Public Health News and Research RSS Feed - Public Health News and Research

EpiPen (epinephrine) emergency kits now available at Montreal Bell Centre for treating severe allergies

EpiPen (epinephrine) emergency kits now available at Montreal Bell Centre for treating severe allergies

Pfizer Canada Inc., the distributor of EpiPen, and the Montreal Bell Centre are pleased to announce that EpiPen (epinephrine) emergency kits are now available at the Bell Centre, home of the Montreal Canadiens hockey team. The new partnership strives to offer a safeguarded environment for visitors at risk of serious allergic reactions during hockey games, concerts and other entertainment events. [More]
Merck announces availability of GARDASIL 9 HPV vaccine in Canada

Merck announces availability of GARDASIL 9 HPV vaccine in Canada

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, announced today that GARDASIL 9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant), Merck's 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, is now available in Canada. [More]
GEBN makes meaningful contributions to improve public health

GEBN makes meaningful contributions to improve public health

As the scientific community gathers at Experimental Biology 2015, the Global Energy Balance Network is poised to make meaningful contributions to the broader community's efforts to improve public health. GEBN is a network of scientists from North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania who have banded together to further the understanding of the regulation of energy utilization by the body (energy balance) and apply this understanding to develop novel approaches to health and wellness. [More]
Loneliness, social isolation can lead to increased health care use in older adults

Loneliness, social isolation can lead to increased health care use in older adults

Experiences of loneliness and social isolation can lead to increased health care use among older adults, according to new research from the University of Georgia College of Public Health. [More]

Increasing alcohol taxes reduces fatal alcohol-related car crashes in Illinois

Increasing state alcohol taxes could prevent thousands of deaths a year from car crashes, say University of Florida Health researchers, who found alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes decreased after taxes on beer, wine and spirits went up in Illinois. [More]
Uganda Newborn Study explores ways to improve child mortality rates

Uganda Newborn Study explores ways to improve child mortality rates

In Uganda, child mortality rates are improving, but progress is slower for deaths occurring in the first four weeks of life, or the newborn period, and for stillbirths. But recent evidence from local researchers show that a cost-effective package of care linking families, government-mandated village health teams (a form of community health workers), and health facilities can improve life-saving practices during pregnancy, childbirth and in the first weeks of life; and benefit poorest families the most. [More]
High levels of pesticide residues in fruits, vegetables can affect semen quality

High levels of pesticide residues in fruits, vegetables can affect semen quality

Men who ate fruits and vegetables with higher levels of pesticide residues—such as strawberries, spinach, and peppers—had lower sperm count and a lower percentage of normal sperm than those who ate produce with lower residue levels, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
Moon does not influence timing of human births, hospital admissions, says UCLA scientist

Moon does not influence timing of human births, hospital admissions, says UCLA scientist

"It must be a full moon" is a common refrain when things appear more hectic than usual. The moon is even blamed when things get crazy at hospital emergency rooms or birth wards. "Some nurses ascribe the apparent chaos to the moon, but dozens of studies show that the belief is unfounded," said Jean-Luc Margot, a UCLA professor of planetary astronomy. [More]
Study provides insights into basis for cognitive dysfunction

Study provides insights into basis for cognitive dysfunction

Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have identified a unique pattern of immune molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) that provides insights into the basis for cognitive dysfunction--frequently described by patients as "brain fog"--as well as new hope for improvements in diagnosis and treatment. [More]
New HCV therapies cost-effective in specific groups of HCV-infected patients

New HCV therapies cost-effective in specific groups of HCV-infected patients

A study led by Boston Medical Center researchers demonstrates that while new therapies to treat Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are highly effective, they are cost-effective and provide the greatest value in specific groups of HCV-infected patients. [More]
Antibodies from dromedary camels may prove therapeutic for MERS patients

Antibodies from dromedary camels may prove therapeutic for MERS patients

Antibodies from dromedary camels protected uninfected mice from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and helped infected mice expunge the disease, according to a study published online March 18th in the Journal of Virology, a journal published by the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Drug-resistant E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated endoscopes in Washington state hospital

Drug-resistant E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated endoscopes in Washington state hospital

An outbreak of a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain resistant to antibiotics has been linked to contaminated endoscopes in a Washington state hospital. The study indicates that industry standard cleaning guidelines, which were exceeded by hospital staff, may not be sufficient for sterilizing endoscopes adequately. [More]
Study provides insights into climate, social factors that trigger dengue outbreaks

Study provides insights into climate, social factors that trigger dengue outbreaks

Researchers at Upstate Medical University, in collaboration with a team of international investigators studying dengue fever, have discovered new information on climate drivers of the disease and social risk factors that may be contributing to its spread, according to two scientific papers recently published in BMC Infectious Disease and BMC Public Health, open access, peer-reviewed online journals. [More]
Workplace wellness programs can help people lose weight

Workplace wellness programs can help people lose weight

A new study shows that workplace wellness programs can be effective in helping people lose weight by providing healthier food choices and increasing opportunities for physical activity, particularly if these efforts are designed with the input and active participation of employees. [More]
Ebola epidemic reveals critical weaknesses in global public health system

Ebola epidemic reveals critical weaknesses in global public health system

In the year since the World Health Organization (WHO) was first notified of an outbreak of what proved to be Ebola virus disease in the west African country of Guinea, more than 24,000 cases have been reported and over 10,000 individuals have died - primarily in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. [More]
Synthetic Biologics begins SYN-004 Phase 2a clinical trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics begins SYN-004 Phase 2a clinical trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced the initiation of a Phase 2a clinical trial to evaluate the gastrointestinal (GI) antibiotic-degrading effects and the safety of SYN-004, the Company's investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme designed to protect the microbiome and prevent C. difficile infection (CDI). [More]
First global model for predicting CVD risk

First global model for predicting CVD risk

Researchers have developed the first global model for predicting cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The model—developed by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Imperial College London, and colleagues—will be of particular help to public health professionals, clinicians, and patients in developing countries for prevention of CVD. [More]
Researchers find strong relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and behavioral impairment

Researchers find strong relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and behavioral impairment

Researchers at the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and colleagues at Columbia University's Center for Children's Environmental Health have found a powerful relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control. [More]
Study quantifies long-term effects of nutrition deprivation at different stages of pregnancy

Study quantifies long-term effects of nutrition deprivation at different stages of pregnancy

A study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues in the Netherlands evaluated the relationship between nutritional conditions in very early life and adult health, and found that famine exposure during the first pregnancy trimester was associated with increases in mortality from a variety of causes other than cancer or cardiovascular disease. [More]
New study estimates UK hospital costs of hip fracture

New study estimates UK hospital costs of hip fracture

A new study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases reveals the high cost of first and subsequent hip fractures to the healthcare system in the UK. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement