Sangamo Therapeutics and Pfizer team up for development of Hemophilia A gene therapy
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  May 16, 2017  
  Hematology  
  The latest hematology news from News Medical  
 Sangamo Therapeutics and Pfizer team up for development of Hemophilia A gene therapySangamo Therapeutics and Pfizer team up for development of Hemophilia A gene therapy
 
Sangamo Therapeutics, Inc. and Pfizer Inc. today announced an exclusive, global collaboration and license agreement for the development and commercialization of gene therapy programs for Hemophilia A, including SB-525, one of Sangamo's four lead product candidates, which Sangamo expects will enter the clinic this quarter.
 
 
 New trial aims to prolong remission for pediatric leukemia patients treated with T-cell immunotherapyNew trial aims to prolong remission for pediatric leukemia patients treated with T-cell immunotherapy
 
After phase 1 results of Seattle Children's Pediatric Leukemia Adoptive Therapy trial have shown T-cell immunotherapy to be effective in getting 93 percent of patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia into complete initial remission, researchers have now opened a first-in-human clinical trial aimed at reducing the rate of relapse after the therapy, which is about 50 percent.
 
   Researchers develop new test that predicts need for massive blood transfusion in trauma patientsResearchers develop new test that predicts need for massive blood transfusion in trauma patients
 
By combining a conventional laboratory measurement of blood clotting time (known as the International Normalized Ratio or INR) with a new test of blood clot strength, based upon thrombelastography (TEG), researchers at the University of Colorado's Department of Surgery, Denver, are able to quickly and efficiently assess the overall ability of blood to clot and identify trauma patients who were most in need of a massive blood transfusion.
 
   UT Health scientists discover epigenetic changes that contribute to AMLUT Health scientists discover epigenetic changes that contribute to AML
 
UT Health San Antonio researchers discovered epigenetic changes that contribute to one-fifth of cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive cancer that arises out of the blood-forming cells in bone marrow.
 
   Enlarged Spleen (Splenomegaly)Enlarged Spleen (Splenomegaly)
 
The spleen is an intra-abdominal organ located just below the left side of the ribcage, behind the stomach. It is involved in removing abnormal or worn-out red cells from the blood, and also contributes to the immune function of the body, by providing antibodies and lymphocytes.
 
 Causes of Spleen Pain
 
Causes of Spleen PainThe spleen is an organ situated behind the stomach, in the upper left part of the abdomen known as the left hypochondrium. It is located under the ribcage and therefore is not usually felt by the palpating finger. However, in abnormal conditions it may give rise to pain felt as an aching sensation deep behind the left ribcage. This area may also hurt when it is touched. This could signal splenic damage, splenic rupture, or splenomegaly.
 
 
 Living Without a Spleen
 
Living Without a SpleenAsplenia, or the absence of a spleen, may be the result of functional or anatomical deficiency in spleen function.
 
 
 New study reveals impact of race, gender and socioeconomic status on PCI outcomes
 
New study reveals impact of race, gender and socioeconomic status on PCI outcomesA first-of-its-kind study discovered that women and minorities who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are at a greater risk of experiencing recurrent cardiac events within the first year after their procedure compared to Caucasian men.
 
 
 Study finds no clear benefit of stem-cell transplant for double-hit lymphoma patients in remission
 
Study finds no clear benefit of stem-cell transplant for double-hit lymphoma patients in remissionPatients with double hit lymphoma (DHL) who undergo autologous stem-cell transplantation (autoSCT) after achieving remission are not more likely to remain in remission or live longer than patients who do not undergo autoSCT, according to a new analysis from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.
 
 
 UC researchers find stem cell vaccine to enhance immune responses against tumors in animal models
 
UC researchers find stem cell vaccine to enhance immune responses against tumors in animal modelsResearchers at the University of Cincinnati have found that a cancer stem cell vaccine, engineered to express a pro-inflammatory protein called interleukin-15 (IL-15) and its receptor (IL-15Ralpha), caused T cell production in animal models and enhanced immune responses against tumors.
 
 
 Phase 1 trial shows safety and tolerability of oncolytic HSV-1 for children, young adults with cancer
 
Phase 1 trial shows safety and tolerability of oncolytic HSV-1 for children, young adults with cancerHSV1716 – an oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 – has been studied in adults via injection into the brain and superficial tumors.
 
 
 Scientists reveal how immune cells activate to kill parasitic worms
 
Scientists reveal how immune cells activate to kill parasitic wormsAn international team of researchers including Zissis C. Chroneos, associate professor of pediatrics, and microbiology and immunology at Penn State College of Medicine, reveals how immune cells called macrophages activate to kill parasitic worms.
 
 
 New spherical nucleic acid drug crosses blood-brain barrier to target brain tumors in animals
 
New spherical nucleic acid drug crosses blood-brain barrier to target brain tumors in animalsThe first drug using spherical nucleic acids to be systemically given to humans has been developed by Northwestern University scientists and approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an investigational new drug for an early-stage clinical trial in the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme.
 
 
 Study findings could pave way for better drugs to fight against parasitic infections
 
Study findings could pave way for better drugs to fight against parasitic infectionsImmune cells, called macrophages, may rely on a compound to signal an attack to beat back attacks from parasitic worms, according to an international team of researchers, including Zissis C. Chroneos, associate professor of pediatrics, and microbiology and immunology at Penn State College of Medicine.
 
 
 How is an Enlarged Spleen Diagnosed?
 
How is an Enlarged Spleen Diagnosed?The normal spleen is usually not palpable but is tucked beneath and above the left costal margin, between the fundus of the stomach and the diaphragm, with its long axis parallel to and running along the course of the tenth rib. When it enlarges, its lower border moves downwards and medially towards the middle of the anterior margin of the left ribcage.
 
 
 Early intervention provides survival benefit for NSTEMI patients
 
Early intervention provides survival benefit for NSTEMI patientsAn analysis of NSTEMI patients who undergo coronary revascularization within 24 hours of hospitalization showed an increased reduction in mortality, marking the first time this difference has been demonstrated.
 
 
 New organoid ‘fusion’ technique helps observe complex interactions between diverse brain regions
 
New organoid ‘fusion’ technique helps observe complex interactions between diverse brain regionsIn 2013 researchers led by IMBA scientist Jürgen Knoblich flabbergasted the scientific community. Starting from human stem cells, researchers in his lab managed to grow living three dimensional models of basic units of human brain in a dish.
 
 
 Research illuminates how primary colorectal tumors contribute to premetastatic 'niche' formation
 
Research illuminates how primary colorectal tumors contribute to premetastatic 'niche' formationPrimary colorectal tumors secrete VEGF-A, inducing CXCL1 and CXCR2-positive myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment at distant sites and establishing niches for future metastases, report Medical University of South Carolina investigators in an article published online ahead of print on April 28, 2017 by Cancer Research.