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Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

In the first study of its kind, Rice University researchers have mapped how information flows through the genetic circuits that cause cancer cells to become metastatic. The research reveals a common pattern in the decision-making that allows cancer cells to both migrate and form new tumors. Researchers say the commonality may open the door to new drugs that interfere with the genetic switches that cancer must flip to form both cancer stem cells and circulating tumor cells -- two of the main players in cancer metastasis. [More]
Ludwig researchers discover key mechanism that control plasticity of epithelial cells

Ludwig researchers discover key mechanism that control plasticity of epithelial cells

Ludwig Oxford researchers have discovered a key mechanism that governs how cells of the epithelia, the soft lining of inner body cavities, shift between a rigid, highly structured and immobile state and a flexible and motile form. [More]
MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma. Through a series of sophisticated experiments, researchers reporting in The American Journal of Pathology suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays a pivotal role in disruption of the brain/spinal cord barrier (BSCB), cell death, and functional deficits after SCI. [More]
Findings show that blockade of OGF-OGFr interfacing influences diabetic wound healing

Findings show that blockade of OGF-OGFr interfacing influences diabetic wound healing

A major complication associated with diabetes is delayed cell replication in epithelium and skin. Researchers at The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania have reported the presence and function of the opioid growth factor (OGF) and its nuclear-associated receptor (OGFr) in skin. [More]
Major weight loss: A risk factor for wound complications in body contouring surgery

Major weight loss: A risk factor for wound complications in body contouring surgery

Patients who lost more than 100 pounds and those who shed weight through bariatric surgery had the highest risk of complications from later surgical procedures to reshape their leaner bodies, a new study from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows. [More]
Caltech researcher explores link between variable heart rate, health and fitness

Caltech researcher explores link between variable heart rate, health and fitness

Although the heart beats out a very familiar "lub-dub" pattern that speeds up or slows down as our activity increases or decreases, the pattern itself isn't as regular as you might think. In fact, the amount of time between heartbeats can vary even at a "constant" heart rate-and that variability, doctors have found, is a good thing. [More]
Ramucirumab Phase III study meets primary endpoint in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Ramucirumab Phase III study meets primary endpoint in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Eli Lilly and Company today announced that the RAISE trial, a Phase III study of ramucirumab (CYRAMZA) in combination with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), met its primary endpoint of overall survival. [More]

Facial rejuvenation to address multiple signs of aging face can be performed safely at 1 time

A total facial rejuvenation that combines three procedures to address the multiple signs of an aging face and neck can be performed safely at one time, a new study shows. [More]
UT Southwestern Medical Center's multi-disciplinary wound care efforts

UT Southwestern Medical Center's multi-disciplinary wound care efforts

UT Southwestern Medical Center's multi-disciplinary wound care efforts have converged in a new, state-of-the-art clinic. [More]
FGF proteins play broad roles in wound healing

FGF proteins play broad roles in wound healing

Mice missing two important proteins of the vascular system develop normally and appear healthy in adulthood, as long as they don't become injured. If they do, their wounds don't heal properly, a new study shows. [More]
MGH-developed microfluidic device may help study key steps involved in development of tumor metastasis

MGH-developed microfluidic device may help study key steps involved in development of tumor metastasis

A microfluidic device developed at Massachusetts General Hospital may help study key steps in the process by which cancer cells break off from a primary tumor to invade other tissues and form metastases. [More]

AAWC partners with EWMA and AWMA to develop unprecedented guidance document

The Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) is pleased to have partnered with the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) and the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) to develop an unprecedented guidance document entitled, "Managing Wounds as a Team." [More]
UCSF study: Acute psychological stress promotes healing in mouse models of different skin irritations

UCSF study: Acute psychological stress promotes healing in mouse models of different skin irritations

Brief, acute psychological stress promoted healing in mouse models of three different types of skin irritations, in a study led by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Statin therapy may speed up wound healing following cardiac surgery

Statin therapy may speed up wound healing following cardiac surgery

Statin therapy may help to improve wound healing in patients following cardiac surgery and reduce overall recovery time, especially in patients who are prone to healing complications, according to a review article in the August 2014 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Researchers discover new function of body's most important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers discover new function of body's most important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered a new function of the body's most important tumor-suppressing protein. Called p53, this protein has been called "the guardian of the genome." [More]
Researchers working to develop new drugs for treating chronic inflammatory diseases

Researchers working to develop new drugs for treating chronic inflammatory diseases

Science and industry are collaborating to develop future pharmaceuticals for treating chronic inflammatory diseases. The medicines will combat immunological processes that have gone wrong. [More]
Short movie shows development of dressing promotes wound healing

Short movie shows development of dressing promotes wound healing

Someone suffers second- or third-degree burns: The wound must immediately be dressed and the dressing is to be changed regularly. A short movie made by the group of Prof. Dr.-Ing. Stephan Barcikowski shows the development of a dressing that promotes wound healing - from the materials research laboratory until the first practical trial (in English). [More]
Targeting CXCR4–CXCL12–CXCR7 axis combats mTOR inhibitor resistance in renal cancer

Targeting CXCR4–CXCL12–CXCR7 axis combats mTOR inhibitor resistance in renal cancer

There is considerable crosstalk between the CXCR4–CXCL12–CXCR7 axis and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in human renal cell carcinoma, and targeting the axis may overcome drug resistance to mTOR inhibitors, researchers suggest. [More]
Study: People with mobility impairments under age 65 have higher rates of smoking

Study: People with mobility impairments under age 65 have higher rates of smoking

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that people with mobility impairments under age 65 have significantly higher rates of smoking than those without mobility impairments. [More]
Mice fed with omega 3 fatty acids have healthier joints

Mice fed with omega 3 fatty acids have healthier joints

Mice consuming a supplement of omega 3 fatty acids had healthier joints than those fed diets high in saturated fats and omega 6 fatty acids, according to Duke Medicine researchers. [More]