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ACHA reports that nearly 2 million adults living with CHD in the U.S.

ACHA reports that nearly 2 million adults living with CHD in the U.S.

At one time, many children born with congenital heart disease (CHD) suffered from issues that carried fatal prognoses. [More]
Nurtur earns Wellness and Health Promotion Accreditation from NCQA for wellness services

Nurtur earns Wellness and Health Promotion Accreditation from NCQA for wellness services

Centene Corporation today announced that Nurtur, its health and wellness company serving employers, health plans and government programs, has received a three-year Wellness and Health Promotion Accreditation renewal from the National Committee for Quality Assurance for its wellness services. [More]
Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Women veterans who had specialized heart tests were younger and more likely to be obese, depressed and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder than men veterans, according to a study published in an American Heart Association journal. [More]
Single-step fermentative method may facilitate industrial-scale statin drug production

Single-step fermentative method may facilitate industrial-scale statin drug production

University of Manchester researchers, together with industrial partner DSM, have developed a single-step fermentative method for the production of leading cholesterol-lowering drug, pravastatin, which will facilitate industrial-scale statin drug production. [More]
Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

A study on European children concludes that spending more than two hours a day in front of a screen increases the probability of high blood pressure by 30%. The article also points out that doing no daily physical activity or doing less than an hour a day increases this risk by 50%. [More]
Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Men lead women in the likelihood to die from nearly all the most common causes of death. Still, men are less likely to go to the doctor than women and often try to ignore symptoms of health problems. [More]
Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

People with disabilities have unmet medical needs and poorer overall health throughout their lives, and as a result should be recognized as a health disparity group so more attention can be directed to improving their quality of life, a team of policy researchers has found. [More]
Filipino women who move to Canada face breast cancer risk at younger age

Filipino women who move to Canada face breast cancer risk at younger age

Filipinos who move to Canada are diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age than women from other parts of East Asia or Caucasians, new research has found. [More]
Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls who live in rural areas are more likely than their male counterparts to have undiagnosed asthma, and they often are at a higher risk of depression, according to researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. [More]
Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix, which breaks up blood clots during heart attacks and other arterial diseases. [More]
Body hang-ups prevent UK women to have health checkup, finds new HeartAge research

Body hang-ups prevent UK women to have health checkup, finds new HeartAge research

New research revealed today by HeartAge has found that almost four million British women are putting their own health at risk, as they are too embarrassed to have a health check. [More]
Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Scientists combine principles of butterfly effect and computer simulation to predict heart disease

Scientists combine principles of butterfly effect and computer simulation to predict heart disease

Scientists from Cardiff and Swansea Universities are combining the principles of the butterfly effect and computer simulation to explore new ways of predicting and controlling the beginnings of heart disease. [More]
Discovery could help scientists treat heart problems

Discovery could help scientists treat heart problems

The average heart beats 35 million times a year - 2.5 billion times over a lifetime. Those beats must be precisely calibrated; even a small divergence from the metronomic rhythm can cause sudden death. For decades, scientists have wondered exactly how the heart stays so precisely on rhythm even though it contains so many moving parts. [More]
New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

The use of statins may not be associated with lowering risk for Parkinson's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The findings cast doubts on reports suggesting that the cholesterol-lowering medications may protect against this neurodegenerative brain disorder. [More]
New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants that are found in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems that can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major cause of obesity, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. [More]
MIT chemical engineers develop new type of self-healing hydrogel

MIT chemical engineers develop new type of self-healing hydrogel

Scientists are interested in using gels to deliver drugs because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload over a specified time period. However, current versions aren't always practical because must be implanted surgically. [More]
Study: Definitive indicator of diabetes control deceptively high in African-American children

Study: Definitive indicator of diabetes control deceptively high in African-American children

A new study confirms the findings of two earlier LSU Health New Orleans studies that the definitive indicator of diabetes control, the HbA1c, is deceptively high in African-American children. [More]
First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

Two dozen scientific papers published online simultaneously on Feb. 18, 2015 present the first comprehensive maps and analyses of the epigenomes of a wide array of human cell and tissue types. Epigenomes are patterns of chemical annotations to the genome that determine whether, how, and when genes are activated. [More]