Heart Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Disease News and Research

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]
Bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes, say researchers

Bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes, say researchers

Bariatric surgery has positive effects not only on weight loss but also on diabetes and heart disease. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy and University of Cincinnati have shown that the health benefits are not caused by a reduction in the stomach size but by increased levels of bile acids in the blood. [More]
Men's health conditions may be influenced by exposure to testosterone in womb, says study

Men's health conditions may be influenced by exposure to testosterone in womb, says study

Men's susceptibility to serious health conditions may be influenced by low exposure to testosterone in the womb, new research suggests. [More]
Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

While 94 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would participate in public health programs that screen newborns for a specific number of genetic conditions, only 80 per cent said they would be willing to participate in screening that would sequence their newborns' genomes. [More]

States have limited time for decision on setting up marketplaces

Meanwhile, other outlets look at the deadline enrollment surge and its possible effect on health care costs. [More]
Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Nonsteroidal antinflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) that block an enzyme called COX-2 relieve pain and inflammation but can cause heart attacks, stroke, heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death. [More]

Jersey Shore opens new CVICU to provide post-operative care for cardiac surgery patients

Jersey Shore University Medical Center recently unveiled the new CardioVascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) - a twelve bed critical care unit providing post-operative care for cardiac surgery patients, including those who receive traditional open heart surgery and newer, complex interventional cardiovascular procedures. [More]
First Edition: April 21, 2014

First Edition: April 21, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including a GAO report on how the Obama administration raised money from outside groups to promote the health law. [More]
Benzodiazepines may contribute to respiratory problems in people with COPD

Benzodiazepines may contribute to respiratory problems in people with COPD

A group of drugs commonly prescribed for insomnia, anxiety and breathing issues "significantly increase the risk" that older people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, need to visit a doctor or Emergency Department for respiratory reasons, new research has found. [More]
Researchers receive $3.7M NIH grant to develop anti-smoking program for HIV-infected smoker

Researchers receive $3.7M NIH grant to develop anti-smoking program for HIV-infected smoker

Montefiore Medical Center researchers have received a $3.7 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop an anti-smoking program for HIV-infected smokers. [More]
Longer Looks: HIV epidemic in the Deep South; planning for Alzheimer's; Obamacare conspiracy theory

Longer Looks: HIV epidemic in the Deep South; planning for Alzheimer's; Obamacare conspiracy theory

One of the strangest things about the H.I.V. epidemic in the Deep South-;from Louisiana to Alabama to Mississippi-;is how easily most Americans have elided it, choosing instead to imagine that the disease is now an out-there, elsewhere epidemic. [More]

ARCA biopharma announces genetic screening of first patient in GENETIC-AF Phase 2B/3 clinical trial

ARCA biopharma, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing genetically targeted therapies for cardiovascular diseases, today announced that the first patient has been genetically screened in GENETIC-AF, its Phase 2B/3 adaptive design clinical trial. [More]

April 21-27 officially proclaimed as Ann Arbor Veg Week

VegMichigan has teamed up with US VegWeek to bring you Ann Arbor Veg Week 2014, a week-long celebration of meat-free living. [More]
Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]

Research provides fresh insight into structure of sodium channels

Sodium channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as heart disease, epilepsy and pain, making them an important potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still much scientists do not know about the molecules. [More]
Study proposes new model for understanding how proteins bind together to facilitate cell movement

Study proposes new model for understanding how proteins bind together to facilitate cell movement

Cell movement plays an important role in a host of biological functions from embryonic development to repairing wounded tissue. It also enables cancer cells to break free from their sites of origin and migrate throughout the body. [More]
Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

A study of predominantly white women finds a larger waist circumference is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but not beyond its contribution to BMI. The study, by American Cancer Society researchers, fails to confirm previous findings that body shape itself is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. The current study appears in the April 2014 issue of Cancer Causes, and Control. [More]

NICE recommends FIRMAGON for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer in adults with spinal metastases

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) today issued its Final Appraisal Determination (FAD) recommending FIRMAGON (degarelix) as an option for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer, only in adults with spinal metastases who present with signs or symptoms of spinal cord compression. [More]

Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

With growing evidence that a measurement of the buildup of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) researchers found that the process of "calcium scoring" was also accurate in predicting the chances of dying of heart disease among adults with little or no known risk of heart disease. [More]

Hospital sees success by temporarily connecting major blood vessels

Doctors at Henry Ford Hospital reached a medical milestone April 3, performing the 25th successful transcatheter valve replacement using a novel way to access the heart. [More]