UC scientists use artificial intelligence to accurately predict treatment outcomes for bipolar disorder
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  June 12, 2017  
  Bipolar Disorder  
  The latest bipolar disorder news from News Medical  
 UC scientists use artificial intelligence to accurately predict treatment outcomes for bipolar disorderUC scientists use artificial intelligence to accurately predict treatment outcomes for bipolar disorder
 
The artificial intelligence that can blow human pilots out of the sky in air-to-air combat accurately predicted treatment outcomes for bipolar disorder, according to a new medical study by the University of Cincinnati.
 
 
 Online self-management program benefits parents with bipolar disorderOnline self-management program benefits parents with bipolar disorder
 
Online self-management support for parents with Bipolar Disorder leads to improvements in parenting and child behavior.
 
   Novel app that predicts manic, depressive episodes in people with bipolar disorder wins grand prizeNovel app that predicts manic, depressive episodes in people with bipolar disorder wins grand prize
 
A team led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, along with collaborators at the University of Michigan and Sage Bionetworks, has won the Mood Challenge for ResearchKit, a contest that called on researchers to come up with new ways to study mood disorders using Apple's ResearchKit, an open-source platform for creating iOS apps.
 
   Nearly half of adults with mood disorders experience chronic pain, survey findsNearly half of adults with mood disorders experience chronic pain, survey finds
 
In a survey of adults with anxiety or a mood disorder like depression or bipolar disorder, about half reported experiencing chronic pain, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.
 
 Scientists identify key gene in 22q11.2 that contributes to genitourinary birth defects
 
Scientists identify key gene in 22q11.2 that contributes to genitourinary birth defectsThe 22q11.2 region of human chromosome 22 is a hotspot for a variety of birth defects. Scientists learned about this region because it is deleted in about 1 in 4,000 births, causing the loss or duplication of up to 40 genes.