New, highly-detailed hay fever map of Britain may help allergy sufferers avoid hotspots
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  May 22, 2017  
  Allergy  
  The latest Allergy news from News Medical  
 New, highly-detailed hay fever map of Britain may help allergy sufferers avoid hotspotsNew, highly-detailed hay fever map of Britain may help allergy sufferers avoid hotspots
 
A hay fever map of Britain - with the first ever guide to the location of plants in the UK that can trigger the allergy - has been produced to help sufferers cope, and warn them which 'hotspots' to avoid.
 
 
 Major allergens strongly underrepresented in some immunotherapy against bee stingsMajor allergens strongly underrepresented in some immunotherapy against bee stings
 
Summer is approaching, and for many allergy sufferers this means it is time to start fearing bee stings. "Allergic reactions to insect venoms are potentially life-threatening, and constitute one of the most severe hypersensitivity reactions," explains PD Dr. Simon Blank, research group leader at the Center of Allergy & Environment, a joint undertaking by the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the TUM.
 
   Researchers identify antibodies that hold promise as Ebola treatmentsResearchers identify antibodies that hold promise as Ebola treatments
 
The fight to contain the 2013-16 Ebola outbreak in West Africa was hampered by the lack of an effective treatment or vaccine.
 
   Complex malaria vaccine protects monkeys against virulent parasite strainsComplex malaria vaccine protects monkeys against virulent parasite strains
 
Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite.
 
   Researchers show how diesel fumes could potentially worsen underlying respiratory conditionsResearchers show how diesel fumes could potentially worsen underlying respiratory conditions
 
Scientists have shown how diesel fumes trigger respiratory reflexes which could potentially worsen underlying conditions, such as asthma.
 
 False Alarm Hypothesis of Food Allergy
 
False Alarm Hypothesis of Food AllergyFood allergies are an increasing trend over the past three decades or so, uniquely in countries on a Westernized diet. Current food allergy theories do not account for this rise, however the false alarm hypothesis links the Westernized diet to food allergies.
 
 
 Scientists shed light on evolutionary history of multidrug-resistant enterococci bacteria
 
Scientists shed light on evolutionary history of multidrug-resistant enterococci bacteriaEnterococci bacteria are the bane of hospitals, causing thousands of multidrug-resistant infections in patients each year.
 
 
 FDA-approved drug improves clinical outcomes among patients with rare immunologic disease
 
FDA-approved drug improves clinical outcomes among patients with rare immunologic diseaseAdding the injectable drug mepolizumab to standard treatment for eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), a rare immunologic disease, significantly improved clinical outcomes among participants in an advanced clinical trial, scientists report.
 
 
 Conductive Hearing Loss
 
Conductive Hearing LossSound waves pass from the ear canal in the outer ear to the middle ear, and create a vibration of the eardrum. Due to the vibrations of the tiny bones in the middle ear, we are able to hear sound. When there is a lack of vibration, it affects hearing and we term this condition as conductive hearing loss. There will be a reduction in the sound levels and the patient may not be able to hear faint founds.
 
 
 Lung microbiome
 
Lung microbiomeOver the past decade, culture-independent microbial investigation techniques have led to an improved understanding of the complete set of microbes that live on and within the human body. This set of human-associated microbes is collectively known as the microbiome.
 
 
 Scientists create graphene-based sensor to predict onset of asthma attacks
 
Scientists create graphene-based sensor to predict onset of asthma attacksRutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have created a graphene-based sensor that could lead to earlier detection of looming asthma attacks and improve the management of asthma and other respiratory diseases, preventing hospitalizations and deaths.