Technological breakthrough allows U-M Health System to reduce patients' radiation exposure

Published on January 20, 2012 at 9:21 AM · No Comments

A technological breakthrough is allowing the University of Michigan Health System to be the first teaching hospital in the U.S. to perform some CT scans using a fraction of the radiation dose required for a conventional CT image.

Over the past decade, U-M scientists have contributed to the research behind the new GE Healthcare technology, known as Veo.

"Reducing patients' radiation exposure is a high priority for us," says Ella Kazerooni, M.D., M.S., professor of radiology at the U-M Medical School. "The radiation dose for a standard chest CT is equal to about 70 chest x-rays. In comparison, a chest CT using Veo can use a radiation dose equivalent to just one or two chest x-rays."

Doses for scans using Veo, however, will vary depending on factors like the size of the patient, the part of the body being scanned, and the diagnostic task, Kazerooni notes.

Veo was installed on one CT scanner at U-M in late 2011 and the Health System plans to offer the technology more widely in the future. Veo is already in use in Europe, Canada and Asia.

CT, or computed tomography, uses X-rays to diagnose and monitor a variety of health conditions such as cancer, complex bone fractures, blood clots and clogged coronary arteries. The use of CT scans has increased in recent years, leading to concerns about increased lifetime radiation exposure, which may raise one's risk of developing cancer.

To a trained radiologist like Kazerooni, an image made using Veo looks slightly different than a conventional CT image.

"I might describe it as a little waxy looking," she says. "But the real question isn't whether the picture is as pretty, but whether we can see the things we need to see and get the critical information from an image using a much lower dose of radiation. And from what we've seen so far, the answer is, yes we can."

Doctors at U-M stress that Veo is just one component of ongoing efforts to minimize radiation exposure for all patients. Other approaches include using non-ionizing radiation methods like ultrasound and MRI whenever possible; employing protocols that tie radiation dose to a patient's size (smaller patients require less radiation); and carefully selecting and training CT technologists.

"We're very excited to be adding Veo to the measures we already have in place to ensure that we get the diagnostic images we need to treat our patients using the lowest amount of radiation possible," says N. Reed Dunnick, Fred Jenner Hodges Professor of Radiology at the U-M Medical School and chair of the Department of Radiology.

Initially, Veo will be available to a limited number of adult patients because the technology is equipped on only one scanner. U-M plans to offer Veo more widely as it upgrades the seven compatible CT systems at the new C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and University Hospital campus.

Most of the CT scanners at the University Hospital campus and satellite clinics already employ low-dose technologies and the Department of Radiology is pursuing ongoing efforts to keep radiation doses for all patients to a minimum.

Veo is not a new type of machine, but a new way of processing data, explains Jeff Fessler, Ph.D., a U-M professor in the departments of Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Radiology and Biomedical Engineering. Using a technique called Model-based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR), the technology employs sophisticated algorithms to squeeze more information out of the existing X-ray data.

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