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Discovery could lead to new leukaemia therapies

Discovery could lead to new leukaemia therapies

Human blood cells have olfactory receptors that respond to Sandalore. This could provide a starting point for new leukaemia therapies, as researchers from Bochum report in in the journal "Cell Death Discovery". [More]
CellSonic treatments reduce problems of muscles recovering after exertion

CellSonic treatments reduce problems of muscles recovering after exertion

Since non-invasive shockwaves were used forty years ago to remove kidney stones and became standard procedure in all hospitals worldwide for having no side effects, they have been used in many other applications. [More]
Newcastle University scientists use seaweed extract to develop 'Stem-gell' bandage for wound healing

Newcastle University scientists use seaweed extract to develop 'Stem-gell' bandage for wound healing

Publishing in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine Professor Che Connon and Dr Stephen Swioklo describe the low-cost seaweed solution. [More]
Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Previous research studies have linked obesity to adverse outcomes and increased costs following total knee replacement surgery (TKR). A new, computer model-based evaluation appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, supports bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis (loss of cartilage and joint pain, caused by aging and use) prior to TKR. [More]
Fibrosis in kidney transplants driven by continuous injury

Fibrosis in kidney transplants driven by continuous injury

Clinically, kidney fibrosis can be used to assess stage, progression, and prognosis for both kidney transplants and kidney disease. There is debate as to whether kidney fibrosis is a maladaptive, injury-triggered process that inherently progresses to kidney failure or an adaptive wound-healing process that stabilizes the injury site. [More]
WASF3 protein appears to be solid target for reducing cancer metastasis

WASF3 protein appears to be solid target for reducing cancer metastasis

A protein that is constantly expressed by cancer cells and quiescent in healthy ones appears to be a solid target for reducing cancer's ability to spread, scientists report. [More]
Breast cancer patients only moderately informed about pros and cons of breast reconstructive surgery

Breast cancer patients only moderately informed about pros and cons of breast reconstructive surgery

A study by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and collaborators has uncovered a need to better inform breast cancer patients about the pros and cons of breast reconstructive surgery among women undergoing mastectomy. [More]
Drexel biomedical engineer identifies immune cell as potential strategy for growing blood vessels

Drexel biomedical engineer identifies immune cell as potential strategy for growing blood vessels

In what could be a pivotal step toward repairing non-healing wounds and damaged organs, a Drexel University biomedical engineer has identified an immune cell as a potential strategy for growing blood vessels. [More]
Araim Pharmaceuticals forms new strategic collaboration with Vault Bioventures to market novel peptides

Araim Pharmaceuticals forms new strategic collaboration with Vault Bioventures to market novel peptides

Araim Pharmaceuticals has formed a long-term strategic partnership with Vault Bioventures to facilitate the advancement to market of its novel peptide library which targets devastating injuries and chronic diseases underserved by current therapies. [More]
SDSU researchers explore ways to eradicate thirdhand smoke

SDSU researchers explore ways to eradicate thirdhand smoke

When cigarette smoke is blown into the environment, its chemical constituents don't just vanish into thin air. Residue from the smoke settles into, accumulates and is stored in the surrounding environment, such as upholstery, carpets, walls, clothing and curtains. [More]
Body can control pathogen-induced inflammatory response, find Georgia State researchers

Body can control pathogen-induced inflammatory response, find Georgia State researchers

The body can control inflammatory response triggered by invasions of microbial pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses, a discovery that could lead to the development of new therapeutic agents for uncontrolled inflammation, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Researchers identify new gene that helps maintain chromosome number in cells

Researchers identify new gene that helps maintain chromosome number in cells

Molecular biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a gene called NORAD that helps maintain the proper number of chromosomes in cells, and that when inactivated, causes the number of chromosomes in a cell to become unstable, a key feature of cancer cells. [More]
Vitamin D plays substantial role in patient outcomes after weight-loss surgery

Vitamin D plays substantial role in patient outcomes after weight-loss surgery

Low levels of vitamin D have long been identified as an unwanted hallmark of weight loss surgery, but now findings of a new Johns Hopkins study of more than 930,000 patient records add to evidence that seasonal sun exposure -- a key factor in the body's natural ability to make the "sunshine vitamin" -- plays a substantial role in how well people do after such operations. [More]
Australian researchers develop new technique to combat chronic bacterial infections in hospitals

Australian researchers develop new technique to combat chronic bacterial infections in hospitals

One of the scourges of infections in hospitals – biofilms formed by bacteria that stick to each other on living tissue and medical instruments, making them harder to remove – can be tricked into dispersing with the targeted application of nanoparticles and heat, researchers have found. [More]
Synthetic biomaterial aids in regeneration of skin cells to improve wound healing

Synthetic biomaterial aids in regeneration of skin cells to improve wound healing

Some skin wounds, such as diabetic ulcers, are chronic and may never heal; others, such as burn wounds, are often large and difficult to treat, resulting in pain, infection and scarring. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, funded by the National Institutes of Health, have developed a synthetic biomaterial that fills wounds and aids in regeneration of skin cells, which ultimately improves wound healing. [More]
Patient's mental health prior to radical cystectomy can influence postoperative outcomes

Patient's mental health prior to radical cystectomy can influence postoperative outcomes

A patient's mental health prior to surgery can influence postoperative outcomes. Removal of the bladder, or radical cystectomy (RC), is an effective treatment for locally advanced bladder cancer, but complications occur in as many as 66% of patients. [More]
Soap and water less effective than saline water for cleaning wounds

Soap and water less effective than saline water for cleaning wounds

Many scientific advances have been made in the delivery of care and infection prevention for open fractures, but the standard practice of wound cleaning with soap and water before surgery has remained unchanged. [More]
Notre Dame researchers discover compound that speeds up diabetic wound healing

Notre Dame researchers discover compound that speeds up diabetic wound healing

Non-healing chronic wounds are a major complication of diabetes, which result in more than 70,000 lower-limb amputations in the United States alone each year. The reasons why diabetic wounds are resistant to healing are not fully understood, and there are limited therapeutic agents that could accelerate or facilitate their repair. [More]
Certain platelet-derived growth factors can encourage regeneration of liver tissue following surgery

Certain platelet-derived growth factors can encourage regeneration of liver tissue following surgery

A team of researchers at the MedUni Vienna has discovered that certain platelet-derived growth factors are of major significance for the liver's regeneration processes. It has been shown that platelets can encourage the regrowth of liver tissue in patients who have had parts of their liver removed surgically. [More]
Research collaboration aims to develop new drug for slow-healing chronic wounds

Research collaboration aims to develop new drug for slow-healing chronic wounds

The biotech company Omnio based in Swedish Umeå, and led by researcher Tor Ny at Umeå University, launches a research collaboration with the Canadian pharmaceutical company ProMetic to develop a new drug for slow-healing chronic wounds. The collaboration includes funding for clinical studies of a drug based on the blood plasma protein plasminogen. [More]
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