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Researchers explore impact of nutrients, probiotics before and during pregnancy on mothers and babies

Researchers explore impact of nutrients, probiotics before and during pregnancy on mothers and babies

Researchers in the United Kingdom (Southampton), Singapore and New Zealand (Auckland) from the EpiGen Global Research Consortium are to trial the use of a combination of nutrients and probiotics before and during pregnancy in a bid to improve the health of mothers and their babies. [More]
IOF, EOS to jointly hold Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting in Abu Dhabi

IOF, EOS to jointly hold Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting in Abu Dhabi

With a growing senior population and an increase in unhealthy lifestyles, the prevalence of osteoporosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is soaring in the Middle East and North African region. In response to the dramatic increase in these diseases within the region the International Osteoporosis Foundation, in cooperation with the Emirates Osteoporosis Society, will be holding the 3rd Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting from December 5-7, 2015 in Abu Dhabi. [More]
Nutrition vital for patients recovering from severe burns

Nutrition vital for patients recovering from severe burns

For someone recovering from severe burns, eating is often the last thing they want to do. However, burn specialists at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center say nutrition is so vital to their patients' recovery that they make it a quality indicator for patient care. [More]
Use of dicloxacillin linked to INR decrease in patients taking vitamin K antagonists

Use of dicloxacillin linked to INR decrease in patients taking vitamin K antagonists

Researchers have found an association between treatment with the antibiotic dicloxacillin and a decrease in international normalized ratio (INR; a measure of blood coagulation) levels among patients taking the vitamin K antagonists warfarin or phenprocoumon, according to a study in the July 21 issue of JAMA. [More]
New approach holds great promise for developing effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases

New approach holds great promise for developing effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases

Using existing drugs, such as lithium, to restore basic biological processes in human cells and animal models, researchers may have broken a long-standing logjam in devising effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases. [More]
Alternative approach to treat fatal blood clots found to be more effective in patients

Alternative approach to treat fatal blood clots found to be more effective in patients

Potentially fatal blood clots account for thousands of emergency room visits each year and often those patients are admitted to the hospital, treated with an injectable anticoagulant and monitored for a few days. [More]
New article examines nutritional needs of individuals with autism spectrum disorder

New article examines nutritional needs of individuals with autism spectrum disorder

About 1 in 88 children has an autism spectrum disorder. This represents a 78% increase in the incidence of autism spectrum disorder since 2002 (although some of the increase may be due to improved diagnostic capabilities). Individuals with an autism spectrum disorder may have poor nutrition because they often exhibit selective eating patterns as well as sensory sensitivity that predispose them to restrict their diets. [More]
Following restrictive sun exposure advice may be harmful to health

Following restrictive sun exposure advice may be harmful to health

Following restrictive sun exposure advice in countries with low solar intensity like Canada might in fact be harmful to your health, says the co-author of a new study on sunlight and vitamin D. [More]
Wayne State researchers explore effects of Tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil in ESRD patients

Wayne State researchers explore effects of Tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil in ESRD patients

End-stage renal disease (ERSD) is the last stage of chronic kidney disease where the kidneys function at under 10 to 15 percent of their normal capacity. At this stage, kidneys cannot effectively remove waste or excess fluid from the blood system, and dialysis or a kidney transplant is necessary to live. [More]
Middle classes from developing countries more vulnerable to develop diabetes due ancestral diets

Middle classes from developing countries more vulnerable to develop diabetes due ancestral diets

The middle classes from developing countries are more susceptible than western Caucasians to obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in today's changing environment. New research published today in Cell Metabolism from the University of Sydney in Australia, the National Centre for Cell Science and the DYP Medical College in Pune, India reveals this may be a result of the nutrition endured by their ancestors. [More]
Microbiota blocks the immune cells responsible for triggering allergies

Microbiota blocks the immune cells responsible for triggering allergies

The human body is inhabited by billions of symbiotic bacteria, carrying a diversity that is unique to each individual. The microbiota is involved in many mechanisms, including digestion, vitamin synthesis and host defense. [More]
Study looks at effects of three levels of vitamin D supplementation in overweight, obese blacks

Study looks at effects of three levels of vitamin D supplementation in overweight, obese blacks

The current recommended minimum daily dose of vitamin D is not sufficient to restore healthy vitamin D levels in overweight or obese blacks, researchers report. [More]
New research shows that risk of cardiovascular disease and early death falls due to vitamin C

New research shows that risk of cardiovascular disease and early death falls due to vitamin C

New research from the University of Copenhagen and Herlev and Gentofte Hospital shows that high vitamin C concentrations in the blood from the intake of fruit and vegetables are associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and early death. [More]
AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

In order to recognize and encourage cutting-edge research in key areas of orthopaedic sports medicine, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine will present ten research awards and seven grants during its Annual Meeting, July 9-12 in Orlando, FL. [More]
Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people with moderate vitamin B12 deficiency, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. [More]
NDSU researcher awarded $1.35 million research grant to develop targeted treatment for colorectal cancer

NDSU researcher awarded $1.35 million research grant to develop targeted treatment for colorectal cancer

A researcher at North Dakota State University, Fargo, is receiving a four-year $1.35 million research project grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health to develop a targeted treatment for colorectal cancer. [More]
Majority of consumers recognize that supplements can help meet nutrient needs

Majority of consumers recognize that supplements can help meet nutrient needs

The vast majority of consumers recognize that multivitamins, calcium and/or vitamin D supplements can help fill nutrient gaps but should not be viewed as replacements for a healthy diet, according to a new survey conducted on behalf of the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN). [More]
Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

A new analysis of dietary patterns among more than 100,000 Americans suggests that frequent consumption of citrus -- namely whole grapefruit and orange juice -- may be associated with an increased risk of melanoma. [More]
University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

A University of Georgia researcher is lead author on an international paper on folate biomarkers as part of an initiative to provide evidence-based guidance for the global nutrition and public health community. [More]

USANA Colombia receives 2015 Editors' Choice Award from NutriSearch

It's been nearly two years since USANA began operations in Colombia, and USANA Colombia has been named the sole GOLD Medal recipient for Colombian products in the recently released 2015 NutriSearch Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements for the Americas. [More]
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