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Workplace wellness programs can help people lose weight

Workplace wellness programs can help people lose weight

A new study shows that workplace wellness programs can be effective in helping people lose weight by providing healthier food choices and increasing opportunities for physical activity, particularly if these efforts are designed with the input and active participation of employees. [More]
Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity. [More]
Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Study: Teens who perceive themselves as overweight are at greater risk of obesity as adults

Study: Teens who perceive themselves as overweight are at greater risk of obesity as adults

Teens who mistakenly perceive themselves as overweight are actually at greater risk of obesity as adults, according to research findings forthcoming in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Oatmeal breakfast results in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories intake at lunch

Oatmeal breakfast results in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories intake at lunch

A new study suggests that your breakfast cereal choice may affect how full you feel and how much you eat for lunch, especially if you're overweight. According to new research published in the latest issue of the Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, scientists found that having oatmeal (Quaker Oats Quick 1-minuteā„¢) for breakfast resulted in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories eaten at the next meal compared to a calorie-matched breakfast of a ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) - sugared corn flakes. [More]
Medifast recognized as a 2015 Future 50 Blue Chip company by SmartCEO magazine

Medifast recognized as a 2015 Future 50 Blue Chip company by SmartCEO magazine

Medifast, Inc., a leading United States manufacturer and provider of clinically proven, weight-loss and healthy living products and programs is proud to be recognized by SmartCEO magazine as a 2015 Future 50 Blue Chip company for the fourth consecutive year. [More]
DAA encourages Australians to ditch fad diets, focus on healthy eating habits

DAA encourages Australians to ditch fad diets, focus on healthy eating habits

According to Australia's latest National Nutrition Survey, more than 2.3 million Australians (13%) aged 15 years and older say they are on a diet to lose weight or to improve their health. But the Dietitians Association of Australia is encouraging Australians to ditch fad diets this year, and focus on achieving healthy eating habits and a healthy weight by making changes they can keep up long term. [More]
Maintaining weight loss over long term can be a major challenge

Maintaining weight loss over long term can be a major challenge

A new report combining perspectives from a range of obesity experts identifies genetic, epigenetic and neuro-hormonal differences between individuals as one of the key challenges associated with weight loss and long-term weight control. [More]
People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems during the next 20 years than those with healthy blood sugar levels, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Breast size differences have significant mental health impact in adolescent girls

Breast size differences have significant mental health impact in adolescent girls

Differences in breast size have a significant mental health impact in adolescent girls, affecting self-esteem, emotional well-being, and social functioning, reports the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

Almost one third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight. This can influence their eating habits and, consequently, their health, according to a study led by the UAB and conducted with 600 teenage boys from Barcelona and surrounding areas. [More]
BMI plays role in rheumatoid arthritis patients' ability to achieve sustained remission

BMI plays role in rheumatoid arthritis patients' ability to achieve sustained remission

A study by Hospital for Special Surgery researchers finds that body mass index (BMI) plays a role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients' ability to achieve a sustained remission. Looking at patients who had received an RA diagnosis within the past 12 months, investigators found that those who were significantly underweight or overweight/obese were the least likely to remain in remission. [More]
New research finds prevalence of obesity among teens with disabilities

New research finds prevalence of obesity among teens with disabilities

Teens with physical or mental disabilities are more likely to be obese compared to adolescents without disabilities, according to new research presented today at the American Public Health Association's 142nd Annual Meeting in New Orleans. [More]
Prescription opioids involved in 67.8% of nationwide ED visits in 2010, find researchers

Prescription opioids involved in 67.8% of nationwide ED visits in 2010, find researchers

Researchers from Rhode Island and The Miriam hospitals and the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that prescription opioids, including methadone, were involved in 67.8 percent of (or over 135,971 visits to) nationwide emergency department (ED) visits in 2010, with the highest proportion of opioid overdoses occurring in the South. [More]
Novo Nordisk announces re-launch of online patient support platform for people with diabetes

Novo Nordisk announces re-launch of online patient support platform for people with diabetes

Novo Nordisk, a world leader in diabetes care, today announced the re-launch of Cornerstones4Care, an award-winning online patient support platform for people living with diabetes. [More]
Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies. Their research indicates that newborns of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy show lower levels of stress hormones, lowered stress response, and alterations in DNA for a gene that regulates passage of stress hormones from mother to fetus. [More]
New study suggests that family meals may be protective against obesity

New study suggests that family meals may be protective against obesity

Increasing rates of adolescent obesity and the likelihood that obesity will carry forward into adulthood, have led to various preventive initiatives. It has been suggested that family meals, which tend to include fruits, vegetables, calcium, and whole grains, could be protective against obesity. [More]
Women who accept their imperfections may experience more positive body image

Women who accept their imperfections may experience more positive body image

Women who accept and tolerate their imperfections appear to have a more positive body image despite their body mass index (BMI) and are better able to handle personal disappointments and setbacks in their daily lives. [More]
The Miriam Hospital receives Primary Stroke Center certification for fifth consecutive year

The Miriam Hospital receives Primary Stroke Center certification for fifth consecutive year

The Miriam Hospital has for the fifth time been designated by the Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center. [More]
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