ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital verified as Level II Pediatric Trauma Center

Published on August 16, 2014 at 2:06 PM · No Comments

The American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma has verified ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital as a Level II Pediatric Trauma Center. This achievement recognizes Toledo Children's Hospital's dedication to providing the highest quality of trauma care for injured children and makes it the only verified pediatric trauma center in northwest Ohio.

In 2013, there were 26,159 visits to the Toledo Children's Hospital Emergency Center. Of those visits, 1,487 were injured related and 488 were significant traumas.

"As a Level II Pediatric Trauma Center, we are equipped to provide a high level of care for injured children in northwest Ohio," said Scott Langenburg, MD, trauma medical director at Toledo Children's Hospital.

Verified trauma centers must meet specific American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma criteria that ensures trauma care capability and institutional performance. Participants provide not only the hospital resources necessary for trauma care but also the entire spectrum of care to address the needs of all injured patients. This starts as preventive measures with community outreach and continues through the rehabilitation process.

"It is extremely important to ensure that experts are on hand to see the case through from beginning to end to guarantee that each patient receives the very best care," said Rochelle Armola, MSN, RN, CCRN, trauma services director, ProMedica Toledo and Toledo Children's Hospitals. "We are committed to our patients and the families we serve."

The multidisciplinary trauma team at Toledo Children's Hospital includes surgeons, neurosurgeons, orthopaedic surgeons, plastic surgeons, anesthesiologists and critical care doctors as well as other doctors, nurses and staff trained to work with critically injured children.

Source:

ProMedica

Posted in: Child Health News | Healthcare News

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