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Physicians come together for single-payer national health insurance reform

Physicians come together for single-payer national health insurance reform

In a dramatic show of physician support for deeper health reform - and for making a decisive break with the private insurance model of financing medical care - 2,231 physicians called today [Thursday, May 5] for the creation of a publicly financed, single-payer national health program that would cover all Americans for all medically necessary care. [More]
New smartphone app can effectively track palpitations in heart patients

New smartphone app can effectively track palpitations in heart patients

A smartphone app that tracks palpitations in heart patients provides comparable performance to the 14-day event monitors that are the current standard of care, according to a University at Buffalo study presented May 4th at the annual Heart Rhythm Society meeting in San Francisco. [More]
Study identifies sex differences in statin therapy among coronary artery disease patients

Study identifies sex differences in statin therapy among coronary artery disease patients

Statins are equally effective at decreasing risk of coronary events in men and women, and yet women are less likely to be prescribed these cholesterol-lowering drugs than men. [More]
Guide to advance directives: an interview with Dr Lisa Price

Guide to advance directives: an interview with Dr Lisa Price

An advance directive is a very specific legal document that details the medical treatments you want, and, importantly, don’t want, if you’re unable to communicate with a physician. This may happen as a result of a critical illness that could make you confused or unable to speak. [More]
Patient-oriented online health resources can impact clinical outcomes of pancreatic cancer patients

Patient-oriented online health resources can impact clinical outcomes of pancreatic cancer patients

The Internet has become a powerful and important resource for daily life. When patients receive a medical diagnosis, particularly a difficult one like pancreatic cancer, the web can be an essential information tool, helping to enable patients to have meaningful discussions with health care providers. However, new research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center published today in JAMA Surgery suggests that online information about pancreatic cancer is often written at a prohibitively high reading level and lacks accuracy concerning alternative therapies. [More]
Climate change may be key factor for increasing rates of chronic kidney disease

Climate change may be key factor for increasing rates of chronic kidney disease

Climate change may be accelerating rates of chronic kidney disease caused by dehydration and heat stress, according to research appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Researchers link global increase in type 1 diabetes to advances in medical care

Researchers link global increase in type 1 diabetes to advances in medical care

Researchers from the University of Adelaide say the global increase in cases of type 1 diabetes is directly linked to advances in medical care, with the underlying genetics of the disease more likely to be passed from one generation to the next. [More]
Common misconception about penicillin allergies

Common misconception about penicillin allergies

It's time for your primary care check-up, and the doctor asks you to list any known drug allergies. "Penicillin," you say immediately, although you can't remember actually taking the drug or having a reaction to it—it was your parents who said so. According to a Texas A&M Health Science Center allergist, many people who believe they're allergic to this antibiotic may not actually be allergic at all. [More]
Use of cosmetics during pregnancy can have adverse effects on newborn’s health

Use of cosmetics during pregnancy can have adverse effects on newborn’s health

A study led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center's School of Public Health presents evidence linking personal care products used during pregnancy to adverse reproductive effects in newborns. [More]
Formal mental health therapies offer little relief from postpartum depression for low-income mothers of color

Formal mental health therapies offer little relief from postpartum depression for low-income mothers of color

Health care providers and human service agencies often manage postpartum depression with formal mental health treatments and antidepressant therapies, but for new, low-income mothers of color these interventions often provide little relief from the mood disorder that sometimes follows childbirth, according to a new study led by a University at Buffalo researcher. [More]
Older adults experience greater survival rates after lung cancer surgery

Older adults experience greater survival rates after lung cancer surgery

Patients aged 65 years and older are living longer after lung cancer surgery, and with older people representing a rapidly growing proportion of patients diagnosed with lung cancer, this improved survival is especially significant, according to an article posted online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Study emphasizes benefits of newborn screening for CF patients

Study emphasizes benefits of newborn screening for CF patients

A new study led by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and Cystic Fibrosis Canada reinforces the benefits of newborn screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. [More]
LifeBridge Health study to explore potential benefits of wireless heart monitoring system

LifeBridge Health study to explore potential benefits of wireless heart monitoring system

The LifeBridge Health Cardiovascular Institute has launched a pilot study to evaluate the potential benefits of a wireless heart monitoring system for patients with moderate to severe heart failure. The system tracks weight, blood pressure and other measures, and automatically sends the information to doctors and staff at the Cardiovascular Institute. The study is looking at whether this approach, designed to be simple and easy-to-use, can result in better outcomes for patients with heart failure. [More]
Proton therapy offers new hope to patients with inoperable tumors

Proton therapy offers new hope to patients with inoperable tumors

An enormous high tech machine is providing new hope to patients across the country with inoperable tumors. Proton therapy is a precise radiation technique that reduces the side effects often accompanied by traditional treatment options. Thanks to this remarkable technology, a new proton therapy center at UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health is saving the eyesight of a new mother who was diagnosed with a tumor behind her eye during her second trimester of pregnancy. [More]
Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
University hospital in Finland invests in digital pathology from Sectra

University hospital in Finland invests in digital pathology from Sectra

Kuopio University Hospital will be Finland's first fully digital pathology department following its investment in Sectra's IT solution for efficient storage, review and sharing of digital pathology images. The Diagnostic Imaging Center at Kuopio University Hospital is thereby extending its existing solution for handling radiology images (PACS) to also include pathology images. This enables in-depth cooperation between the hospital's radiologists and pathologists; two of the key functions in effective clinical care. [More]
New 3D-printed talus replacement surgery to treat avascular necrosis provides life-changing experience

New 3D-printed talus replacement surgery to treat avascular necrosis provides life-changing experience

The talus is the part ankle that allows the foot to move in all different directions. High impact injuries like falls, or traffic accidents can cause the talus bone to be fractured, and a high percentage of these injuries result in avascular necrosis (AVN)—the death of the bone. In a first-of-its-kind procedure using 3D printing technology, internationally renowned orthopedic surgeon Dr. Mark Myerson, Director, The Institute for Foot and Ankle Reconstruction at Mercy Medical Center, explains how a talus replacement, tailored to the patient's specific dimensions, can result in a "life-changing experience" for the patient. [More]
Unfolding story of Zika virus in the Americas

Unfolding story of Zika virus in the Americas

Health Systems & Reform presents the article "Zika Virus and Health Systems in Brazil: From Unknown to a Menace," a commentary by Professor Marcia C. Castro, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, on the Zika Virus epidemic in Brazil and the Americas. [More]
Study estimates 30% of outpatient oral antibiotic prescription in the U.S as inappropriate

Study estimates 30% of outpatient oral antibiotic prescription in the U.S as inappropriate

An estimated 30 percent of outpatient oral antibiotic prescriptions in the U.S. in 2010-2011 may have been inappropriate, findings that support the need for establishing a goal for outpatient antibiotic stewardship, according to a study appearing in the May 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
LALES study analyzes risk, prevalence of early and late stage AMD among Latinos

LALES study analyzes risk, prevalence of early and late stage AMD among Latinos

The University of Southern California Roski Eye Institute researchers and clinicians published results of the largest population-based study of adult Latinos and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the National Eye Institute-funded "Los Angeles Latino Eye Study." The study, published in JAMA Ophthalmology, is the first to analyze the risk and prevalence of early and late stage AMD and its impact on quality of life for older Latinos. [More]
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