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DePaul University experts available to discuss different health care topics

DePaul University experts available to discuss different health care topics

With the fifth anniversary of the presidential signing of the U.S. Affordable Care Act March 23, faculty experts from DePaul University are available to discuss a range of health care topics including the analysis of health care data, community health, patient experience, communication among health care professionals, interprofessional health care education and the role of nurses and physician assistants. [More]
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics highlights positive effects of human milk on infants, maternal health

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics highlights positive effects of human milk on infants, maternal health

Human milk provides the best nutrition for most babies and breastfeeding provides the best nutrition for infants and very young children, according to an updated position paper from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. [More]
Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals estimated to cost EU €157 billion a year

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals estimated to cost EU €157 billion a year

A new economic analysis found exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals likely costs the European Union €157 billion ($209 billion) a year in actual health care expenses and lost earning potential, according to a new series of studies published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. [More]
Phthalate exposure in pregnancy adversely affects masculinization of male genitals in babies

Phthalate exposure in pregnancy adversely affects masculinization of male genitals in babies

Exposure to hormone-altering chemicals called phthalates - which are found in many plastics, foods and personal care products - early in pregnancy is associated with a disruption in an essential pregnancy hormone and adversely affects the masculinization of male genitals in the baby, according to research led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. [More]
Two persistent organic environmental pollutants affect infant growth

Two persistent organic environmental pollutants affect infant growth

Even though the levels of two environmental pollutants have declined over the last 20 years, they may still have adverse effects on children's development, according to a new study by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. This is the largest study of environmental pollutants and infant growth to date. [More]
Counseling married couples together may help boost their physical activity better

Counseling married couples together may help boost their physical activity better

Your exercise regimen isn't just good for you; it may also be good for your spouse.New research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that if one spouse improves his or her exercise regimen, the other spouse is significantly more likely to follow suit. [More]
New research challenges current theories of ageing

New research challenges current theories of ageing

Older brains may be more similar to younger brains than previously thought. [More]
Psychedelics does not increase risk of mental health problems

Psychedelics does not increase risk of mental health problems

The use of psychedelics, such as LSD and magic mushrooms, does not increase a person's risk of developing mental health problems, according to an analysis of information from more than 135,000 randomly chosen people, including 19,000 people who had used psychedelics. [More]
Phase III trial to test VSV-EBOV vaccine for preventing Ebola to be launched in Guinea

Phase III trial to test VSV-EBOV vaccine for preventing Ebola to be launched in Guinea

Based on promising data from initial clinical trials in late 2014, WHO with the Health Ministry of Guinea, Médecins Sans Frontières, Epicentre and The Norwegian Institute of Public Health, will launch a Phase III trial in Guinea on 7 March to test the VSV-EBOV vaccine for efficacy and effectiveness to prevent Ebola. [More]
New study assesses suicide risks in older, white males with advanced bladder cancer

New study assesses suicide risks in older, white males with advanced bladder cancer

Older, single white males with advanced bladder cancer have the highest suicide risk among those with other cancers of the male genitals and urinary system, researchers report. [More]
Researchers discover retina protein crucial for vision

Researchers discover retina protein crucial for vision

Research led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of the LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, discovered a protein in the retina that is crucial for vision. The paper reports, for the first time, the key molecular mechanisms leading to visual degeneration and blindness. [More]
Finding may help advance experimental approach to improving public health

Finding may help advance experimental approach to improving public health

Scientists have discovered a new way to manipulate how cells function, a finding that might help advance an experimental approach to improving public health: DNA vaccines, which could be more efficient, less expensive and easier to store than traditional vaccines. [More]
USF researchers uncover how malaria-related parasites spread at explosive rates

USF researchers uncover how malaria-related parasites spread at explosive rates

A University of South Florida College of Public Health professor and his team of researchers have become the first to uncover part of the mysterious process by which malaria-related parasites spread at explosive and deadly rates inside humans and other animals. [More]
Symbiomix Therapeutics announces positive results from SYM-1219 Phase 1 clinical program

Symbiomix Therapeutics announces positive results from SYM-1219 Phase 1 clinical program

Symbiomix Therapeutics, a late-stage, privately held biopharmaceutical company developing innovative medicines for serious women's health infections, today announced results from its Phase 1 clinical program demonstrating that its lead product candidate, SYM-1219, was safe and well tolerated and had predictable pharmacokinetics (PK), and that contraceptive efficacy for birth control pills would not be altered by SYM-1219 administration. [More]
Researchers carry out Listeria screening in Vienna’s public lavatories

Researchers carry out Listeria screening in Vienna’s public lavatories

Listeria monocytogenes is a so-called environmental bacterium. It is highly adaptable and resistant. Previous studies carried out at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna have shown that L. monocytogenes is more prevalent in rural areas than in cities. But the situation in urban lavatories had so far not been investigated. [More]
Children likelier to drink sugar-sweetened beverages post parents' divorce

Children likelier to drink sugar-sweetened beverages post parents' divorce

Children of recently separated or divorced families are likelier to drink sugar-sweetened beverages than children in families where the parents are married, putting them at higher risk for obesity later in life, according to a new study from San Francisco State University. [More]
Kansas State researchers preparing for next potential influenza strain

Kansas State researchers preparing for next potential influenza strain

As seasonal influenza cases decrease across the United States, Kansas State University researchers are preparing for the next potential virulent strain of flu. [More]
Raising sale age for tobacco products to 21 may prevent adolescents from taking up smoking

Raising sale age for tobacco products to 21 may prevent adolescents from taking up smoking

Raising the minimum age to buy cigarettes to 21 would save lives by preventing adolescents from ever taking up smoking, a new report suggests. [More]
Common antidepressant medications not helpful for people with mood, anxiety disorders

Common antidepressant medications not helpful for people with mood, anxiety disorders

Studies indicate that the majority of people with mood and anxiety disorders who receive the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressant medications, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors or SSRI's, are not helped by these medications. SSRIs are designed to increase serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that is key to maintenance of mood. [More]
Screening tool can help identify nations' vulnerability to Ebola

Screening tool can help identify nations' vulnerability to Ebola

Public health experts can identify nations that are vulnerable to the occurrence and impact of future outbreaks of Ebola or other emergencies by using a screening tool that evaluates a nation's strengths across a wide range of measures such as political strength and health care capabilities, according to a new analysis from the RAND Corporation. [More]