Individuals who follow healthy lifestyle less likely to have colorectal cancer risk, survey finds
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  May 17, 2017  
  Bowel Cancer  
  The latest bowel cancer news from News Medical  
 Individuals who follow healthy lifestyle less likely to have colorectal cancer risk, survey findsIndividuals who follow healthy lifestyle less likely to have colorectal cancer risk, survey finds
 
A Cleveland Clinic colon cancer risk assessment survey found that respondents who exercised more followed a healthy diet and did not smoke were less likely to have a personal history of colorectal cancer or colon polyps.
 
 
 Researchers identify new strategy that doubles screening rates for colorectal cancerResearchers identify new strategy that doubles screening rates for colorectal cancer
 
University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have identified a strategy that doubled screening rates for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, among patient groups who historically have had lower rates.
 
   Advanced endoscope to enable rapid, accurate diagnosis of early colon cancerAdvanced endoscope to enable rapid, accurate diagnosis of early colon cancer
 
Minimally invasive endoscope using breakthrough photonics technology to enable rapid, accurate diagnosis of bowel polyps and early colon cancer.
 
   Study reveals role of good-guy protein in initiating and maintaining cancerStudy reveals role of good-guy protein in initiating and maintaining cancer
 
Under normal conditions, the CHD4 protein is one of the good guys: it stops cells from transcribing faulty DNA, thereby eliminating potential mutation. But in colon cancer and perhaps other kinds of cancer as well, it appears that this protein becomes a kind of double agent, working for the enemy.
 
   New research uncovers role of mysterious molecule in skin cancerNew research uncovers role of mysterious molecule in skin cancer
 
New research from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) at Lake Nona uncovers the modus operandi of a mysterious molecule called SPRIGHTLY that has been previously implicated in colorectal cancer, breast cancer, and melanoma.
 
 What Can Cause Blood in Poo? (Stool)
 
What Can Cause Blood in Poo? (Stool)Blood in the stool may be noticed after a bowel movement or following a test arranged by a doctor. It denotes the presence of bleeding somewhere within the gastrointestinal tract, comprising the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and anus.
 
 
 Short-Chain Fatty Acids (SCFAs) and Immune Regulation
 
Short-Chain Fatty Acids (SCFAs) and Immune RegulationButyrate and propionate are two important short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced in the human gut. They have been shown to have significant immune system effects in the intestinal mucosa, by inducing the differentiation of T-regulatory cells via inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC). This enzyme keeps chromatin from unwinding and, therefore, inhibits gene transcription.
 
 
 Study finds worse survival rates for heart failure despite advances in treatment
 
Study finds worse survival rates for heart failure despite advances in treatmentA new analysis finds that, despite advances in care, men and women with a diagnosis of heart failure continue to have worse survival rates than patients with certain common cancers.
 
 
 Scientists identify RIOK1 enzyme as new target for cancer therapy
 
Scientists identify RIOK1 enzyme as new target for cancer therapyDr. Florian Weinberg, from Prof. Dr. Tilman Brummer's research group at the Institute of Molecular Medicine and Cell Research of the University of Freiburg, joined forces with scientists from the Departments of Clinical Pathology and Medicine I of the University Medical Centre Freiburg and the Kinghorn Cancer Centre/Garvan Insitute in Australia in an international team that has identified a new target for cancer therapy.
 
 
 Cancer screening for transplant patients do not meet existing guidelines, new study finds
 
Cancer screening for transplant patients do not meet existing guidelines, new study findsPeople who have received organ transplants are at higher risk of developing and dying of cancer than the general population. Yet their rates of cancer screening do not meet existing guidelines, a new study has found.
 
 
 Research illuminates how primary colorectal tumors contribute to premetastatic 'niche' formation
 
Research illuminates how primary colorectal tumors contribute to premetastatic 'niche' formationPrimary colorectal tumors secrete VEGF-A, inducing CXCL1 and CXCR2-positive myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment at distant sites and establishing niches for future metastases, report Medical University of South Carolina investigators in an article published online ahead of print on April 28, 2017 by Cancer Research.
 
 
 Immunoreceptor promotes tumor growth in mouse models of liver cancer driven by inflammation
 
Immunoreceptor promotes tumor growth in mouse models of liver cancer driven by inflammationBoosting a part of the immune system known to have anti-tumor properties may actually help tumors grow in cancers linked to chronic inflammation.
 
 
 TSRI scientists uncover regulatory machinery underlying the function of cancer protein
 
TSRI scientists uncover regulatory machinery underlying the function of cancer proteinDespite intense research, there's been much confusion regarding the exact role of a protein in a critical cancer-linked pathway. On one hand, the protein is described as a cell proliferation inhibitor, on the other, a cell proliferation activator, a duality that has caused a great deal of scientific head scratching.