Public Health News and Research RSS Feed - Public Health News and Research

Viewpoints: GOP's 2015 Obamacare opportunities; the need for community health workers; WHO's Ebola response

Viewpoints: GOP's 2015 Obamacare opportunities; the need for community health workers; WHO's Ebola response

In another sign that the politics of Obamacare continue to shift, the Medicaid expansion is now all but certain to come to another big state whose Republican governor had previously resisted it: Pennsylvania. ... The details of the final deal will matter. But broadly speaking this looks like another sign of just how hard it is for Republican governors in non-deep-red states to resist the expansion -; and of how the politics of this issue continue to change (Greg Sargent, 8/28). [More]
State highlights: States seek health care autonomy; L.A. nursing home audit; promoting overdose-reversal drug

State highlights: States seek health care autonomy; L.A. nursing home audit; promoting overdose-reversal drug

Kansas, Missouri and seven other states have signed on to a movement that would wrest regulation of most of the nation's health care insurance systems from the federal government. [More]
New method to predict optimal place and number of automated external defibrillators

New method to predict optimal place and number of automated external defibrillators

A new method to predict the optimal number and location of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) was presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Benjamin Dahan from France. [More]
New paper highlights ways to improve outcomes of Ebola virus infection

New paper highlights ways to improve outcomes of Ebola virus infection

The largest-ever Ebola virus disease outbreak is ravaging West Africa, but with more personnel, basic monitoring, and supportive treatment, many of the sickest patients with Ebola virus disease do not need to die, note the authors of a new paper published ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Youth who have used e-cigarettes are more likely to try conventional cigarettes

Youth who have used e-cigarettes are more likely to try conventional cigarettes

A recent study by a Georgia State University scientist and her colleagues with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that youth who have never even touched a regular tobacco cigarette -- but have ever used e-cigarettes -- are more likely to report that they may try conventional cigarettes. [More]
NIH to begin trials for experimental Ebola vaccine

NIH to begin trials for experimental Ebola vaccine

The announcement about the testing comes as the outbreak in West Africa grows. The World Health Organizations says it could have infected more than 20,000 people. [More]
Tax on sugar-sweetened beverages may reduce obesity in adolescents, say researchers

Tax on sugar-sweetened beverages may reduce obesity in adolescents, say researchers

Childhood obesity in the United States remains high. A tax on sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, energy drinks, sweet teas, and sports drinks would reduce obesity in adolescents more than other policies, such as exercise or an advertising ban, and would also generate significant revenue for additional obesity prevention activities, say researchers writing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
First Edition: August 29, 2014

First Edition: August 29, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including reports about the Obama administration and Pennsylvania reaching an agreement to expand Medicaid in that state. [More]
Physically active men are at lower risk of nocturia

Physically active men are at lower risk of nocturia

Men who are physically active are at lower risk of nocturia (waking up at night to urinate), according to a study led by a Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center receives NCORP grant to conduct cancer clinical trials

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center receives NCORP grant to conduct cancer clinical trials

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has received an $18 million, five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute's Community Oncology Research Program to design and conduct community-based, multi-center screening, prevention and control cancer clinical trials. [More]
Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

In a comprehensive review of recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies of diabetes and nutrition, Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard School of Public Health investigators have identified specific foods and dietary patterns that are beneficial in preventing and controlling diabetes. [More]
International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa. [More]
NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

Initial human testing of an investigational vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will begin next week by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Peer groups, clinicians play critical role in development of effective breastfeeding programs

Peer groups, clinicians play critical role in development of effective breastfeeding programs

The support of peer groups and clinicians is critical to the development of effective breastfeeding programs, according to recent University of Georgia research. [More]
Lifestyle factors modify vision impairment risk

Lifestyle factors modify vision impairment risk

Smoking, drinking alcohol and physical activity are modifiable behaviours that influence the risk of vision impairment, show findings from the Beaver Dam Eye Study. [More]
HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]
Suggestions for successful breast feeding from nurse midwifery program

Suggestions for successful breast feeding from nurse midwifery program

Most new moms know the benefits of breast feeding. For babies, it can lower the risk of developing asthma, diabetes, and leukemia. For moms, it reduces the risk of breast cancer. But many women still don't know where to turn for help when breast feeding doesn't go as smoothly as they imagined it would. [More]
Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for not vaccinating

Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for not vaccinating

Not all students returning to school this month will be up to date on their vaccinations. A new study conducted by Jennifer Reich, a researcher at the University of Colorado Denver, shows that the reasons why children may not be fully vaccinated depends on the class privilege of their mothers. [More]
Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration

Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration

Nocturnal awakenings are frequent among 6-month-old children, but sharing bed might make things worse. [More]
Contaminated blood cultures can serve as diagnostic predictor for more targeted antibiotics

Contaminated blood cultures can serve as diagnostic predictor for more targeted antibiotics

Some 30 percent of all positive hospital blood culture samples are discarded every day because they're "contaminated" - they reflect the presence of skin germs instead of specific disease-causing bacteria. [More]