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HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]
Suggestions for successful breast feeding from nurse midwifery program

Suggestions for successful breast feeding from nurse midwifery program

Most new moms know the benefits of breast feeding. For babies, it can lower the risk of developing asthma, diabetes, and leukemia. For moms, it reduces the risk of breast cancer. But many women still don't know where to turn for help when breast feeding doesn't go as smoothly as they imagined it would. [More]
Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for not vaccinating

Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for not vaccinating

Not all students returning to school this month will be up to date on their vaccinations. A new study conducted by Jennifer Reich, a researcher at the University of Colorado Denver, shows that the reasons why children may not be fully vaccinated depends on the class privilege of their mothers. [More]
Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration

Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration

Nocturnal awakenings are frequent among 6-month-old children, but sharing bed might make things worse. [More]
Contaminated blood cultures can serve as diagnostic predictor for more targeted antibiotics

Contaminated blood cultures can serve as diagnostic predictor for more targeted antibiotics

Some 30 percent of all positive hospital blood culture samples are discarded every day because they're "contaminated" - they reflect the presence of skin germs instead of specific disease-causing bacteria. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center redesignated as Level III Perinatal Center

Loyola University Medical Center redesignated as Level III Perinatal Center

Loyola University Medical Center has been redesignated as a Level III Perinatal Center by the Illinois Department of Public Health. [More]
Patients with intestinal polyps have lower risk of dying from cancer

Patients with intestinal polyps have lower risk of dying from cancer

Patients with intestinal polyps have a lower risk of dying from cancer than previously thought, according to Norwegian researchers. [More]
Report on Co-development Terms & Agreements in Pharma, Biotech and Diagnostics

Report on Co-development Terms & Agreements in Pharma, Biotech and Diagnostics

The Co-development Terms and Agreements in Pharma, Biotech and Diagnostics report provides comprehensive understanding and unprecedented access to the co-development deals and agreements entered into by the worlds leading life science companies. [More]
New evidence puts into doubt the long-held depression belief

New evidence puts into doubt the long-held depression belief

New evidence puts into doubt the long-standing belief that a deficiency in serotonin - a chemical messenger in the brain - plays a central role in depression. In the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, scientists report that mice lacking the ability to make serotonin in their brains (and thus should have been "depressed" by conventional wisdom) did not show depression-like symptoms. [More]
THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease

THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease

Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from neuroscientists at the University of South Florida shows. [More]
Experts call for action to prevent health risks associated with climate change

Experts call for action to prevent health risks associated with climate change

Previously unrecognized health benefits could be realized from fast action to reduce climate change and its consequences. For example, changes in energy and transport policies could save millions of lives annually from diseases caused by high levels of air pollution. The right energy and transport policies could also reduce the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity and traffic injury. [More]
Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could have large effects on coverage in Africa

Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could have large effects on coverage in Africa

Expanding the age of eligibility for measles vaccination from 12 to 15 months could have potentially large effects on coverage in Africa, according to a new report published by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. [More]
Study to clarify findings about domestic violence among pot-smoking couples

Study to clarify findings about domestic violence among pot-smoking couples

New research findings from a study of 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence. [More]
Auriculotherapy may help in managing chronic constipation

Auriculotherapy may help in managing chronic constipation

Nearly 1 in 6 adults worldwide may suffer from chronic constipation and, over time, the disorder can cause serious complications. Auriculotherapy, a form of acupuncture that involves stimulating targeted points on the outer ear, may help in managing constipation. [More]
Nursing homes can see improvements in quality of care with "culture change"

Nursing homes can see improvements in quality of care with "culture change"

If a nursing home makes an extensive investment in "culture change" it will see improvements in quality of care, according to a new study led by Brown University gerontology researchers. [More]
Research to understand how medical marijuana laws may influence overdose deaths

Research to understand how medical marijuana laws may influence overdose deaths

In states where it is legal to use medical marijuana to manage chronic pain and other conditions, the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25 percent lower than in states where medical marijuana remains illegal, new research suggests. [More]
Authors emphasize benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplements on bone health

Authors emphasize benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplements on bone health

Calcium and vitamin D are essential to keeping bones strong, dense and healthy as we age, as well as preventing bone loss, osteporosis, and skeletal fractures. [More]
Black carbon may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women

Black carbon may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women

Black carbon pollutants from wood smoke are known to trap heat near the earth's surface and warm the climate. A new study led by McGill Professor Jill Baumgartner suggests that black carbon may also increase women's risk of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Preadolescent youth who play violent video games are at greater risk for depression

Preadolescent youth who play violent video games are at greater risk for depression

Preadolescent youth who play violent video games for a significant amount of time each day are at greater risk for depression, according to research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) released Monday in Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking. [More]
LSU Health receives $700,000 grant to increase access to advanced nursing education

LSU Health receives $700,000 grant to increase access to advanced nursing education

The LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing was awarded a $700,000 Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship grant to increase access to advanced nursing education and patient care for disadvantaged, underserved and under-represented groups, as well as veterans. [More]