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Longer Looks: HIV epidemic in the Deep South; planning for Alzheimer's; Obamacare conspiracy theory

Longer Looks: HIV epidemic in the Deep South; planning for Alzheimer's; Obamacare conspiracy theory

One of the strangest things about the H.I.V. epidemic in the Deep South-;from Louisiana to Alabama to Mississippi-;is how easily most Americans have elided it, choosing instead to imagine that the disease is now an out-there, elsewhere epidemic. [More]

ARCA biopharma announces genetic screening of first patient in GENETIC-AF Phase 2B/3 clinical trial

ARCA biopharma, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing genetically targeted therapies for cardiovascular diseases, today announced that the first patient has been genetically screened in GENETIC-AF, its Phase 2B/3 adaptive design clinical trial. [More]

April 21-27 officially proclaimed as Ann Arbor Veg Week

VegMichigan has teamed up with US VegWeek to bring you Ann Arbor Veg Week 2014, a week-long celebration of meat-free living. [More]
Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]

Research provides fresh insight into structure of sodium channels

Sodium channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as heart disease, epilepsy and pain, making them an important potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still much scientists do not know about the molecules. [More]
Study proposes new model for understanding how proteins bind together to facilitate cell movement

Study proposes new model for understanding how proteins bind together to facilitate cell movement

Cell movement plays an important role in a host of biological functions from embryonic development to repairing wounded tissue. It also enables cancer cells to break free from their sites of origin and migrate throughout the body. [More]
Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

A study of predominantly white women finds a larger waist circumference is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but not beyond its contribution to BMI. The study, by American Cancer Society researchers, fails to confirm previous findings that body shape itself is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. The current study appears in the April 2014 issue of Cancer Causes, and Control. [More]

NICE recommends FIRMAGON for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer in adults with spinal metastases

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) today issued its Final Appraisal Determination (FAD) recommending FIRMAGON (degarelix) as an option for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer, only in adults with spinal metastases who present with signs or symptoms of spinal cord compression. [More]
Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

With growing evidence that a measurement of the buildup of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) researchers found that the process of "calcium scoring" was also accurate in predicting the chances of dying of heart disease among adults with little or no known risk of heart disease. [More]

Hospital sees success by temporarily connecting major blood vessels

Doctors at Henry Ford Hospital reached a medical milestone April 3, performing the 25th successful transcatheter valve replacement using a novel way to access the heart. [More]

Researchers reveal why Peel has one of highest rates of diabetes in Ontario

According to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital, there are two significant reasons why Peel has one of the highest rates of diabetes in Ontario: neighbourhood design that discourages walking and a population with many residents whose ethnic backgrounds predispose them to diabetes. [More]
RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

Treatment options for high-risk heart patients with severely calcified coronary artery disease (CAD) have been limited for more than 20 years. Now, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital offers a new alternative to open up blocked arteries. [More]
Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola University Medical Center is now offering patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner on the market. The state-of-the-art system is improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions. [More]
Abbott completes enrollment of 3 clinical trials to support approval of Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold

Abbott completes enrollment of 3 clinical trials to support approval of Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) today announced it has completed enrollment of three clinical trials to support approvals of the company's revolutionary Absorbâ„¢ Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (BVS) in the United States, Japan and China. [More]

Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

Research shows that rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]
New policies needed to address the growing demands of Alzheimer's disease

New policies needed to address the growing demands of Alzheimer's disease

To address the burgeoning demands of Alzheimer's disease that will affect generations, new policies will have to be adopted to acknowledge the complex and unique needs of people with dementia. [More]
Depression linked to poor self-management in patients with diabetes

Depression linked to poor self-management in patients with diabetes

Adult patients with diabetes who trust their medical provider and feel included in treatment decisions are significantly more likely to take and maintain a newly prescribed antidepressant medication, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
Study finds upward trend in more severe forms of obesity in children

Study finds upward trend in more severe forms of obesity in children

A new study led by a University of North Carolina School of Medicine researcher finds little to cheer about in the fight against childhood obesity, despite a recent report to the contrary. [More]