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C Diff Foundation to present 2014 "Raising C.difficile Awareness" conference in November

C Diff Foundation to present 2014 "Raising C.difficile Awareness" conference in November

C Diff Foundation is proud to present the 2014 "Raising C.difficile Awareness" conference. Join us November 4th at 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Student Center, West 828 S. Wolcott Avenue, Thompson Room, Chicago, IL. [More]
Kaiser Permanente supports AHA to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans

Kaiser Permanente supports AHA to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans

Kaiser Permanente, the nation's largest integrated health care system, will support the American Heart Association in a broad effort to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans in two U.S. cities over three years. [More]
Researchers encourage efforts that benefit public health and environment

Researchers encourage efforts that benefit public health and environment

The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
UTHealth study examines effects of smoking policy change at homeless shelter

UTHealth study examines effects of smoking policy change at homeless shelter

Instituting a partial smoking ban at a homeless shelter can lead to a reduction in expired carbon monoxide levels, an indicator of exposure to cigarette smoke, and may have positive effects on shelter residents' health, according to new research. The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston released the study results last week in the journal Addictive Behaviors. [More]
Experts to study how improved support for dementia carers can enhance quality of life

Experts to study how improved support for dementia carers can enhance quality of life

Experts will explore how improved support and powers for people caring for loved-ones with dementia can improve quality of life for both patients and carers around the UK. [More]
Caltech researcher explores link between variable heart rate, health and fitness

Caltech researcher explores link between variable heart rate, health and fitness

Although the heart beats out a very familiar "lub-dub" pattern that speeds up or slows down as our activity increases or decreases, the pattern itself isn't as regular as you might think. In fact, the amount of time between heartbeats can vary even at a "constant" heart rate-and that variability, doctors have found, is a good thing. [More]
Viewpoints: CHIP funding needed; GOP's flawed plan to make 'the pill' OTC; millennials' health issues

Viewpoints: CHIP funding needed; GOP's flawed plan to make 'the pill' OTC; millennials' health issues

Federal financing for a beneficial health insurance program for low-income children, known as the Children's Health Insurance Program or CHIP, will run out next year unless Congress agrees to extend it. Bills are pending in both the House and the Senate to extend financing for four years, to 2019. Congress should approve the extension in the lame-duck session after the midterm elections so that families and state officials will know what the future holds. The program needs to be maintained amid uncertainty as to whether other good coverage will be available for these children (9/21). [More]
Study examines relationship between maternal iron intake and offspring autism risk

Study examines relationship between maternal iron intake and offspring autism risk

Mothers of children with autism are significantly less likely to report taking iron supplements before and during their pregnancies than the mothers of children who are developing normally, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. [More]
Leidos awarded NMLC contract to provide services in support of HIV/AIDS prevention programs

Leidos awarded NMLC contract to provide services in support of HIV/AIDS prevention programs

Leidos, a national security, health, and engineering solutions company, was awarded a prime contract by the Naval Medical Logistics Command to provide services in support of the Naval Health Research Center's, Department of Defense, HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP). [More]
Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a new study co-led by a Rutgers researcher. [More]

C-Path renews grant to advance more effective drug treatments for TB

The Critical Path Institute, an independent, non-profit organization that works to accelerate the speed of drug and medical product development, today announced it has received a three-year grant renewal from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
State policies fail to provide sufficient two-generation supports to families with young children

State policies fail to provide sufficient two-generation supports to families with young children

Recent two-generation approaches to reducing poverty that help children and their parents are receiving increasing attention from researchers, advocates, and foundations. [More]
New Ebola cases could reach 6,800 in West Africa by September end

New Ebola cases could reach 6,800 in West Africa by September end

New research published today in the online journal PLoS Outbreaks predicts new Ebola cases could reach 6,800 in West Africa by the end of the month if new control measures are not enacted. [More]
Innovative study looks at how children define play

Innovative study looks at how children define play

While public health authorities focus on the physical activity benefits of active play, a new study from the University of Montreal reveals that for children, playing has no goal - it is an end in itself, an activity that is fun, done alone or with friends, and it represents "an opportunity to experience excitement or pleasure, but also to combat boredom, sadness, fear, or loneliness." [More]
Viewpoints: Ezekiel Emanuel's choice of an age to die; new enrollment numbers still confusing

Viewpoints: Ezekiel Emanuel's choice of an age to die; new enrollment numbers still confusing

Seventy-five. That's how long I want to live: 75 years. This preference drives my daughters crazy. It drives my brothers crazy. My loving friends think I am crazy. They think that I can't mean what I say; that I haven't thought clearly about this, because there is so much in the world to see and do. To convince me of my errors, they enumerate the myriad people I know who are over 75 and doing quite well. They are certain that as I get closer to 75, I will push the desired age back to 80, then 85, maybe even 90. I am sure of my position. [More]
Private efforts to address mental health needs of veterans could aid VA health system reform

Private efforts to address mental health needs of veterans could aid VA health system reform

A unique partnership to support private efforts to provide mental health services to veterans and their families could provide a model for similar efforts should federal officials decide to expand privately provided health care as part of reform of the VA health system, according to a new RAND Corporation report. [More]

UN approves resolutions to create UNMEER to contain ongoing Ebola outbreak

Nearly six months after the first case of Ebola in West Africa was reported to the World Health Organization, the United Nations General Assembly and the Security Council have approved resolutions creating the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response to contain the ongoing outbreak which has sickened more than 5,500 people and killed over 2,500. [More]
Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

There are many kinds of cancer, but treatments have typically combatted them in one way only: by attempting to destroy the cancerous cells. Surgery aims to remove the entire growth from the body; chemotherapy drugs are toxic to the cancer cells; radiation generates toxic molecules that break up the cancer cells' DNA and proteins, causing their demise. [More]
Socially disadvantaged women experience poor maternal care in the UK

Socially disadvantaged women experience poor maternal care in the UK

Women from lower socioeconomic groups in the UK report a poorer experience of care during pregnancy and there needs to be a greater focus on their care, suggests a new study published today (17 September) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. [More]
LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

Research led by Paulo Rodriguez, PhD, an assistant research professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans' Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has identified the crucial role an inflammatory protein known as Chop plays in the body's ability to fight cancer. [More]