Nottingham experts identify risk factors associated with childhood obesity

Published on October 30, 2012 at 1:14 AM · No Comments

High birth weight, rapid weight gain and having an overweight mother who smokes can all increase the risk of a baby becoming obese later in childhood, research by experts at The University of Nottingham has found.

The study, published in the latest edition of the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, also discovered that children who were breastfed and were introduced to solid food later had a slightly reduced chance of becoming overweight.

The findings come following a systematic review and analysis of data from around 30 previous studies looking at the impact of factors affecting babies during the first 12 months of their lives and their potential link with childhood obesity.

The study was undertaken by PhD student Stephen Weng, supported by a team led by Dr Sarah Redsell in the University's School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. The team also included Professor Cris Glazebrook and Professor Min Yang of the Institute of Mental Health, and Dr Judy Swift, School of Biosciences. The study was funded by NHS Nottinghamshire County PCT

The first study of its kind to review all the evidence for risk factors in infancy associated with childhood obesity, it is hoped the findings will help to bridge the gap between research and the implementation of new clinical practice.

Dr Redsell said: "The results of this study effectively identify the most significant risk factors by analysing data from a large number of other studies that have previously been conducted. This will offer a robust starting point for further research that will identify the most appropriate ways in which this information could be useful in healthcare practice."

In the UK around one-quarter of children aged four to five years old and one-third of 10 to 11-year-olds are overweight and evidence suggests that children who are overweight at the age of five are more likely to be obese in adulthood.

Up to now, support from GPs and health visitors has centred on advice on healthy eating and breastfeeding but many practitioners believe more should be done to identify infants who are at risk of becoming obese at an earlier age.

The analysis of previous studies showed that:

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