Public Health News and Research RSS Feed - Public Health News and Research

Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design

Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design

Previous studies have shown a correlation between the design of cities and growing epidemics of injuries and non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. [More]
FDA approves new biosimilar for multiple inflammatory diseases

FDA approves new biosimilar for multiple inflammatory diseases

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Amjevita (adalimumab-atto) as a biosimilar to Humira (adalimumab) for multiple inflammatory diseases. [More]
Researchers develop new analytical capabilities to identify chemical forms of mercury in human hair

Researchers develop new analytical capabilities to identify chemical forms of mercury in human hair

Mercury is a potent neurotoxin present in our daily lives and our body can accumulate it over the years. Food consumption, such as fish and rice, is the most common source of mercury exposure. [More]
CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

Using high-resolution electron microscopy, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have uncovered new details of the structure and function of an intracellular channel that controls the contraction of skeletal muscle. [More]
JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

Seventy-five percent of patients with moderate to severe alopecia areata—an autoimmune disease that causes patchy, and less frequently, total hair loss—had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib, reported researchers from Columbia University Medical Center. By the end of their treatment, average hair regrowth was 92 percent. [More]
Cesarean-section leaves women more vulnerable to VTE than vaginal delivery

Cesarean-section leaves women more vulnerable to VTE than vaginal delivery

Roughly one-third of all births in Europe and North America now occur via cesarean section (CS). Following any birth, women are at an increased risk for a venous thromboembolism (VTE), but it's believed that CS leaves women more vulnerable to VTE, blood clots, than vaginal delivery (VD). [More]
Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

The heart cannot regenerate muscle tissue after a heart attack has killed part of the muscle wall, and that dead tissue can strain surrounding muscle, leading to a lethal heart enlargement. [More]
New open access journal covers latest research on diseases affecting the head and neck areas

New open access journal covers latest research on diseases affecting the head and neck areas

The American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation is pleased to announce that OTO Open, the Academy's new and official open access journal will be joining the Academy's premier journal, Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, both published by SAGE Publishing. [More]
MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

Streptococcus pneumoniae likely is not a term immediately recognizable by most individuals, even if they have had unpleasant run-ins with the common bacterium. However, experts at Mississippi State University are pioneering pathways to new treatment options. [More]
Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional "heart patches" in a large animal model — the last big hurdle before trials in human patients. [More]
Experts receive $5.2 million NIH grant to develop affordable test for diagnosing Chagas disease

Experts receive $5.2 million NIH grant to develop affordable test for diagnosing Chagas disease

An international team of researchers led by infectious disease experts at the University of Georgia has received $5.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to develop a more accurate, affordable diagnostic test for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that kills more than 50,000 people each year in Central and South America. [More]
First case-control study examines link between microcephaly and in utero Zika virus infection

First case-control study examines link between microcephaly and in utero Zika virus infection

The relation between Zika virus and microcephaly is widely assumed to be causal because of strong evidence of an association. However, evidence so far comes from case reports, case series, modelling studies, and preliminary reports from cohort studies – none of which have included appropriate control groups. [More]
Training during first two weeks of menstrual cycle can have more effect on muscular strength

Training during first two weeks of menstrual cycle can have more effect on muscular strength

Research at Umeå University provides new insights into when during the menstrual cycle it is advantageous to periodise your strength training. [More]
New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

Chronic infection by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) proved fatal for over 700,000 people worldwide in 2013, mainly as a result of liver damage. Although information on the epidemiology of transmission and infection is sparse, recent estimates put the global prevalence of HCV infection at 130-150 million people. [More]
Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

A new study offers compelling evidence that a novel form of the dangerous superbug Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can spread to humans through consumption or handling of contaminated poultry. [More]
Study finds racial disparities in physical and functional quality of life for breast cancer survivors

Study finds racial disparities in physical and functional quality of life for breast cancer survivors

An analysis of the quality of life of several thousand breast cancer survivors in North Carolina found differences in how black and white women functioned and felt physically and spiritually during treatment and two years after diagnosis. [More]
Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may reduce levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
New network aims to tackle mental health needs of children in the EMR

New network aims to tackle mental health needs of children in the EMR

The University of Liverpool and the John Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore have been awarded a £1.9m grant from the US National Institute of Mental Health to lead a network to address child mental health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. [More]
Researchers discover gene variants linked to thoracic aortic dissections

Researchers discover gene variants linked to thoracic aortic dissections

On Super Bowl Sunday, Tina Wilkins was relaxing in her recliner while she chatted on the phone with her mother and waited for the game to begin. She had recently lost 63 pounds and was in better shape than she had been in years. [More]
Researchers reveal previously unknown role of glutamate in neuromuscular development

Researchers reveal previously unknown role of glutamate in neuromuscular development

For decades, scientists thought acetylcholine was the only neurotransmitter responsible for controlling how muscles and nerves are wired together during development. [More]
Advertisement