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Bacterial litmus test provides low-cost method to measure blood micronutrients

Bacterial litmus test provides low-cost method to measure blood micronutrients

A bacterium engineered to produce different pigments in response to varying levels of a micronutrient in blood samples could give health officials an inexpensive way to detect nutritional deficiencies in resource-limited areas of the world. [More]
SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

Last summer, SLU scientists made a breakthrough discovery about the way in which blood clots. Through X-ray crystallography, they solved the molecular structure of prothrombin, an important blood-clotting protein, revealing an unexpected, flexible role for a "linker" region that may be the key to developing better life-saving drugs. [More]
GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

The first-ever two-year outcomes from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) showcased at ESC Congress 2015 expose that all-cause death was the most frequent major event in more than 17,000 newly diagnosed AF patients, far exceeding the rate of stroke or major bleeding. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare announce results from landmark studies evaluating safety profile of XARELTO in NVAF patients

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare announce results from landmark studies evaluating safety profile of XARELTO in NVAF patients

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced results from PMSS (Post-Marketing Safety Surveillance) and XANTUS (XARELTO for Prevention of Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation), their landmark real-world studies evaluating the safety of XARELTO in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Vitamin D has been studied extensively in relation to bone health as well as cancer. Now, a team led by a researcher at the University at Buffalo has discovered that vitamin D may play a significant role in eye health, specifically in the possible prevention of age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, among women who are more genetically prone to developing the sight-damaging disease. [More]
Educational program does not influence patients’ adherence to apixaban anticoagulant

Educational program does not influence patients’ adherence to apixaban anticoagulant

Adherence to the oral anticoagulant apixaban among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) was no better for those who received an educational program compared to those who did not, results of the international, randomised AEGEAN trial show. [More]
Study shows lack of folic acid enrichment in Europe causes foaetal abnormalities

Study shows lack of folic acid enrichment in Europe causes foaetal abnormalities

A new international study shows that 5,000 foetuses in Europe annually are affected by spina bifida and other severe defects on the central nervous system. Seventy per cent of these pregnancies are terminated, while increased mortality and serious diseases affect the children who are born. At least half of the cases can be avoided by adding folic acid to staple foods as is already being done in seventy non-European countries. [More]
Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

A meta-analysis has identified the key modifiable factors associated with an increased or decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. [More]
Better drug design may soon be aided by Scripps scientists’ discoveries

Better drug design may soon be aided by Scripps scientists’ discoveries

For the first time, they have uncovered the structural details of how some proteins interact to turn two different signals into a single integrated output. These new findings could aid future drug design by giving scientists an edge in fine tuning the signal between these partnered proteins—and the drug’s course of action. [More]
New TSRI study may have important implications for better drug design

New TSRI study may have important implications for better drug design

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute Florida campus have uncovered the structural details of how some proteins interact to turn two different signals into a single integrated output. These new findings could aid future drug design by giving scientists an edge in fine tuning the signal between these partnered proteins—and the drug's course of action. [More]
GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

New analyses from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) will be presented at ESC Congress 2015 to be held in London, United Kingdom, from August 29 to September 2, 2015. [More]
Vitamin D supplements may help reduce risk of falls in homebound elderly

Vitamin D supplements may help reduce risk of falls in homebound elderly

Every year falls affect approximately one in three older adults living at home, with approximately one in 10 falls resulting in serious injury. Even if an injury does not occur, the fear of falling can lead to reduced activity and a loss of independence. [More]
NBTY signs agreement to acquire Dr. Organic

NBTY signs agreement to acquire Dr. Organic

NBTY, Inc., a global leader in vitamins, nutritional supplements and sports nutrition, today announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Dr. Organic, a leading naturally inspired skincare line in the UK. The deal is subject to customary closing conditions, and is expected to close later this year. [More]
‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

Many "medical foods" are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. However, such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored and managed, according to a research team led by scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Bio-fortification of sweet potatoes may help combat vitamin A deficiency in South Africa

Bio-fortification of sweet potatoes may help combat vitamin A deficiency in South Africa

Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in children. It also increases the risk of disease and death from severe infections, according to the World Health Organization. [More]
UK's first cross sector International Dementia Conference to take place in November 2015

UK's first cross sector International Dementia Conference to take place in November 2015

Taking place 3 - 4 November 2015 at Vox Birmingham, the UK's first cross sector International Dementia Conference will bring together leading figures from across the world and from a variety of different industry backgrounds to learn and share ideas on the best solutions to tackle this global issue. [More]
Experts explain how nutrition can influence inflammatory processes and help lower chronic diseases risk

Experts explain how nutrition can influence inflammatory processes and help lower chronic diseases risk

An unresolved inflammatory response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease development. Controlling inflammation is crucial to human health and a key future preventative and therapeutic target. In a recent ILSI Europe's article published in the British Journal of Nutrition, a coalition of experts explain how nutrition influences inflammatory processes and help reduce chronic diseases risk. [More]
BIDMC scientists discover new vitamin B3 pathway that regulates liver metabolism

BIDMC scientists discover new vitamin B3 pathway that regulates liver metabolism

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have identified a new vitamin B3 pathway that regulates liver metabolism. The discovery provides an opportunity to pursue the development of novel drug therapies to address obesity, type 2 diabetes and related metabolic diseases. [More]
Scientific consensus paper highlights health benefits of UV exposure and vitamin D

Scientific consensus paper highlights health benefits of UV exposure and vitamin D

The Journal of the American College of Nutrition is pleased to offer Open Access to a scientific consensus paper, Sunlight and Vitamin D: Necessary for Public Health, authored by scientists from the University of California, San Diego, Creighton University, Boston University Medical Center, and the Medical University of South Carolina, along with other research contributors. [More]
TSRI study shows antioxidants slow aging process, reduce risk of infection

TSRI study shows antioxidants slow aging process, reduce risk of infection

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shown how aging cripples the production of new immune cells, decreasing the immune system’s response to vaccines and putting the elderly at risk of infection. [More]
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