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Fetal microchimerism could be a subtle and dizzyingly complex puzzle

Fetal microchimerism could be a subtle and dizzyingly complex puzzle

Parents go to great lengths to ensure the health and well-being of their developing offspring. The favor, however, may not always be returned. [More]
Researchers examine how small wireless sensors integrated into orthopedic implants can help detect SSI

Researchers examine how small wireless sensors integrated into orthopedic implants can help detect SSI

A team of researchers, led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Professor Eric Ledet, will investigate whether small wireless sensors incorporated into orthopedic implants could be used to detect surgical site infections. The research is supported by a $429,560 grant from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Beta-blockers improve overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer patients

Beta-blockers improve overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer patients

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers demonstrate a benefit in overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients receiving generic heart medications known as beta-blockers. Survival was shown to be greatest among those prescribed first-generation nonselective beta-blockers. [More]
Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes offer hope in healing chronic wounds

Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes offer hope in healing chronic wounds

Dr. Badiavas’ research demonstrates how mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) exosomes, cell-derived vesicles that exist in biological fluids, function to repair non-healing wounds. [More]
VA study examines use of medicinal maggots to heal diabetic foot ulcers

VA study examines use of medicinal maggots to heal diabetic foot ulcers

Maggot, or larval, therapy has been around since ancient times as a way to heal wounds. Now, the method has gone high-tech--in some ways--and it's being tested in a rigorous clinical trial at the Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Gainesville, Fla. Recruitment is now underway. [More]
UMHS tests sound acoustic panels to reduce noise levels in hospital environment

UMHS tests sound acoustic panels to reduce noise levels in hospital environment

One of the most common complaints about hospitals is the noise. Patients complain that they can't sleep soundly in the environment of multiple monitors, paging systems, wheelchairs and gurneys, and carts that squeak. [More]
NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering researcher awarded grant to advance protein hydrogels that mimic nature

NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering researcher awarded grant to advance protein hydrogels that mimic nature

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory's Army Research Office recently awarded a New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering researcher a grant to advance protein-engineered, environmentally responsive hydrogels that could replicate biochemical processes currently found only in nature. These protein hydrogels could become fundamental building blocks of important new biomimetic materials. [More]
SAGE partners with The Katie Piper Foundation to launch journal Scars, Burns & Healing

SAGE partners with The Katie Piper Foundation to launch journal Scars, Burns & Healing

SAGE is delighted to announce a new partnership with The Katie Piper Foundation to launch the unique journal Scars, Burns & Healing. The journal brings together the specialist focus of scar and burns research with the breadth of the science and medicine related to wound healing, and will be accepting its first submissions from summer 2015. [More]
Einstein and Montefiore researchers receive $1.2 million grant to advance spinal cord injury research

Einstein and Montefiore researchers receive $1.2 million grant to advance spinal cord injury research

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System have received a $1.2 million grant from New York State to advance their promising technology for treating paralysis and other effects of spinal cord injuries (SCI). [More]
Allergan receives FDA approval to market 28 additional styles of Natrelle 410 silicone-filled breast implants

Allergan receives FDA approval to market 28 additional styles of Natrelle 410 silicone-filled breast implants

Allergan, plc. today announced that the company has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market 28 additional styles of Natrelle 410 silicone-filled breast implants, giving surgeons and patients more options to achieve desired outcomes. [More]
In vitro testing provides proof of concept for osteopathic manipulative therapy

In vitro testing provides proof of concept for osteopathic manipulative therapy

In vitro studies of the cellular effects of modeled osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMT) provide proof of concept for the manual techniques practiced by doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs), according to researchers from the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix. [More]
Study demonstrates significance of EMT as potential therapeutic target for reversing kidney disease

Study demonstrates significance of EMT as potential therapeutic target for reversing kidney disease

Adults who are worried or terrified sometimes curl up into a fetal position. Likewise, adult cells that are injured, including genetic injury leading to cancer, initiate a process that was present during embryonic development. [More]
Findings shed light on how symmetrical, round cells become polarized and directional

Findings shed light on how symmetrical, round cells become polarized and directional

When Greek mythology and cell biology meet, you get the protein Callipygian, recently discovered and named by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University for its role in determining which area of a cell becomes the back as it begins to move. [More]
Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Intermittent dosing with rapamycin selectively breaks the cascade of inflammatory events that follow cellular senescence, a phenomena in which cells cease to divide in response to DNA damaging agents, including many chemotherapies. [More]
Live imaging study reveals link between wound-associated inflammation and skin cancer risk

Live imaging study reveals link between wound-associated inflammation and skin cancer risk

Researchers in the United Kingdom and Denmark have studied the "see-through" larvae of zebrafish to reveal how wound healing leads to skin cancer. Live imaging shows neutrophils, the protective inflammatory cells of the body's immune system, diverted from an induced wound to any nearby precancerous skin cells. [More]
NIBIB-supported researchers create platelet-like particles to control excessive bleeding, augment clotting

NIBIB-supported researchers create platelet-like particles to control excessive bleeding, augment clotting

NIBIB-supported researchers have created tiny gel particles that can perform the same essential functions as platelets. The particles could one day be used to control excessive bleeding following traumatic injury or in individuals with impaired clotting due to an inherited condition or as a result of certain medications or chemotherapy. [More]
Cell transplantation researchers successfully treat laboratory rats modeled with severe burns

Cell transplantation researchers successfully treat laboratory rats modeled with severe burns

Cell transplantation researchers have successfully used bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to treat a variety of diseases and conditions. Now, using injections of MSCs, a research team in Brazil has successfully treated laboratory rats modeled with severe burns. [More]
The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

Eli Lilly and Company announced that The Lancet Oncology has published results of the Phase III REACH trial that evaluated CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) as a second-line treatment for people with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), also known as liver cancer. While the REACH trial's primary endpoint of overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm, it was not statistically significant. [More]
Study opens new area of discovery for different aspects of cell biology, biomedical research

Study opens new area of discovery for different aspects of cell biology, biomedical research

Every cell in the body uses phosphorylation, the process of adding a chemical tag to control a protein's function and fate, such as when it moves from one part of a cell to another or binds to other proteins. [More]
Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

One of the body's tools for fighting off infection in a wound may actually slow down the healing process, according to new research by a team of Harvard University, Boston Children's Hospital, and Penn State University scientists. [More]
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