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Federal judge's ruling blocks shutdown of Texas abortion clinics

Federal judge's ruling blocks shutdown of Texas abortion clinics

Another ruling in Louisiana also puts on hold a restrictive law in that state -- one that would require abortion providers have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. [More]
Battle between cholera bacteria and bacteria-killing viruses

Battle between cholera bacteria and bacteria-killing viruses

In the battle between our immune systems and cholera bacteria, humans may have an unknown ally in bacteria-killing viruses known as phages. [More]

More big firms shifting to high-deductible health plans

The New York Times examines the movement among large employers towards high-deductible plans that shift more health care costs to workers. Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal looks at how the ACA may affect job-based plans next year. [More]
Soligenix announces promising preliminary results from study on ricin toxin vaccine

Soligenix announces promising preliminary results from study on ricin toxin vaccine

Soligenix, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing products to treat serious inflammatory diseases where there remains an unmet medical need, as well as developing several biodefense vaccines and therapeutics, announced today promising preliminary results from a preclinical study with its ricin toxin vaccine RiVax™, in a non-human primate (NHP) lethal aerosol exposure model. [More]
Researchers find way to take pediatric patient's skin cells

Researchers find way to take pediatric patient's skin cells

Researchers have found a way to take a pediatric patient's skin cells, reprogram the skin cells to function as heart valvular cells, and then use the cells as part of a tissue-engineered pulmonary valve. A proof of concept study in the September 2014 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery provides more detail on this scientific development. [More]

CRHC launches new fully-featured website coruralhealth.org

The Colorado Rural Health Center (CRHC) – Colorado's nonprofit State Office of Rural Health and member-based association - today announced the launch of its new fully-featured website coruralhealth.org. [More]
Permanent atrial fibrillation twins risk of stroke than paroxysmal AF

Permanent atrial fibrillation twins risk of stroke than paroxysmal AF

Permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) doubles the risk of stroke compared to paroxysmal AF, according to research in more than 6 000 patients presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Thomas Vanassche from Belgium. The findings suggest that a simple clinical assessment of the type of AF can help doctors to better estimate stroke risk. [More]
Research: 7 key issues need to be addressed to ensure future success of doctor revalidation

Research: 7 key issues need to be addressed to ensure future success of doctor revalidation

New research launched today, 1st September 2014, has concluded that there are seven key issues that need to be addressed to ensure the future success of doctor revalidation, the most profound revision in medical regulation since the Medical Act of 1858. [More]
Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Over the past several decades, malaria diagnosis has changed very little. After taking a blood sample from a patient, a technician smears the blood across a glass slide, stains it with a special dye, and looks under a microscope for the Plasmodium parasite, which causes the disease. [More]
Novel document on ventricular arrhythmias published in EP Europace

Novel document on ventricular arrhythmias published in EP Europace

The first expert consensus on ventricular arrhythmias is published today. The novel document compiles current evidence on the diagnosis and management of ventricular arrhythmias and was agreed by international experts from three continents. [More]
Commercial health care spending up from higher medical service costs

Commercial health care spending up from higher medical service costs

Recent growth in health care spending for commercially insured individuals is due primarily to increases in prices for medical services, rather than increased use, according to a new study led by researchers at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, published in the August issue of the American Journal of Managed Care. [More]
Viewpoints: GOP's 2015 Obamacare opportunities; the need for community health workers; WHO's Ebola response

Viewpoints: GOP's 2015 Obamacare opportunities; the need for community health workers; WHO's Ebola response

In another sign that the politics of Obamacare continue to shift, the Medicaid expansion is now all but certain to come to another big state whose Republican governor had previously resisted it: Pennsylvania. ... The details of the final deal will matter. But broadly speaking this looks like another sign of just how hard it is for Republican governors in non-deep-red states to resist the expansion -; and of how the politics of this issue continue to change (Greg Sargent, 8/28). [More]
State highlights: States seek health care autonomy; L.A. nursing home audit; promoting overdose-reversal drug

State highlights: States seek health care autonomy; L.A. nursing home audit; promoting overdose-reversal drug

Kansas, Missouri and seven other states have signed on to a movement that would wrest regulation of most of the nation's health care insurance systems from the federal government. [More]

Pennsylvania's Corbett becomes 9th GOP governor to expand Medicaid

Gov. Tom Corbett reached a deal with the Obama administration to use federal funds to put about 500,000 low-income residents into managed care plans already used by the state. There were conflicting reports about the details of the federal waiver, but Corbett's original plan to include work incentives was not approved. [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Surgical treatment of hip fractures can achieve better survival and functional outcomes than nonoperative treatment, but less is known about its economic benefits. ... We estimated the effects of surgical treatment for displaced hip fractures through a Markov cohort analysis of patients 65 years and older. ... Estimated average lifetime societal benefits per patient exceeded the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 for displaced hip fractures. With the exception of the assumption of nursing home use, the sensitivity analyses show that surgery produces positive net societal savings (Gu, Koenig, Mather and Tongue, 8/5). [More]

CBO chief says Obamacare is reducing deficit

News outlets also look at a looming court decision on the health law's subsidies and the potential impact of big data on health outcomes. [More]
Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen Research & Development, LLC and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, announced today the expansion of the EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to include additional high-risk patient populations. [More]
Mary Baxter outlines five key ways pharmacy leaders can help hospitals fulfill quality care mission

Mary Baxter outlines five key ways pharmacy leaders can help hospitals fulfill quality care mission

In part four of a blog series that addresses how to leverage a hospital pharmacy as a strategic asset, Mary Baxter, MBA, RPh., vice president and national practice leader for Cardinal Health's Innovation Delivery Solutions business, discusses how expanding patient access to quality pharmacy care can benefit both hospitals and patients. [More]

Washington state exchange confronts persistent technical problems

Officials for the state's online health marketplace also ask lawmakers to increase the cap on general fund money they can use for marketing. [More]
Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Young athletes today often participate in sports year round and with increasingly competitive club and school sports, it has become common to choose one sport to specialize at a young age. While this specialization may seem like a competitive edge, new Northwestern Medicine research suggests that repetitive activity in just one sport, high impact or not, may not be a great idea for growing athletes. [More]