less than the optimum amount of B12 in their system. [More]
Mom needs to get more vitamin D during second trimester to reduce child's asthma risk

Mom needs to get more vitamin D during second trimester to reduce child's asthma risk

The best way to reduce a child's chances of developing asthma might be making sure Mom had enough vitamin D during the second trimester, a new study from the University of Kansas shows. [More]
BodyGuard wearable patch product shows superiority to common NSAID treatments in restoring joint function

BodyGuard wearable patch product shows superiority to common NSAID treatments in restoring joint function

Perth skin science technology company OBJ Limited is set to revolutionise treatment of joint injuries and osteoarthritis after its BodyGuard wearable patch product proved its superiority to the world-leading non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug product Voltaren. [More]
Couple's caffeinated beverage consumption can increase risk of miscarriage

Couple's caffeinated beverage consumption can increase risk of miscarriage

A woman is more likely to miscarry if she and her partner drink more than two caffeinated beverages a day during the weeks leading up to conception, according to a new study from researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Ohio State University, Columbus. [More]
Diet and lifestyle may play greater role than genetics in cataract development, severity

Diet and lifestyle may play greater role than genetics in cataract development, severity

A diet rich in vitamin C could cut risk of cataract progression by a third, suggests a study being published online today in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The research is also the first to show that diet and lifestyle may play a greater role than genetics in cataract development and severity. [More]
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