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Genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissues could offer clues to tumor behavior

Genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissues could offer clues to tumor behavior

Two recently discovered genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissue cells -- an altered gene and a snippet of noncoding genetic material -- could offer clues to tumor behavior and potential new targets for therapy, Johns Hopkins scientists report. [More]
New FDA-approved drug helps patients fight against late-stage lung cancer

New FDA-approved drug helps patients fight against late-stage lung cancer

A new drug has been approved by the FDA in the fight against lung cancer. Tecentriq is being used by patients like Cornelius Bresnan, who had late-stage cancer. [More]
Sperm tail enzymes inspire nanobiotechnology

Sperm tail enzymes inspire nanobiotechnology

Just like workers in a factory, enzymes can create a final product more efficiently if they are stuck together in one place and pass the raw material from enzyme to enzyme, assembly line-style. [More]
New treatment prevents chemotherapy-induced hearing loss in children with cancer

New treatment prevents chemotherapy-induced hearing loss in children with cancer

Investigators from Children's Hospital Los Angeles and 37 other Children's Oncology Group hospitals in the U.S. and Canada have determined that sodium thiosulfate prevents cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children and adolescents with cancer. [More]
Researchers show how microRNAs play key role in tumor progression and response to radiation

Researchers show how microRNAs play key role in tumor progression and response to radiation

OHSU researcher Sudarshan Anand, Ph.D., has a contemporary analogy to describe microRNA: "I sometimes compare MicroRNA to tweets -- they're short, transient and constantly changing." [More]
Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Microscopy's got a long history. It was developed about 350 years ago for scientists to visualize things they could discern, but not describe. The two pioneers of microscopy were Antoine van Leeuwenhoek, who developed the first microscope and soon after the renowned scientist, Robert Hooke. [More]
Reseachers identify cellular ‘off’ switch for inflammatory immune response in asthma attacks

Reseachers identify cellular ‘off’ switch for inflammatory immune response in asthma attacks

Working with human immune cells in the laboratory, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a critical cellular "off" switch for the inflammatory immune response that contributes to lung-constricting asthma attacks. [More]
UC San Diego scientists reveal surprising role for Hippo pathway in subduing tumor immunogenicity

UC San Diego scientists reveal surprising role for Hippo pathway in subduing tumor immunogenicity

Previous studies identified the Hippo pathway kinases LATS1/2 as a tumor suppressor, but new research led by University of California San Diego School of Medicine scientists reveals a surprising role for these enzymes in subduing cancer immunity. The findings, published in Cell on December 1, could have a clinical role in improving efficiency of immunotherapy drugs. [More]
Scientists discover unique genomic changes integral to testicular cancer development

Scientists discover unique genomic changes integral to testicular cancer development

Researchers led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute say they have identified unique genomic changes that may be integral to testicular cancer development and explain why the great majority are highly curable with chemotherapy - unlike most solid tumors. [More]
New device could revolutionize drug delivery to treat cancer and other diseases, study shows

New device could revolutionize drug delivery to treat cancer and other diseases, study shows

A new study by Lyle Hood, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio, describes a new device that could revolutionize the delivery of medicine to treat cancer as well as a host of other diseases and ailments. [More]
Treatment with biosimilar drug improves progression-free survival in breast cancer patients

Treatment with biosimilar drug improves progression-free survival in breast cancer patients

Among women with metastatic breast cancer, treatment with a drug that is biosimilar to the breast cancer drug trastuzumab resulted in an equivalent overall response rate at 24 weeks compared with trastuzumab, according to a study published online by JAMA. [More]
Researchers identify metabolite that promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells

Researchers identify metabolite that promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells

Osaka University researchers revealed that the metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread. [More]
Study identifies conditions required to further develop liver and pancreas cells

Study identifies conditions required to further develop liver and pancreas cells

AMSBIO reports on the recent publication in Nature Protocols1 by Dr Meritxell Huch** and co-workers which describes development of culture conditions that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from the liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D organoid cultures. [More]
Researchers uncover new prognostic marker and possible therapeutic target for Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers uncover new prognostic marker and possible therapeutic target for Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers of the Sarcoma research group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, have first described the methylation profile of Ewing's sarcoma, a cancer of bone and soft tissues that mainly affects children and teenagers. [More]
Novel imaging technique shows promise to detect, monitor and guide therapy for prostate cancer

Novel imaging technique shows promise to detect, monitor and guide therapy for prostate cancer

An international group of researchers report success in mice of a method of using positron emission tomography scans to track, in real time, an antibody targeting a hormone receptor pathway specifically involved in prostate cancer. [More]
Type 2 diabetes drug may someday help combat breast and ovarian cancers

Type 2 diabetes drug may someday help combat breast and ovarian cancers

A drug used now to treat Type 2 diabetes may someday help beat breast and ovarian cancers, but not until researchers decode the complex interactions that in some cases help promote tumors, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
Scientists identify cell-surface receptor for progranulin

Scientists identify cell-surface receptor for progranulin

Progranulin is produced and secreted by most cells in the body. From skin to immune cells, brain to bone marrow cells, progranulin plays a key role in maintaining normal cellular function. [More]
New optical fiber probe could help differentiate between healthy and cancerous tissue during surgery

New optical fiber probe could help differentiate between healthy and cancerous tissue during surgery

An optical fiber probe can distinguish cancer tissue and normal tissue at the margins of a tumor being excised, in real time, by detecting the difference in pH between the two types of tissue. [More]
New green nanotechnology approach targets, destroys precancerous tumor cells in livers of mice

New green nanotechnology approach targets, destroys precancerous tumor cells in livers of mice

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 700,000 new cases of liver cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year. [More]
Dirt beneath New York City may provide new weapons to fight against disease

Dirt beneath New York City may provide new weapons to fight against disease

Microbes have long been an invaluable source of new drugs. And to find more, we may have to look no further than the ground beneath our feet. [More]
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