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Appropriate traffic signs could help improve road safety for bicyclists and motorists

Appropriate traffic signs could help improve road safety for bicyclists and motorists

A simple change in the wording of a traffic sign - from "Share the Road" to "Bicycles May Use Full Lane" - could help clarify the rules of the road for bicyclists and motorists, according to a North Carolina State University study. [More]
Global 'Call to Action Summit 2015' adopts DELHI DECLARATION to end preventable maternal and child deaths

Global 'Call to Action Summit 2015' adopts DELHI DECLARATION to end preventable maternal and child deaths

The two-day global 'Call to Action Summit 2015' concluded today with Health Ministers and heads of country delegations from 22 countries adopting the DELHI DECLARATION on 'ending preventable maternal and child deaths'. The declaration was developed as an outcome of the high-level ministerial conclave held yesterday during the summit. [More]
Scientists provide specific recommendations to reduce health risks for beachgoers

Scientists provide specific recommendations to reduce health risks for beachgoers

Beach sand contains all kinds of microorganisms, including those that can harm human health. Yet current guidelines are focused exclusively on monitoring the levels of microbes in the water. [More]
LCA commends Congress for establishing life-saving initiative on lung cancer

LCA commends Congress for establishing life-saving initiative on lung cancer

Today, Laurie Fenton Ambrose, President & CEO of Lung Cancer Alliance (LCA) hailed the establishment of the first bi-partisan Lung Cancer Caucus in the United States House of Representatives and thanked Congressman Rick Nolan (D-MN), Congressman Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ) and Congresswoman Lois Capps (D-CA) for leading this effort. [More]
FDA warns several tobacco manufacturers for marketing their products with health-related claims

FDA warns several tobacco manufacturers for marketing their products with health-related claims

The Food and Drug Administration today has taken a critically important action to protect the American public from tobacco industry deception by warning several manufacturers – most prominently Reynolds American's subsidiary, Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company, and its Natural American Spirit cigarette brand – that they are violating the law by marketing their products with health-related claims, including "additive-free" and "natural." If these products continue to make these claims, the FDA can and should order them removed from the market. [More]
Most American schools implement healthy practices to meet federal school meal standards

Most American schools implement healthy practices to meet federal school meal standards

Most schools in the U.S. are implementing healthy practices to help meet federal school meal standards by offering whole grains, more fruits and vegetables, and reducing sodium content, according to data published today in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Proportion of diabetes patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting rises from 7% to 37% in 40 years

Proportion of diabetes patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting rises from 7% to 37% in 40 years

In the 40 years between 1970-2010, the proportion of patients with diabetes undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) escalated from 7% to 37%. The results of a large study from Cleveland Clinic just published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, the official publication of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, documents the five-fold increase in the proportion of patients with diabetes undergoing this procedure between 1970 and 2010. [More]
Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

About 10 percent of mothers experienced chronic, persistent depressive symptoms two years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people, displacing hundreds of thousands and causing widespread damage estimated at more than $100 billion, according to a Georgia State University study. [More]
Study shows licensed tobacco retailers sell illegal cigarettes throughout NYC

Study shows licensed tobacco retailers sell illegal cigarettes throughout NYC

Licensed tobacco retailers throughout New York City are selling a substantial number of cigarette packs carrying either counterfeit or out-of-state tax stamps, finds an investigation by NYU public health researchers. [More]
Researchers reveal HIV testing trends among older adults

Researchers reveal HIV testing trends among older adults

Researchers led by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health examined HIV testing trends among adults ages 50 through 64 both before and after 2006, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended that most doctors automatically screen all patients for HIV regardless of whether they have symptoms. [More]
Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers trained to perform malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are still prescribing valuable malaria medicines to patients who do not have malaria, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. [More]

Sigma-Aldrich signs agreement with PHE to manufacture, supply bacterial and fungal NCTC/NCPF CRMs

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, a leading Life Science and Technology Company, today announced it has signed an agreement with Public Health England to manufacture and supply bacterial and fungal NCTC/NCPF Certified Reference Materials (CRM) in LENTICULE disc format worldwide for use as controls in food, water, environmental and clinical testing microbiology laboratories. [More]
Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

An automated speech analysis program correctly differentiated between at-risk young people who developed psychosis over a two-and-a-half year period and those who did not. In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center found that the computerized analysis provided a more accurate classification than clinical ratings. [More]
Founder of ACPA discusses how patient with chronic pain can tackle their NSAID usage

Founder of ACPA discusses how patient with chronic pain can tackle their NSAID usage

When a patient with chronic pain is experiencing symptoms, relief is only thing on their mind. NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, can often provide that relief, however it's important to balance the potential benefits with the potential risks of these drugs. [More]
Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study published in the August 26, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

An oral cholera vaccine that is in short supply could treat more people and save more lives in crisis situations, if one dose were dispensed instead of the recommended two, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]

Awareness of mortality can be injurious to health, new research reveals

People with low self-esteem use a variety of escape mechanisms to avoid thinking about their own mortality, new research reveals. Researchers led by Dr Arnaud Wisman, of the University of Kent's School of Psychology, found evidence in five studies that people with low self-esteem respond to reminders of their own mortality by directing their focus away from the 'self'. [More]
Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

What do a prominent physiologist and two-time survivor of pancreatic cancer and a world-renowned researcher whose landmark discoveries on aspirin, drug therapies of proven benefit and therapeutic lifestyle changes that have saved more than 1.1 million lives have in common? They are both passionate about the importance of regular physical activity in reducing risks of dying from heart attacks and strokes, as well as developing diabetes, hypertension and colon cancer. And more importantly, enhancing mental health and fostering healthy muscles, bones and joints in all Americans from childhood to the elderly. [More]
New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

Obese women are nearly twice as likely as their lean counterparts to have stillborn babies for several specific, potentially preventable medical reasons, a new University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis reveals. [More]
Drinking 500ml of water before meals may help obese adults to lose weight

Drinking 500ml of water before meals may help obese adults to lose weight

Researchers from the University of Birmingham have shown that drinking 500ml of water at half an hour before eating main meals may help obese adults to lose weight. They believe that the simple intervention could be hugely beneficial, and be easily promoted by healthcare professionals and through public health campaigns. [More]
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