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Parents' views on safety and benefits of vaccines have shifted, finds new poll

Parents' views on safety and benefits of vaccines have shifted, finds new poll

Over the same time period that multiple outbreaks of measles and whooping cough made headlines around the country, parents' views on vaccines became more favorable, according to a new nationally-representative poll. [More]
28th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology to take place in Amsterdam

28th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology to take place in Amsterdam

Europe's largest meeting for the science and treatment of disorders of the brain, the 28th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology will take place at the Amsterdam RAI from 29 August to 1 September 2015. [More]
UTHealth School of Public Health working to improve health of Hispanics living along Texas-Mexico border

UTHealth School of Public Health working to improve health of Hispanics living along Texas-Mexico border

Sylvia Hernando became a Community Health Worker (CHW) because she wanted to help others. Hernando had been a stay-at-home mother and was looking to go back to school when she heard about the CHW certification program at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Everyone knows that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but much remains unknown about how the benefits arise, and what to expect in different people who exercise to improve their health. To gain a more precise understanding of how exercise improves health and whom it helps most, researchers analyzed the results of 160 randomized clinical trials with nearly 7,500 participants. [More]
Creating more effective vaccines against flu virus

Creating more effective vaccines against flu virus

Flu vaccines can be something of a shot in the dark. Not only must they be given yearly, there's no guarantee the strains against which they protect will be the ones circulating once the season arrives. New research by Rockefeller University scientists and their colleagues suggests it may be possible to harness a previously unknown mechanism within the immune system to create more effective and efficient vaccines against this ever-mutating virus. [More]
Health and social messages cause confusion, stigma that can undermine mother's confidence

Health and social messages cause confusion, stigma that can undermine mother's confidence

Pregnancy and motherhood are both wonderful and worrisome times - could public health campaigns and social stereotypes be contributing to anxiety for mothers? [More]
One-third of US population provides unpaid care to another person, study shows

One-third of US population provides unpaid care to another person, study shows

There has been much recent discussion in the press of the plight of the so-called "sandwich generation," that is, adults who are responsible for the care of children as well as aging parents. [More]
Selling healthier foods not only improves eating habits, but also increases revenue

Selling healthier foods not only improves eating habits, but also increases revenue

A pilot program designed to encourage mom and pop carryout shops in Baltimore to promote and sell healthier menu items not only improved eating habits, but also increased the stores' gross revenue by an average 25 percent, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research found. [More]
Mortality rates vary depending on socioeconomic differences among areas in Europe

Mortality rates vary depending on socioeconomic differences among areas in Europe

For a number of years now, scientific literature has questioned whether mortality rates depend on socioeconomic differences among the population. Recently, a new study carried out in 15 European cities - including Barcelona and Madrid - detected inequalities for the majority of causes, concluding that higher levels of poverty are associated with higher mortality rates and there is a great deal of variation among areas. [More]
Educational messages about naloxone's lifesaving benefits can bolster support for its use

Educational messages about naloxone's lifesaving benefits can bolster support for its use

While most Americans do not support policies designed to increase distribution of naloxone - a medication that reverses the effects of a drug overdose - certain types of educational messages about its lifesaving benefits may bolster support for its use, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Two South Dakota State University researchers awarded NASA grant to combat West Nile virus

Two South Dakota State University researchers awarded NASA grant to combat West Nile virus

Through a three-year NASA grant, two South Dakota State University researchers will help mosquito control officials use mosquito surveillance and environmental data to target West Nile virus. [More]
Eating at full-service restaurants not necessarily healthier than eating at fast-food outlets

Eating at full-service restaurants not necessarily healthier than eating at fast-food outlets

When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports. They also take in more fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium than those who prepare and eat their meals at home. [More]
Study identifies trends in use of antipsychotic medications in young people in the U.S.

Study identifies trends in use of antipsychotic medications in young people in the U.S.

Despite concerns that use of antipsychotic medications in treating young people has increased, use actually declined between 2006 and 2010 for children ages 12 and under, and increased for adolescents and young adults. [More]
Extreme heat and precipitation events linked to increased risk of Salmonella infections

Extreme heat and precipitation events linked to increased risk of Salmonella infections

Extreme heat and precipitation events, which are expected to increase in frequency and intensity due to climate change, are associated with increased risk of Salmonella infections, according to a study led by researchers from the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]
Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed foods could substantially cut cardiac deaths

Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed foods could substantially cut cardiac deaths

Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed food would help tackle inequalities in coronary heart disease that lead to excess deaths in deprived areas of England, according to research by the University of Liverpool. [More]
R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named R. Rodney Howell, MD, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Chairman Emeritus of Pediatrics, and Member of the Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, as the first recipient of its new, annual Advocacy Award. [More]
Participation in extracurricular activities predicts self-discipline in preteens

Participation in extracurricular activities predicts self-discipline in preteens

Regular, structured extracurricular sports seem to help kids develop the discipline they need in order to engage effectively in the classroom, according to a new study led by Linda Pagani of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital. [More]
New collection of papers adds to mounting evidence of gut microbiome’s influential role in health

New collection of papers adds to mounting evidence of gut microbiome’s influential role in health

A newly released collection of papers, the result of the Gut in Focus Symposium Nobel Forum held earlier this year, is adding to the mounting evidence of the influential role the gut microbiome plays in health. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

A University of Georgia researcher is lead author on an international paper on folate biomarkers as part of an initiative to provide evidence-based guidance for the global nutrition and public health community. [More]
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