Heart Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Disease News and Research

Dementia decline heralds hope of reduced burden

Dementia decline heralds hope of reduced burden

Analysis of participants in the Framingham Heart Study has shown a decline in dementia over a period of 3 decades. [More]
Atypical heart attack symptoms lead to delayed treatment, increased injury in women

Atypical heart attack symptoms lead to delayed treatment, increased injury in women

When having a heart attack, most people will experience some kind of chest pain or pressure that worsens. Pain and pressure, along with sweating, shortness of breath and pain that migrates into the arms or neck are the typical heart attack symptoms. [More]
Poor physical fitness in middle age linked to smaller brain size 20 years later

Poor physical fitness in middle age linked to smaller brain size 20 years later

Poor physical fitness in middle age may be linked to a smaller brain size 20 years later, according to a study published in the February 10, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study: High-cholesterol diet or eating eggs do not increase risk of cardiovascular diseases

Study: High-cholesterol diet or eating eggs do not increase risk of cardiovascular diseases

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease. Furthermore, no association was found among those with the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism and is common among the Finnish population. [More]
Cardiac MRI imaging assesses myocardial damage

Cardiac MRI imaging assesses myocardial damage

In a world-first, researchers from Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) have performed cardiac MRI imaging using a 7T MRI scanner in a patient-based study. [More]
Vanderbilt physicians examine risk factors for cardiovascular disease in prostate cancer survivors

Vanderbilt physicians examine risk factors for cardiovascular disease in prostate cancer survivors

The 3 million prostate cancer survivors in the United States are likely to die from something other than cancer, thanks to early detection, effective treatment and the disease's slow progression. [More]
Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Components in red raspberries may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic stabilizing activity, according to a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature published in the January issue of Advances in Nutrition. [More]
Diet containing unsaturated fats positively impacts weight loss and heart health markers

Diet containing unsaturated fats positively impacts weight loss and heart health markers

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that a diet containing unsaturated fats, such as those found in walnuts and olive oil, has similar weight loss effects as a lower fat, higher-carbohydrate diet. [More]
Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Diet, exercise, a good night's sleep -- all sound recommendations for mitigating one's risk for everything from heart disease to diabetes and, as it turns out, Alzheimer's. [More]
TBX5 gene expression could play key role in congenital heart disease

TBX5 gene expression could play key role in congenital heart disease

Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the leading cause of all infant deaths in the United States. Mutations in the gene TBX5 have been shown to cause both rare and more prevalent forms of congenital heart disease, yet the underlying mechanisms have remained unclear. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Despite considerable advances in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS over the past 30 years, HIV infection rates have remained stagnant in the United States for the past decade. A study by researchers at the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute examines links between spending on social services and public health and AIDS deaths in the United States. [More]
New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

A new study has found a steep decline in the number of scholarly papers about basic science published in leading medical journals in the last 20 years. [More]

Edwards Lifesciences' global sales grow 8.6% to $671.1 million in fourth quarter 2015

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical care monitoring, today reported financial results for the quarter ended December 31, 2015. [More]
Depression symptoms increase risk for heart disease, stroke in middle-aged and older adults

Depression symptoms increase risk for heart disease, stroke in middle-aged and older adults

Depression and its symptoms increase as people age, and have been linked to heart disease and stroke in both middle-aged and older adults. But whether depression and its symptoms are risk factors for these two dangerous conditions has been unclear. [More]
Study reveals increased mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy

Study reveals increased mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy

In a study to be presented on Feb. 5 at 8 a.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, Long-term mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy (HDP). [More]
Researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth using nanoparticles

Researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth using nanoparticles

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers has demonstrated in mice a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
Gender associated with risk of cardiovascular recurrence in adults

Gender associated with risk of cardiovascular recurrence in adults

Sex (biological and physiological characteristics) differences are increasingly being studied to assess symptoms, risk factors and outcomes for various diseases. Now, a new pan-Canadian study led by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, suggests that gender rather than sex is associated with the risk of recurrence of cardiovascular events in adults. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

People who are fit are more likely to survive their first heart attack, according to a study of nearly 70,000 patients of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

Consumers are beginning to embrace mobile tools for heart health—but not enough. A January HealthMine survey of 501 consumers with known heart disease and/or risk found that just 27% of people are using an activity tracker. Only 16% say they are using their tracker to manage their heart condition/risk. Yet 74% of those who do use an activity tracker report the device is helping them cope with their heart condition. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement