Breast cancer in men rarer but more deadly than in women

Published on May 8, 2012 at 3:33 AM · No Comments

By Dr Ananya Mandal, MD

According to new research, breast cancer may be much less common than it is in women, but it may be more deadly.

Men with breast cancer don't do as well as women with breast cancer, and there are opportunities to improve that,” said study author Dr. Jon Greif, a breast surgeon in San Francisco. “They were less likely to get the standard treatments that women get.” Survival rates for men with breast cancer, overall, are lower than those for women, at least when it is diagnosed in the early stages, Greif found. The cancers differ in other respects too.

Greif was scheduled to present his findings Friday at the American Society of Breast Surgeons annual meeting in Phoenix. Greif and his team warn, however, that some of the differences they found may not bear out in clinical practice.

Although many men may not be aware that they can get breast cancer, nearly 2,200 new cases of male breast cancer are expected this year, according to the American Cancer Society. The society estimates 410 men will die of breast cancer in 2012 in the United States.

For his research Greif compared about 13,000 men with breast cancer, identified from the National Cancer Data Base, to more than 1.4 million women with breast cancer. The data covered 1998 to 2007. The investigators evaluated cancer characteristics and survival rates, taking into account age, ethnicity and other factors.

Men with breast cancer were more likely to be black than women with breast cancer (11.7 percent versus 9.9 percent) and less likely to be Hispanic (3.6 percent versus 4.5 percent), the researchers found. In addition, men were older at diagnosis -- 63, on average, compared to 59 for women.

Men's tumours were larger when diagnosed; they were more likely to have later-stage tumours, involvement of lymph nodes, spreading to other parts of the body and other differences. Men with breast cancer were less likely to get a partial mastectomy and to receive radiation, the study found. Greif also found that women's overall five-year survival rate was 83 percent, but men's was 74 percent. That was looking at all breast cancers, whatever the stage. When Greif's team looked at survival stage by stage, women with early stage cancer had better survival rates than men with early stage disease. The gap closed when men and women had more advanced disease.

A big limitation to the research: The database they drew from keeps track of which breast cancer patients die, but not what they died from. So it is impossible to tell if they died from their cancer or something else, he explained.

“Women are encouraged to get breast exams [and] mammograms,” Greif said. That is why their cancers are often diagnosed earlier, when the tumours are smaller, he said. More awareness of male breast cancer is crucial.

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