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Tufts University researchers report that extra vitamin E can protect against pneumonia

Tufts University researchers report that extra vitamin E can protect against pneumonia

Extra vitamin E protected older mice from a bacterial infection that commonly causes pneumonia. Microbiologists and nutrition researchers from Tufts University report that the extra vitamin E helped regulate the mice's immune system. [More]
Children who skip meals more likely to have excess body fat, increased cardiometabolic risk

Children who skip meals more likely to have excess body fat, increased cardiometabolic risk

Children who skip main meals are more likely to have excess body fat and an increased cardiometabolic risk already at the age of 6 to 8 years, according to a Finnish study. A higher consumption of sugary drinks, red meat and low-fat margarine and a lower consumption of vegetable oil are also related to a higher cardiometabolic risk. [More]
CWRU researchers find mechanism that enables LRAT enzyme to store vitamin A

CWRU researchers find mechanism that enables LRAT enzyme to store vitamin A

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism that enables the enzyme Lecithin: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) to store vitamin A — a process that is indispensable for vision. [More]
Enzymatic activity essential for vision may provide target for drug transport

Enzymatic activity essential for vision may provide target for drug transport

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism that enables the enzyme Lecithin: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) to store vitamin A--a process that is indispensable for vision. [More]
Studies presented at ASH meeting compare new, standard-of-care treatments for blood clots

Studies presented at ASH meeting compare new, standard-of-care treatments for blood clots

Studies presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition compare new and standard-of-care treatments for blood clots and further illuminate clot risks in vulnerable populations, such as cancer patients. [More]
Amgen's XGEVA (denosumab) receives FDA approval for treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy

Amgen's XGEVA (denosumab) receives FDA approval for treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new indication for XGEVA (denosumab) for the treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM) refractory to bisphosphonate therapy. [More]
Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Physical activity increases oxidative stress, and therefore, as an antioxidant vitamin C might have particularly evident effects on people who are participating in vigorous exercise. In several studies, vitamin C administration attenuated the increases in oxidative stress markers caused by exercise. Furthermore, vitamin C is involved in the metabolism of histamine, prostaglandins, and cysteinyl leukotrienes, all of which appear to be mediators in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. [More]
New diagnostic system describes symptoms using the image of patient's tongue

New diagnostic system describes symptoms using the image of patient's tongue

Physicians often ask their patients to "Please stick out your tongue". The tongue can betray signs of illness, which combined with other symptoms such as a cough, fever, presence of jaundice, headache or bowel habits, can help the physician offer a diagnosis. For people in remote areas who do not have ready access to a physician, a new diagnostic system is reported in the International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology that works to combine the soft inputs of described symptoms with a digital analysis of an image of the patient's tongue. [More]
Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Daniel Thomas will be conducting a ground-breaking study to determine if cognitive decline due to memory-destroying Alzheimer's disease can begin to be reversed in 90 days by combating the root causes using an innovative combination of diet, exercise, vitamin supplements, hormone therapy, and intravenous nutrition. [More]
Pregnant women lacking vitamin E nearly twice as likely to have miscarriage

Pregnant women lacking vitamin E nearly twice as likely to have miscarriage

Pregnant women in Bangladesh with low levels of the most common form of vitamin E are nearly twice as likely to have a miscarriage than those with adequate levels of the vitamin in their blood, according to new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College and the Gladstone Institutes have found a way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in a mouse using a simple chemical compound that is a precursor to vitamin B3. This discovery has important implications not only for preventing hearing loss, but also potentially for treating some aging-related conditions that are linked to the same protein. [More]
Researchers find link between vitamin D deficiency and seasonal affective disorder

Researchers find link between vitamin D deficiency and seasonal affective disorder

Vitamin D deficiency is not just harmful to physical health--it also might impact mental health, according to a team of researchers that has found a link between seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, and a lack of sunlight. [More]
Researchers warn that Vitamin A deficiency can cause eye problems

Researchers warn that Vitamin A deficiency can cause eye problems

Obese patients who have undergone bariatric surgery to shed weight should take the supplements prescribed to them to protect their eyes. Taking in too little Vitamin A, in particular, could in some cases actually cause night blindness, dry eyes, corneal ulcers, and in extreme cases total blindness. This advice comes from Rui Azevedo Guerreiro and Rui Ribeiro of the Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central in Portugal, who reviewed what little research there currently is on the occurrence of eye conditions following bariatric surgery. [More]
CHFA reveals top five healthy holiday gift ideas

CHFA reveals top five healthy holiday gift ideas

Finding that perfect gift for health-conscious friends and family can be hard, but this holiday season, you can put those fears to rest. [More]
Improving dietary fiber content in bread

Improving dietary fiber content in bread

There are two main types of bread, wholemeal, or brown, and white. But most people in Europe prefer white bread. That is a problem because white bread contains very little fibres. And the lack of dietary fibres in the European diet causes serious diseases like diabetes, obesity and even cancer. [More]
Canada's current vitamin D intake recommendations need to be re-evaluated: Study

Canada's current vitamin D intake recommendations need to be re-evaluated: Study

New research finds that current national vitamin D intake recommendations are too low and that body weight must be taken into account to determine the appropriate vitamin D dose in any given individual. This is currently not the case, posing a serious Canadian public health issue with significant cost and health impacts. [More]
Abnormal vitamin D, trace element levels may indicate asthma risk

Abnormal vitamin D, trace element levels may indicate asthma risk

Serum levels of vitamin D, copper and zinc could help identify infants with recurrent wheezing who are at risk of developing asthma, Turkish researchers suggest. [More]
New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

Before reaching for that daily antacid, you might consider what it's doing to the trillions of bugs living in your gut. A new Mayo Clinic study in the open access journal Microbiome shows that people who regularly take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have less diversity among their gut bacteria, putting them at increased risk for infections like clostridium difficile and pneumonia, in addition to vitamin deficiencies and bone fractures. [More]
Surgical membrane delivers healing action of vitamin A

Surgical membrane delivers healing action of vitamin A

When blood vessels are damaged through surgery, it can trigger an endless cycle of scarring and repair. [More]
Personalized dietary advice based on person's genetic makeup improves eating habits

Personalized dietary advice based on person's genetic makeup improves eating habits

Personalized dietary advice based on a person's genetic makeup improves eating habits compared to current "one-size-fits-all" dietary recommendations, says a University of Toronto researcher. [More]