Weight Loss News and Research RSS Feed - Weight Loss News and Research

One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

Almost one third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight. This can influence their eating habits and, consequently, their health, according to a study led by the UAB and conducted with 600 teenage boys from Barcelona and surrounding areas. [More]
Researchers present results of The Heart of New Ulm Project at AHA Scientific Sessions

Researchers present results of The Heart of New Ulm Project at AHA Scientific Sessions

Researchers from Allina Health and the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation have presented on the results and implications of The Heart of New Ulm Project on heart disease risk factors at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Study finds that fat around heart closely associated with atrial fibrillation

Study finds that fat around heart closely associated with atrial fibrillation

Obesity is a known risk factor for atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. [More]
Study finds link between body weight change and hip fracture risk among Singapore Chinese

Study finds link between body weight change and hip fracture risk among Singapore Chinese

While a low body mass index (BMI) of less than 20 kg/m2 has been shown to be an independent risk factor for hip fractures, far less is known about the relationship of body weight changes on hip fracture risk. [More]
New research finds prevalence of obesity among teens with disabilities

New research finds prevalence of obesity among teens with disabilities

Teens with physical or mental disabilities are more likely to be obese compared to adolescents without disabilities, according to new research presented today at the American Public Health Association's 142nd Annual Meeting in New Orleans. [More]
Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes, once considered a high-risk procedure, carries a complication and mortality rate comparable to some of the safest and most commonly performed surgeries in America, including gallbladder surgery, appendectomy, and total knee replacement, according to new research from the Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute. [More]
New wearable device can automatically track diet

New wearable device can automatically track diet

Sensors and software used to track physical activity are increasingly popular, as smart phones and their apps become more powerful and sophisticated, but, when it comes to food, they all rely on the user to report meals. [More]
Obeticholic acid improves liver health in people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

Obeticholic acid improves liver health in people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

An experimental drug aimed at treating a common liver disease showed promising results and potential problems in a multicenter clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. The FLINT study found that people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) who took obeticholic acid (OCA) had improved liver health during that period, including decreased inflammation and fat in the liver and decreased body weight versus people receiving a placebo. OCA was also associated with increases in itching and total cholesterol. [More]
Study provides new insight on taste change after bariatric surgery

Study provides new insight on taste change after bariatric surgery

People with obesity may have an unexpected ally after weight-loss surgery: their tongues. New research from the Stanford University School of Medicine finds patients who reported a decrease in taste intensity after bariatric surgery had significantly higher excess weight loss after three months than those whose taste intensity became higher. [More]
New research suggests that brain aging can be postponed if placed on a high-fat diet

New research suggests that brain aging can be postponed if placed on a high-fat diet

New Danish-led research suggests that signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if placed on a high-fat diet. In the long term, this opens the possibility of treatment of children suffering from premature aging and patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The research project is headed by the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen and the National Institute of Health. [More]
Researchers explore why many patients opt out of bariatric surgical procedure

Researchers explore why many patients opt out of bariatric surgical procedure

Researchers from the University Health Network in Toronto are hoping to improve the operational efficiency of bariatric surgery programs to increase access to care. Studies have shown that bariatric operations can alleviate chronic health issues like diabetes and arthritis for extremely obese people. [More]
Modern bariatric surgery can cut medications in obesity patients

Modern bariatric surgery can cut medications in obesity patients

Patients with obesity take significantly fewer medications after weight-loss surgery than their non-surgical counterparts, and end up spending 22.4 percent less on drugs for diabetes and heart disease after four years, according to new research. [More]
Study shows that 140 million American adults recommended for behavioral weight-loss treatment

Study shows that 140 million American adults recommended for behavioral weight-loss treatment

New research shows that 140 million American adults - about 65 percent - are recommended for behavioral weight-loss treatment, with 83% of those (or 116 million) considered for pharmacotherapy. [More]
High-fat, low-carb diets may help control epilepsy

High-fat, low-carb diets may help control epilepsy

Diets high in fat and low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet, may reduce seizures in adults with tough-to-treat epilepsy, according to a review of the research published in the October 29, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study shows that obese children may mistake asthma symptoms, overuse rescue medications

Study shows that obese children may mistake asthma symptoms, overuse rescue medications

New research shows obese children with asthma may mistake symptoms of breathlessness for loss of asthma control leading to high and unnecessary use of rescue medications. The study was published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the official scientific journal of the American Association of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. [More]
Research shows FGF21 hormone acts directly on brain to regulate obesity

Research shows FGF21 hormone acts directly on brain to regulate obesity

A hormone seen as a popular target to develop weight-loss drugs works by directly targeting the brain and triggering previously unknown activity in the nervous system, UT Southwestern Medical Center obesity researchers have found. [More]
Report: Wide variation in state exchange plans' covered benefits

Report: Wide variation in state exchange plans' covered benefits

University of Pennsylvania researchers find that the variations are significant. Other news about the online health marketplaces that open next month include Oregon's decision to ditch the old system for Medicaid enrollment, a review of navigators' roles in Georgia, and Maryland officials' assurances that their system will be ready. [More]
Practical indicators encourage habit changes more than calorific value

Practical indicators encourage habit changes more than calorific value

The Affordable Care Act includes laws to help the public know the nutritional value of the food they buy. Consequently, larger chain restaurants will be required to indicate the calories count next to items on their menus. However, a study published yesterday suggests that this may not be the best way to encourage healthier eating habits. [More]
A low-cost way to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages

A low-cost way to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages

Adolescents who saw printed signs explaining the number of miles they would need to walk to burn off the calories in a sugary drink were more likely to leave the store with a lower calorie beverage, a healthier beverage or a smaller size beverage, according to new Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health research. [More]
New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

An oral biologic medication has successfully treated chronic, precancerous inflammation in the intestine, according to results of an animal study authored by an MD/PhD student in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]