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Specific intake levels of xanthohumol reduces obesity, cholesterol and elevated glucose

Specific intake levels of xanthohumol reduces obesity, cholesterol and elevated glucose

A recent study at Oregon State University has identified specific intake levels of xanthohumol, a natural flavonoid found in hops, that significantly improved some of the underlying markers of metabolic syndrome in laboratory animals and also reduced weight gain. [More]
Cutting energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods may help reduce cancer risk

Cutting energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods may help reduce cancer risk

Recent years have brought more attention to the role of carbohydrates in our diets and the differences between healthy and unhealthy carbs, most often in the context of weight control. A new study highlights one more reason to avoid sugary beverages, processed foods and other energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods—cutting them may help reduce your risk of cancer. [More]
Twitter-based smoking cessation programs twice as successful as traditional methods in helping smokers quit

Twitter-based smoking cessation programs twice as successful as traditional methods in helping smokers quit

A new study by researchers from UC Irvine and Stanford University found subjects in one of the first real-time, fully automated, Twitter-based smoking intervention programs - Tweet2Quit -- were twice as successful at kicking the habit as those using traditional methods. The new findings were recently published online in Tobacco Control, an international peer reviewed journal. The print version of the research is forthcoming. [More]
Intake of high-protein diet during weight loss improves sleep quality in adults

Intake of high-protein diet during weight loss improves sleep quality in adults

Overweight and obese adults who are losing weight with a high-protein diet are more likely to sleep better, according to new research from Purdue University. [More]
Researchers explore problem of obesity from the inside out

Researchers explore problem of obesity from the inside out

In the last 40 years, obesity has more than doubled around the world. In the United States, the average American is more than 24 pounds heavier today than in 1960. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and the University of Washington are studying the problem of obesity from the inside out. [More]
Community-based weight management program more effective in preventing prediabetes than self-initiated program

Community-based weight management program more effective in preventing prediabetes than self-initiated program

A new randomized controlled study conducted by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers and published online today in the American Journal of Public Health found that adults with prediabetes who followed a nationally-available weight management program with a prediabetes-specific component, Weight Watchers, lost significantly more weight and experienced better blood glucose control than those following a self-initiated program using supplemental counseling materials. [More]
Cornell Food and Brand Lab researchers develop online Global Healthy Weight Registry

Cornell Food and Brand Lab researchers develop online Global Healthy Weight Registry

To shed light on the health behaviors of those who maintain a healthy weight, Cornell Food and Brand Lab researchers developed an online Global Healthy Weight Registry (formerly named the Slim by Design Registry). Adults of healthy weight were invited to sign up for the registry and then answer questions about diet, exercise, and daily routines (see the infographic for more details about registry participants). [More]
Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Components in red raspberries may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic stabilizing activity, according to a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature published in the January issue of Advances in Nutrition. [More]
Early puberty may increase risk of developing gestational diabetes

Early puberty may increase risk of developing gestational diabetes

Women who began having menstrual cycles at a younger age are at greater risk of developing gestational diabetes, a disease affecting up to 7 percent of pregnant women that can cause babies to develop type 2 diabetes and other complications, new research shows. [More]
Ageing 2016 summit to explore various aspects of processes, research on ageing and senescence

Ageing 2016 summit to explore various aspects of processes, research on ageing and senescence

Ageing 2016 will be held from February 9 to 11, 2016 at Cineworld: The O2 Peninsula Square London SE10 0DX United Kingdom. The annual international summit will look at the various aspects of processes and research involved in ageing and senescence. [More]
Self-weighing may have negative psychological outcomes for young women

Self-weighing may have negative psychological outcomes for young women

Self-weighing can be a useful tool to help adults control their weight, but for adolescents and young adults this behavior may have negative psychological outcomes. Researchers from the University of Minnesota tracked the self-weighing behaviors of more than 1,900 young adults as part of Project EAT (Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults) and found increases in self-weighing to be significantly related to increases in weight concern and depression and decreases in body satisfaction and self-esteem among females. [More]
Study reveals potential limitations of app-based approach to weight loss

Study reveals potential limitations of app-based approach to weight loss

Used alone, a cell phone app that tracks exercise, calories and weight loss goals is, on average, not enough to create meaningful weight loss in young adults, according to new research from Duke Medicine. [More]
Miriam Hospital enrolling local participants for Parachute implant clinical trial to treat heart failure

Miriam Hospital enrolling local participants for Parachute implant clinical trial to treat heart failure

The Miriam Hospital is actively recruiting local participants for a U.S. clinical trial of the Parachute device for treating heart failure. The study is focused on determining if the new minimally invasive catheter-based device can slow the progression of heart failure, reduce repeat hospitalizations and death, and significantly improve quality of life for patients who experience enlargement of the left ventricle after a heart attack. [More]
Melatonin and the circadian rhythm: an interview with Professor Kennaway, University of Adelaide

Melatonin and the circadian rhythm: an interview with Professor Kennaway, University of Adelaide

The production of melatonin is controlled by a part of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and its timing fine-tuned by our exposure to light during the morning. [More]
UL study finds Irish mothers struggle to recognise overweight or obesity in their children

UL study finds Irish mothers struggle to recognise overweight or obesity in their children

A University of Limerick study has found that mothers of overweight and obese children struggle to recognize their child as overweight or obese. The study reported on 7,655 mothers and their nine year old children using data from the national longitudinal study of children, Growing Up in Ireland. [More]
The Center for Bariatric Surgery receives MBSAQIP accreditation for safe, high-quality bariatric patient care

The Center for Bariatric Surgery receives MBSAQIP accreditation for safe, high-quality bariatric patient care

The Center for Bariatric Surgery has earned certification for adult and teen weight loss surgery under the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) which sets standards for safe, high-quality bariatric patient care. [More]
Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

What do a prominent physiologist and two-time survivor of pancreatic cancer and a world-renowned researcher whose landmark discoveries on aspirin, drug therapies of proven benefit and therapeutic lifestyle changes that have saved more than 1.1 million lives have in common? They are both passionate about the importance of regular physical activity in reducing risks of dying from heart attacks and strokes, as well as developing diabetes, hypertension and colon cancer. And more importantly, enhancing mental health and fostering healthy muscles, bones and joints in all Americans from childhood to the elderly. [More]
Simple lifestyle intervention can help prevent gestational diabetes in high-risk women

Simple lifestyle intervention can help prevent gestational diabetes in high-risk women

Gestational diabetes can be prevented by a simple, easily applicable individualized lifestyle intervention in high-risk women, finds a study led by Helsinki University Hospital and South Karelia Central Hospital, Finland. The results of the study are promising, and in line with previous published T2D prevention studies. The findings may have major health consequences for both the mother and the child. [More]
Parents with low health literacy less likely to select recommended weight-control strategies for children

Parents with low health literacy less likely to select recommended weight-control strategies for children

Parents who have low health literacy are less likely to choose government-recommended weight-loss strategies, such as increasing physical activity or serving more fruits and vegetables, to help their children control their weight than parents who are better able to understand basic health-related information, a new study suggests. [More]
UTHealth School of Public Health working to improve health of Hispanics living along Texas-Mexico border

UTHealth School of Public Health working to improve health of Hispanics living along Texas-Mexico border

Sylvia Hernando became a Community Health Worker (CHW) because she wanted to help others. Hernando had been a stay-at-home mother and was looking to go back to school when she heard about the CHW certification program at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
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