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Scientists develop microbicide gel that prevents transmission of multiple STIs in vagina/rectum in animals

Scientists develop microbicide gel that prevents transmission of multiple STIs in vagina/rectum in animals

Population Council scientists and their partners have found that their proprietary microbicide gel is safe, stable, and can prevent the transmission of multiple sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in both the vagina and rectum in animals: HIV, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), and human papillomavirus (HPV). [More]

Study: Chronic inflammation associated with aggressive prostate cancer

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]

IMA World Health offers Safe Motherhood Kits this Mother's Day

Every minute, a woman dies of complications from pregnancy or childbirth and many more suffer infection or injury. [More]
Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

Special supplement explores the causes of distracted driving among teens

Motor vehicle crashes rank as the leading cause of teen deaths and in 2008, 16% of all distraction-related fatal automobile crashes involved drivers under 20 years of age. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]
Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

A team that includes scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Johns Hopkins University and St. Mary's University reported the structure of a protein that helps a common fungus to infect the body. [More]
Study: HIV-positive women respond well to vaccine against human papillomavirus

Study: HIV-positive women respond well to vaccine against human papillomavirus

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. [More]

Researchers explore fishing-related injuries and prevention strategies

Handling frozen fish caused nearly half of all injuries aboard commercial freezer-trawlers and about a quarter of the injuries on freezer-longliner vessels operating off the coast of Alaska, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
Scientists to combine environmental, surveillance data to predict malaria outbreaks in Ethiopia

Scientists to combine environmental, surveillance data to predict malaria outbreaks in Ethiopia

Dealing with malaria is a fact of life for more than 91 million Ethiopians. Each year four to five million contract malaria, one of the biggest health problems in this poor country. [More]

Study analyzes data to assess health disparities of transgender individuals

Transgender individuals are medically underserved and their healthcare needs incompletely understood in part because they represent a subpopulation whose health is rarely monitored by U.S. national surveillance systems. [More]
Scientists report new approach to restore penicillin's combat effectiveness against bacterial infections

Scientists report new approach to restore penicillin's combat effectiveness against bacterial infections

Penicillin, one of the scientific marvels of the 20th century, is currently losing a lot of battles it once won against bacterial infections. But scientists at the University of South Carolina have just reported a new approach to restoring its combat effectiveness, even against so-called "superbugs." [More]
Viewpoints: Obamacare dilemma -- some people dislike the law but embrace its provisions; are health costs falling?

Viewpoints: Obamacare dilemma -- some people dislike the law but embrace its provisions; are health costs falling?

Polls have consistently shown that even though the public opposes Obamacare, people like some of its most significant provisions. That's particularly true of the requirement that insurers ignore preexisting conditions when signing up customers for coverage. [More]

Majority of women experience increased amount and duration of bleeding episodes, say researchers

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it's normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition. [More]
Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health. [More]
Feminine girls, masculine boys more likely to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks

Feminine girls, masculine boys more likely to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity-the most "feminine" girls and the most "masculine" boys-are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. [More]
Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

In a study of nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs, researchers from the Bloomberg School of Public health found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a frequently prescribed treatment for depression, anxiety and other disorders, was associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delays (DD) in boys. [More]

Alarming increases in diabetes and pre-diabetes cases in the U.S.

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with obesity apparently to blame for the surge. The researchers also found that the burden of the disease has not hit all groups equally, with alarming increases in diabetes in blacks, Hispanics and the elderly. [More]

Researchers examine relationship between vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment

Vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment are common in older adults, but there isn't a lot of conclusive research into whether there's a relationship between the two. [More]
Pitt CVR and Sanofi Pasteur join forces to help assess effectiveness of dengue vaccine

Pitt CVR and Sanofi Pasteur join forces to help assess effectiveness of dengue vaccine

The University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research (CVR) and Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, have entered a scientific collaboration to help assess the effectiveness of a dengue vaccine once introduced for immunization programs. [More]