Swedish launches series of initiatives to raise awareness about heart disease and stroke

Published on February 15, 2011 at 4:23 AM · No Comments

Swedish, the largest, most comprehensive non-profit health provider in the greater Seattle area, today announced its plans for American Heart Month, recognized in the month of February. American Heart Month is led by the American Heart Association to raise funds for research and education and to raise awareness about heart disease and stroke.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Every year about 785,000 Americans have a heart attack and another 470,000, who have already had one or more heart attacks, have another attack.

"Swedish is proud to participate in American Heart Month to bring attention to our nation's number one killer—cardiovascular disease," said Marcel Loh, chief administrative officer at Swedish's Cherry Hill campus. "The Swedish Heart and Vascular Institute is dedicated to research and treatment of cardiovascular disease, including stroke. We are urging our community to take a stand to reduce their risks of heart disease."

Swedish's Heart and Vascular Institute offers a full spectrum of heart and vascular services, from prevention to treatment and research. The Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute is affiliated with more than 60 cardiovascular specialists, including cardiologists, surgeons, radiologists, anesthesiologists and vascular specialists.

For American Heart Month, Swedish is taking a stand to educate the public by hosting several initiatives.

Source:

Swedish Medical Center

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