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Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

A study published recently in the IBD Journal found significant differences in hospital readmissions, medication usage, and both medical and surgical complications of children with Crohn's disease related to race. In the study, black children had a 1.5 times higher frequency of hospital readmissions because of Crohn's disease compared to white children. [More]
Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. [More]
Vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids may optimize brain serotonin concentrations and function

Vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids may optimize brain serotonin concentrations and function

Although essential marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been shown to improve cognitive function and behavior in the context of certain brain disorders, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. In a new paper published in FASEB Journal by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, serotonin is explained as the possible missing link tying together why vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids might ameliorate the symptoms associated with a broad array of brain disorders. [More]
Study: Plant compounds can help prevent liver damage during menopause

Study: Plant compounds can help prevent liver damage during menopause

Women going through menopause often struggle with weight gain that results when their estrogen levels drop, and many turn to weight-loss supplements to help them shed those extra pounds. But those supplements may cause an accumulation of fat in the liver and a potentially life-threatening condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. [More]
Researchers identify previously unknown effect of vitamin A in embryonic development

Researchers identify previously unknown effect of vitamin A in embryonic development

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a previously unknown effect of vitamin A in human embryonic development. Their findings show that vitamin A affects the formation of blood cells. [More]
Scientists detect new molecule that contributes to development of liver fibrosis

Scientists detect new molecule that contributes to development of liver fibrosis

Liver fibrosis, which is the progressive formation of scar tissue in the liver, is a massive medical problem. An estimated ten percent of the population is affected by liver fibrosis or its corresponding later stage, liver cirrhosis. A variety of causes can lead to liver fibrosis, the most widely recognized ones being alcohol consumption and virus-induced chronic liver inflammation. [More]
PCDS AC system optimizes delivery of anticoagulation drugs, reduces adverse events

PCDS AC system optimizes delivery of anticoagulation drugs, reduces adverse events

Point of Care Anticoagulation software (PCDS AC) optimizes delivery of anticoagulation drugs and reduces adverse events associated with anticoagulation therapy. The software was designed and developed in collaboration with leading clinical thrombosis experts, and is a decision support tool that takes the complexity out of AC management by providing a real-time AC dashboard. With intuitive, predictive clinical decision support, PCDS AC transforms evidence-based guidelines into intelligent tools that measure and improve AC therapy outcomes. [More]
Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as folate from food and vitamin E, than healthy people, according to a new study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
WHO urges affected countries to increase investment in tackling neglected tropical diseases

WHO urges affected countries to increase investment in tackling neglected tropical diseases

WHO urges affected countries to scale up their investment in tackling 17 neglected tropical diseases in order to improve the health and well-being of more than 1.5 billion people. This investment would represent as little as 0.1% of current domestic expenditure on health in affected low and middle income countries for the period 2015-2030. [More]
CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

Several Cancer Treatment Centers of America clinicians presented research from studies evaluating new cancer nutrition techniques and therapies at the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Nutrition Week held in Long Beach, Calif., February 14-17, 2015. CTCA clinicians led a plenary session and an oral abstract presentation, and presented eight posters to Clinical Nutrition Week attendees. [More]
California Strawberry Commission lists out 12 reasons to enjoy heart-healthy strawberries

California Strawberry Commission lists out 12 reasons to enjoy heart-healthy strawberries

February is Heart Health Month and just one of many reasons to add heart-healthy foods like strawberries to the daily diet. [More]
Winter weather may cause vitamin D deficiency

Winter weather may cause vitamin D deficiency

Residents of snowy, northern U.S. cities are at risk of vitamin D deficiency and worse, may not even know it. [More]
Health Canada to review Cipher’s self-adhesive medicated plaster, Beteflam Patch

Health Canada to review Cipher’s self-adhesive medicated plaster, Beteflam Patch

Cipher Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: CPHR; TSX:CPH) ("Cipher" or "the Company") today announced that the Beteflam Patch (previously called the Betesil® Patch) has been accepted for review by Health Canada. [More]
TINA.org objects to proposed class-action settlement regarding Wellesse glucosamine supplement

TINA.org objects to proposed class-action settlement regarding Wellesse glucosamine supplement

Continuing its efforts to fight for settlements that are fair to consumers and mandate real changes in deceptive marketing, advocacy group truthinadvertising.org (TINA.org) has filed an objection in a proposed class-action settlement involving the brand-name glucosamine supplement, Wellesse®. Sold at retailers nationwide, the supplement is advertised as a joint pain remedy to ease pain and even rebuild cartilage. [More]
First human clinical study of ChromaDex's NIAGEN nicotinamide riboside meets primary endpoint

First human clinical study of ChromaDex's NIAGEN nicotinamide riboside meets primary endpoint

ChromaDex Corp. announced today that the initial results of the first human clinical study for the company's NIAGEN nicotinamide riboside (NR) has met its primary endpoint. [More]
ATA recommends daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements for pregnant, breastfeeding women

ATA recommends daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements for pregnant, breastfeeding women

The American Thyroid Association has championed the effort to include a daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements intended for pregnant and breastfeeding women, and it applauds the new guidelines released by the U.S. Council for Responsible Nutrition advising manufacturers to include 150 micrograms of iodine to these daily supplements. [More]
Study shows link between low vitamin D levels in childhood and occurrence of atherosclerosis in adulthood

Study shows link between low vitamin D levels in childhood and occurrence of atherosclerosis in adulthood

Low levels of 25-OH vitamin D in childhood were associated with subclinical atherosclerosis over 25 years later in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
People living beside the sea have higher vitamin D levels

People living beside the sea have higher vitamin D levels

People living close to the coast in England have higher vitamin D levels than inland dwellers, according to a new study published in the journal Environment International. [More]
Ohio State allergy specialists study, learn more about eosinophilic esophagitis

Ohio State allergy specialists study, learn more about eosinophilic esophagitis

Its name is daunting. It's the hottest topic among allergy experts. It's showing up more and doctors don't yet know why. Allergy specialists at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are seeing more people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory response in the esophagus that makes it hard to swallow food. [More]
41% of the British population unaware of the role of diet in cancer development

41% of the British population unaware of the role of diet in cancer development

Surprising new statistics reveal that 41% of the British population are oblivious to the role that diet plays in the development of cancer - and even those with a family history of the disease are failing to consume potentially "cancer-preventing" compounds in their daily diet. [More]