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Improving dietary fiber content in bread

Improving dietary fiber content in bread

There are two main types of bread, wholemeal, or brown, and white. But most people in Europe prefer white bread. That is a problem because white bread contains very little fibres. And the lack of dietary fibres in the European diet causes serious diseases like diabetes, obesity and even cancer. [More]
Canada's current vitamin D intake recommendations need to be re-evaluated: Study

Canada's current vitamin D intake recommendations need to be re-evaluated: Study

New research finds that current national vitamin D intake recommendations are too low and that body weight must be taken into account to determine the appropriate vitamin D dose in any given individual. This is currently not the case, posing a serious Canadian public health issue with significant cost and health impacts. [More]
Abnormal vitamin D, trace element levels may indicate asthma risk

Abnormal vitamin D, trace element levels may indicate asthma risk

Serum levels of vitamin D, copper and zinc could help identify infants with recurrent wheezing who are at risk of developing asthma, Turkish researchers suggest. [More]
New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

Before reaching for that daily antacid, you might consider what it's doing to the trillions of bugs living in your gut. A new Mayo Clinic study in the open access journal Microbiome shows that people who regularly take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have less diversity among their gut bacteria, putting them at increased risk for infections like clostridium difficile and pneumonia, in addition to vitamin deficiencies and bone fractures. [More]
Surgical membrane delivers healing action of vitamin A

Surgical membrane delivers healing action of vitamin A

When blood vessels are damaged through surgery, it can trigger an endless cycle of scarring and repair. [More]
Personalized dietary advice based on person's genetic makeup improves eating habits

Personalized dietary advice based on person's genetic makeup improves eating habits

Personalized dietary advice based on a person's genetic makeup improves eating habits compared to current "one-size-fits-all" dietary recommendations, says a University of Toronto researcher. [More]
New nanoparticles can simultaneously perform MRI and fluorescent imaging in living animals

New nanoparticles can simultaneously perform MRI and fluorescent imaging in living animals

MIT chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescent imaging in living animals. Such particles could help scientists to track specific molecules produced in the body, monitor a tumor's environment, or determine whether drugs have successfully reached their targets. [More]
University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

It's well known that battlefield explosions can cause hearing loss, but veterans may be surprised to learn that their vision may also suffer — sometimes weeks or months after combat exposure. [More]
Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Taking vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements may not reduce the risk of memory and thinking problems after all, according to a new study published in the November 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the largest to date to test long-term use of supplements and thinking and memory skills. [More]
Novel method could improve treatment for infants, young children suffering from HIV/AIDS

Novel method could improve treatment for infants, young children suffering from HIV/AIDS

A novel method of altering a protein in milk to bind with an antiretroviral drug promises to greatly improve treatment for infants and young children suffering from HIV/AIDS, according to a researcher in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. [More]
Study points to major role of obesity in triggering, prolonging autoimmune diseases

Study points to major role of obesity in triggering, prolonging autoimmune diseases

Autoimmune diseases like Crohn's Disease and multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks its own body rather than predatory invaders, affect 5-20% of the global community. A study published recently in Autoimmunity Reviews by Prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld, the Laura Schwarz-Kipp Chair for Research of Autoimmune Diseases at Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Head of Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases at Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, points to the major role obesity plays in triggering and prolonging these autoimmune diseases. [More]
School lunches have greater nutritional quality than packed lunches

School lunches have greater nutritional quality than packed lunches

Approximately 60% of the more than 50 million public elementary and secondary education students obtain a substantial portion of their daily calories from school lunches. The 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program (NSLP) nutritional standards govern what those students eat; for those who bring packed lunches, there are no nutritional standards, however. [More]
Hospira launches Paricalcitol Injection

Hospira launches Paricalcitol Injection

Hospira, Inc., the world's leading provider of injectable drugs and infusion technologies, today announced the launch of Paricalcitol Injection, a generic version of AbbVie's Zemplar. Hospira obtained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of paricalcitol on Oct. 21 and launched the product Nov. 1. [More]
Dietary supplement KoACT is superior to calcium, vitamin D for bone health, study reveals

Dietary supplement KoACT is superior to calcium, vitamin D for bone health, study reveals

A new study by a Florida State University researcher reveals that a new dietary supplement is superior to calcium and vitamin D when it comes to bone health. [More]
Study: Vitamin D deficiency more prevalent in neuromuscular conditions

Study: Vitamin D deficiency more prevalent in neuromuscular conditions

A study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine adds more credence to a growing awareness of the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in neuromuscular disease. [More]

Researchers explore association between vitamin A and neonatal health

The impact vitamin A has on newborns is virtually unknown, but Penn State nutrition researchers have published two papers that may provide a framework for future investigations of the vitamin and neonatal health. [More]
Hypocalcaemic seizure surveillance highlights UK public health policy failings

Hypocalcaemic seizure surveillance highlights UK public health policy failings

The occurrence of 91 confirmed or probable hypocalcaemic seizures in children with vitamin D deficiency over a 2-year period in the UK highlights a failure to promote appropriate supplementation. [More]
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
UMass Amherst epidemiologist investigates risk of early menopause

UMass Amherst epidemiologist investigates risk of early menopause

The estimated 10 percent of women in Western nations who enter menopause before age 45 have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as lower fertility. Now epidemiologist Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is conducting the first large study to investigate whether vitamin D deficiency, inflammatory factors, hormones and other factors are associated with risk of early menopause, funded by NIH. [More]
Most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended levels of key nutrients

Most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended levels of key nutrients

A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average. [More]