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Higher intake of food-based vitamin D during pregnancy linked to reduced risk of allergies in children

Higher intake of food-based vitamin D during pregnancy linked to reduced risk of allergies in children

Higher intake of foods containing vitamin D during pregnancy - but not supplemental vitamin D intake - was associated with reduced risk of development of allergies in children, according to a study led by an investigator from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
GEMS project to explore events leading to MS in at-risk individuals

GEMS project to explore events leading to MS in at-risk individuals

A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has launched a study of individuals at risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). By focusing on first-degree family members of MS patients, the research team seeks to better understand the sequence of events that leads some people to develop the disease. [More]
Study looks at post-treatment resources for prostate cancer patients transitioning to survivorship

Study looks at post-treatment resources for prostate cancer patients transitioning to survivorship

The System Partner of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Meridian Health is joining forces with Rutgers Cancer Institute in offering access to a research study aimed at prostate cancer patients who are transitioning to survivorship. [More]
Enhancing quality of life for people with serious illnesses

Enhancing quality of life for people with serious illnesses

Being diagnosed with a potentially life-threatening illness is distressing enough but a dearth of cohesive services often compounds the difficulty, according to an NAU researcher. [More]
Saint Louis University research finds that China's smoking rates may start to decline

Saint Louis University research finds that China's smoking rates may start to decline

Younger Chinese teenage boys are less likely to start smoking than those born longer ago, according to research from Saint Louis University and Chongqing University. [More]
Study finds significant variation in dementia incidence among ethnic and racial groups

Study finds significant variation in dementia incidence among ethnic and racial groups

In the largest and longest study thus far of ethnic disparities in dementia risk, researchers compared six ethnic and racial groups within the same geographic population and found significant variation in dementia incidence among them. [More]
Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Previous research has established a link between genetic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to an increased risk of developing ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer in women. [More]
UPMC uses simple gene test to personalize medications for patients undergoing heart catheterization

UPMC uses simple gene test to personalize medications for patients undergoing heart catheterization

Patients who go to UPMC Presbyterian for heart catheterization and who receive a stent to treat clogged arteries are now being screened with a simple blood test to determine if they have a gene variant that makes them less likely to respond to a blood-thinning medication commonly prescribed after the procedure. [More]

Health Monitor Network, ProHEALTH partner to enhance healthcare experience of patients

Health Monitor Network, the leading patient-engagement company, and ProHEALTH Care Associates, LLP, one of the largest integrated physician group practices in the New York metropolitan area, have announced an exclusive partnership designed to enhance the healthcare experience of ProHEALTH's approximately 800,000 patients, both in physician offices and at home. [More]
UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, UMMS President and CEO Robert Chrencik named recipients of 'Speaker's Medallion'

UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, UMMS President and CEO Robert Chrencik named recipients of 'Speaker's Medallion'

The Maryland House of Delegates and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, has announced that University of Maryland School of Medicine Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA and University of Maryland Medical System President and CEO Robert Chrencik, MBA, are recipients of the "Speaker's Medallion," the highest honor given to the public by the leader of the Maryland House of Delegates. [More]
Dementia incidence highest in African Americans, lowest in Asian Americans

Dementia incidence highest in African Americans, lowest in Asian Americans

The first study to look at dementia risk in a population representing the diversity of the United States finds dementia incidence to be highest in African Americans and lowest in Asian Americans. The rate of occurrence of dementia in African Americans was found to be 65 percent higher than Asian Americans. [More]
Simulated practice in healthcare: an interview with Andy Anderson

Simulated practice in healthcare: an interview with Andy Anderson

There's around 95 to 100 simulation centres across the NHS in secondary care. These centres are used for a whole variety of training, practicing of skills and recreating incidents so that staff can prevent them recurring. [More]
Covestro to showcase high-performance materials for medical applications at MD&M West 2016

Covestro to showcase high-performance materials for medical applications at MD&M West 2016

With people living longer and leading more-active lives, demands placed on medical equipment have grown. The medical wearable electronics market has evolved to provide patients with a more comfortable experience, while enabling them to be mobile and limit time spent in the hospital for treatment and maintenance. [More]
Temple team describes use of cadaver DNA to advance genetics learning in medical curriculum

Temple team describes use of cadaver DNA to advance genetics learning in medical curriculum

Cadavers have long been one of the most important resources for anatomy teaching in medical school. Now, they are also at the forefront of cutting-edge genetics teaching, thanks to innovative thinking by professors at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. [More]
Low-income families having children with special health care needs at high risk for food insecurity

Low-income families having children with special health care needs at high risk for food insecurity

Low-income families with children who have special health care needs are at high risk for food insecurity, even when they receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and participate in public assistance programs, such as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers discover new bacterial species that triggers Lyme disease in people

Mayo Clinic researchers discover new bacterial species that triggers Lyme disease in people

Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi. [More]
Alternatives exist to eliminate nonmedical exemptions for childhood vaccination

Alternatives exist to eliminate nonmedical exemptions for childhood vaccination

For more than 30 years, Mississippi and West Virginia were the only states in the country that disallowed nonmedical exemptions to mandatory school vaccination laws for religious or philosophical reasons, until they were joined by California last year. These exemption laws have provoked debate over the rights of parents versus the responsibility of government to protect public health. [More]
Elsevier releases new book on India's health care reforms

Elsevier releases new book on India's health care reforms

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, recently announced the launch of Health Care Reforms in India: Making Up for the Lost Decade, an authoritative and incisive look at India's healthcare system from the perspective of Rajendra Pratap Gupta, an expert healthcare observer as well as an influential and respected voice on public policy, innovation and the economy. [More]
Cold viruses at school largely to blame for asthma hospitalizations

Cold viruses at school largely to blame for asthma hospitalizations

The most dangerous times of year for children with asthma are soon after their schools reopen after a break, and a new study finds that cold viruses are largely to blame. [More]

New reports discuss future demands facing VA health services

Three reports that discuss the future demands facing the VA Health Care System, the current resources in the system and how care is provided to veterans outside the federal system have been released by the RAND Corporation. [More]
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