New analysis finds low adherence to IAEA quality metrics across nuclear cardiology laboratories
Can't see this email? View it online
   
  May 16, 2017  
  Cardiology  
  The latest cardiology news from News Medical  
 New analysis finds low adherence to IAEA quality metrics across nuclear cardiology laboratoriesNew analysis finds low adherence to IAEA quality metrics across nuclear cardiology laboratories
 
A study in 65 countries has revealed low adoption of International Atomic Energy Agency recommendations to reduce nuclear cardiology radiation exposure.
 
 
 New seminar by CRF aims to provide patients and caregivers deeper understanding of heart failureNew seminar by CRF aims to provide patients and caregivers deeper understanding of heart failure
 
The Cardiovascular Research Foundation will hold a free seminar, "Broken Hearts: Living with Heart Failure," on Tuesday, June 6, 2017 for heart failure patients and caregivers at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.
 
   Study explores use of beetroot juice as targeted treatment option for people with heart diseaseStudy explores use of beetroot juice as targeted treatment option for people with heart disease
 
A new study finds that dietary nitrate- a compound that dilates blood vessels to decrease blood pressure- may reduce overstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system that occurs with heart disease.
 
   Functional electrical stimulation helps MS and stroke patients to walk effectivelyFunctional electrical stimulation helps MS and stroke patients to walk effectively
 
Robert Bush has multiple sclerosis (MS), which sapped his ability to walk five years ago. Joseph McGlynn suffered a stroke that seriously impaired his left side, also five years ago.
 
   Elevated levels of specific protein linked to increased risk of ischemic stroke among womenElevated levels of specific protein linked to increased risk of ischemic stroke among women
 
Women with elevated levels of a protein in their blood may be at a higher risk of ischemic stroke, according to a study published in the May 10, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
 
 Regular use of common painkillers increases risk of heart attack, study reports
 
Regular use of common painkillers increases risk of heart attack, study reportsA study published in the British Medical Journal suggests that when people use commonly prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for treating pain and inflammation, the risk of heart attack increases as early as in the first week of consumption and particularly within the first month of using such medication in high doses.
 
 
 Study shows link between susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia and exertional heat stroke
 
Study shows link between susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia and exertional heat strokeNew research published online in The FASEB Journal may ultimately help athletes and trainers better understand who may be more at risk for heat stroke.
 
 
 People with severe mental illness have higher risk for cardiovascular disease, study reveals
 
People with severe mental illness have higher risk for cardiovascular disease, study revealsAn international study of more than 3.2 million people with severe mental illness reveals a substantially increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease compared to the general population.
 
 
 Study finds high and growing prevalence of women with heart disease delivering babies
 
Study finds high and growing prevalence of women with heart disease delivering babiesA study of more than 80,000 women with heart disease from 2003 to 2012 reveals that the prevalence of women with heart disease delivering babies increased by 24 percent over that 10-year period.
 
 
 Long-term aspirin therapy shows no benefit for stroke reduction in low risk AF patients, study finds
 
Long-term aspirin therapy shows no benefit for stroke reduction in low risk AF patients, study findsA new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found that using long-term aspirin therapy to prevent strokes among patients who are considered to be at low risk for stroke may not be effective as previously thought.
 
 
 New analysis examines link beween sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk in young children
 
New analysis examines link beween sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk in young childrenHow many hours a day young children (1-3 years) sleep does not appear to affect their cardiometabolic risk (CMR) at ages 3-8, based on an assessment of factors including blood pressure and cholesterol and blood glucose levels.
 
 
 New clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of stem cell product in patients disabled with chronic stroke
 
New clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of stem cell product in patients disabled with chronic strokeA clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a stem cell product injected directly into the brain to treat chronic motor deficits from ischemic stroke has begun at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.
 
 
 Intento's system allows patient to take the lead in stroke rehabilitation
 
Intento's system allows patient to take the lead in stroke rehabilitationEvery year, 17 million people worldwide suffer strokes, and a third are left paralyzed on one side of their body. But current rehabilitation solutions are not always effective in improving mobility declines after the first few months.
 
 
 Astronauts' exercise capacity goes down during spaceflight due to decreased blood vessel function
 
Astronauts' exercise capacity goes down during spaceflight due to decreased blood vessel functionAstronauts aboard the International Space Station have decreased physical fitness because of a decrease in the way oxygen moves through the body, according to a Kansas State University kinesiology study.
 
 
 Troponin elevations can occur in the absence of classic myocardial infarction, study shows
 
Troponin elevations can occur in the absence of classic myocardial infarction, study showsElevated cardiac troponin, a diagnostic marker of damage to the heart, may occur even if a patient has not had a heart attack, according to a study published in JACC: Basic to Translational Science.
 
 
 Full-fat dairy not bad for the heart, study finds
 
Full-fat dairy not bad for the heart, study findsA diet that includes full-fat dairy products does not increase the risk of heart disease, say researchers. The finding comes from a meta-analysis of 29 previous studies looking at whether dairy products increase the risk of death from any cause, including heart problems and cardiovascular disease.
 
 
 Gut microbiome may play key role in pathology of common cerebrovascular disease
 
Gut microbiome may play key role in pathology of common cerebrovascular diseaseBacteria in the gut microbiome drive the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), clusters of dilated, thin-walled blood vessels in the brain that can cause stroke and seizures, according to new research published this week in Nature by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
 
 Epidemiology of Hemorrhoids
 
Epidemiology of HemorrhoidsAlso known as a pile, a hemorrhoid is a swelling in the anal canal or around the anus with an enlarged blood vessel inside it. When tissue in these areas becomes swollen, possibly due to constipation and straining too much during a bowel movement, a hemorrhoid can develop. If the hemorrhoid becomes damaged, this can lead to pain and bleeding. Heavy lifting and other strenuous activities can also result in hemorrhoids.
 
 
 Penn researchers find AF ablation to be safe and effective for CHD patients
 
Penn researchers find AF ablation to be safe and effective for CHD patientsCongenital heart disease (CHD) includes a range of defects that occur in the heart which patients are born with, such as a hole in the heart's wall, a leaky valve or even an inversion in the heart's orientation. CHD was once a severe condition often resulting in early death, but now, more and more CHD patients are living long and healthy lives.
 
 
 UAH researcher develops new suite of phone apps to monitor physical mobility, stability of older people
 
UAH researcher develops new suite of phone apps to monitor physical mobility, stability of older peopleA new suite of phone apps developed at The University of Alabama in Huntsville uses Android smartphones to monitor the physical mobility and stability of older people.