Over-the-counter NSAIDs linked to elevated risk of cardiac arrest, study finds
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  March 21, 2017  
  Cardiology  
  The latest cardiology news from News Medical  
 Over-the-counter NSAIDs linked to elevated risk of cardiac arrest, study findsOver-the-counter NSAIDs linked to elevated risk of cardiac arrest, study finds
 
Painkillers considered harmless by the general public are associated with increased risk of cardiac arrest, according to research published today in the March issue of European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy.
 
 
 Continuation of statins may improve survival following heart surgery, research showsContinuation of statins may improve survival following heart surgery, research shows
 
Patients on statins should not stop taking the cholesterol-lowering medication before heart surgery—even on the day of surgery, according to an article posted online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
 
   Immune cells could be new target to treat type 2 diabetes, hypertension in overweight peopleImmune cells could be new target to treat type 2 diabetes, hypertension in overweight people
 
Immune cells which are reduced in number by obesity could be a new target to treat diseases such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension that affect overweight people, according to a collaborative study between The University of Manchester, Lund University and the University of Salford.
 
   Moderate exercise may benefit patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathyModerate exercise may benefit patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
 
As one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in young people, a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can push patients into sedentary lifestyles.
 
   Treating clogged arteries after heart attack improves outcomes, helps avoid subsequent proceduresTreating clogged arteries after heart attack improves outcomes, helps avoid subsequent procedures
 
Patients experiencing a major heart attack often have more than one clogged artery, but under current guidelines doctors typically only clear the blockage responsible for the heart attack.
 
 Blood test can identify patients with heart injury after non-cardiac surgery
 
Blood test can identify patients with heart injury after non-cardiac surgeryA blood test for a protein called high-sensitivity troponin T, which is released into the bloodstream when injury to the heart occurs, can identify patients with heart damage after non-cardiac surgery whose lives could potentially be saved with timely treatment, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
 
 
 Closing left atrial appendage linked to reduction in stroke risk for AFib patients
 
Closing left atrial appendage linked to reduction in stroke risk for AFib patientsFor patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib), a common heart rhythm disorder, closing the area of the heart known as the left atrial appendage as an add-on procedure during cardiac surgery was associated with a 40 percent reduction in the risk of thromboembolism (a condition when a blood clot forms and blocks an artery, which can cause a stroke or other complications) according to an observational study presented at the American College of...
 
 
 Early treatment with stem cells can safely help recovery in stroke patients, study shows
 
Early treatment with stem cells can safely help recovery in stroke patients, study showsA multicenter trial looking at whether a single dose of millions of adult, bone-marrow-derived stem cells can aid stroke recovery indicates it's safe and well-tolerated by patients but may not significantly improve their recovery within the first three months, researchers report.
 
 
 Low dose of alternative anticoagulant may help prevent stroke in hemodialysis patients
 
Low dose of alternative anticoagulant may help prevent stroke in hemodialysis patientsNew research suggests that an alternative to warfarin, when given at a low dose to dialysis patients, can be maintained in the blood at safe levels for potentially preventing strokes.
 
 
 New iFR technique for assessing clogged arteries reduces discomfort and adverse events
 
New iFR technique for assessing clogged arteries reduces discomfort and adverse eventsFor patients experiencing angina (chest pain) or a heart attack, a new tool called instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) was equivalent to the currently-preferred tool, fractional flow reserve (FFR), in terms of incidence of major adverse events according to two studies presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
 
 
 Modern guidelines may miss some African-Americans eligible for statin therapy
 
Modern guidelines may miss some African-Americans eligible for statin therapyAfrican Americans experience a disproportionately high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin treatment can be an important tool to lower the risk of plaque building up in the arteries.
 
 
 Novel synthetic HDL-C injection shows no benefit on arterial plaques
 
Novel synthetic HDL-C injection shows no benefit on arterial plaquesInjection of a novel form of synthetic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or good cholesterol, into the arteries of patients who had recently had a heart attack did not reduce the volume of fatty deposits, or plaque, in the arteries, compared with placebo injections, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
 
 
 Northumbria University uses G:BOX Chemi XX6 multi-application imager in biomedical research
 
Northumbria University uses G:BOX Chemi XX6 multi-application imager in biomedical researchSyngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis solutions, today announced its G:BOX Chemi XX6 is being used by scientists at Northumbria University for imaging chemiluminescent enzymes and other proteins on Western blots. This is contributing to rapidly providing researchers with accurate information on changes in protein in chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer.
 
 
 New class of cholesterol-lowering drug alongside statins can reduce risk of cardiovascular diseases
 
New class of cholesterol-lowering drug alongside statins can reduce risk of cardiovascular diseasesA new class of cholesterol-lowering drug has been found to help patients cut their risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke and heart attack.
 
 
 High levels of two biomarkers can predict risk for adverse cardiac events, research suggests
 
High levels of two biomarkers can predict risk for adverse cardiac events, research suggestsNew research suggests that GlycA, a newly identified blood marker, and C-reactive protein both independently predict major adverse cardiac events, including heart failure and death. Patients who have high levels of both biomarkers are at especially high risk.
 
 
 Low-risk atrial fibrillation patients fare better without antithrombotic therapy, study finds
 
Low-risk atrial fibrillation patients fare better without antithrombotic therapy, study findsFindings from a large, community-based study show that antithrombotic therapy doesn't decrease low-risk atrial fibrillation patients' risk of suffering a stroke within five years. In fact, researchers found that low-risk patients fared better without any antithrombotic therapy.
 
 
 Study shows how immune cells drive heart damage in mice
 
Study shows how immune cells drive heart damage in miceA new study in mice reveals that eosinophils, a type of disease-fighting white blood cell, appear to be at least partly responsible for the progression of heart muscle inflammation to heart failure in mice.
 
 
 Increased uric acid levels in early life may lead to high blood pressure later on
 
Increased uric acid levels in early life may lead to high blood pressure later onA new article published in the American Journal of Hypertension finds that very young children with increased uric acid levels had higher blood pressure at 3 years of age.
 
 
 Scientists to examine how stem cells proliferate faster in microgravity without side effects
 
Scientists to examine how stem cells proliferate faster in microgravity without side effectsGrowing significant numbers of human stem cells in a short time could lead to new treatments for stroke and other diseases. Scientists are sending stem cells to the International Space Station to test whether these cells proliferate faster in microgravity without suffering any side effects.
 
 
 Uninterrupted use of new anticoagulant reduces major bleeding events during atrial fibrillation ablation
 
Uninterrupted use of new anticoagulant reduces major bleeding events during atrial fibrillation ablationUninterrupted treatment with dabigatran, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOACs), before, during and after ablation to treat atrial fibrillation significantly reduced the incidence of major bleeding events compared with uninterrupted use of the more established anticoagulant warfarin, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
 
 
 CT scans reveal subclinical leaflet thrombosis in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement
 
CT scans reveal subclinical leaflet thrombosis in patients undergoing aortic valve replacementAbout 12 percent of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement developed non-symptomatic blood clots around the valve leaflets (known as subclinical leaflet thrombosis) that reduced the motion of the valves, according to an observational study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
 
 
 Study reveals link between endovascular procedures and microbleeding in the brain
 
Study reveals link between endovascular procedures and microbleeding in the brainSmall leakages from blood vessels in the brain, known as microbleeds, increase with age and are associated with cognitive decline. Of 84 older patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), nearly a quarter developed new microbleeds after their procedure, according to results of a single-center study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
 
 
 Pacing program can lead to seven-fold reduction in fainting episodes
 
Pacing program can lead to seven-fold reduction in fainting episodesPatients with recurrent fainting episodes (syncope) who received a pacemaker delivering a pacing program designed to detect and stop the abnormal heart rhythms that precede syncope had a seven-fold reduction in fainting compared with patients in a placebo pacing group, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
 
 
 New gene-silencing drugs cut cholesterol levels by half in early research
 
New gene-silencing drugs cut cholesterol levels by half in early researchThe first in a new class of gene-silencing drugs, known as inclisiran, has been shown to halve cholesterol levels in patients at risk of cardiovascular disease.
 
 
 Tsimane indigenous South Americans have lowest prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis of any population yet studied
 
Tsimane indigenous South Americans have lowest prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis of any population yet studiedThe Tsimane people – a forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian Amazon – have the lowest reported levels of vascular ageing for any population, with coronary atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) being five times less common than in the US, according to a study published in The Lancet and being presented at the American College of Cardiology conference.
 
 
 What Happens to the Body When we Diet?
 
What Happens to the Body When we Diet?The body starts to respond to healthy dietary changes as soon as they are made. This can be advantageous, because a diet can then eventually reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease, as well as improve a person’s overall sense of well-being.
 
 
 Medications, PCI equally beneficial for treating complete blockage in heart's arteries
 
Medications, PCI equally beneficial for treating complete blockage in heart's arteriesIn patients with a complete blockage in the heart's arteries that persists over time, treatment with medications alone was found to be equal to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a procedure to open blocked arteries, in terms of major adverse events over three years, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
 
 
 Metabolic Syndrome and Bariatric Surgery
 
Metabolic Syndrome and Bariatric SurgeryAlso called weight loss surgery, bariatric surgery is a procedure used to treat people who have become dangerously obese.
 
 
 New stenting tool found to be less painful and cheaper than current methods
 
New stenting tool found to be less painful and cheaper than current methodsA new tool for assessing the narrowing of the heart's arteries was found to be as effective as current methods and less painful for patients.
 
 
 Many Canadian family doctors still use manual devices to measure blood pressure, study shows
 
Many Canadian family doctors still use manual devices to measure blood pressure, study showsA study by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) shows that more than half of family doctors in Canada are still using manual devices to measure blood pressure, a dated technology that often leads to misdiagnosis.
 
 
 Simple fix could eliminate unnecessary coronary stenting procedures
 
Simple fix could eliminate unnecessary coronary stenting proceduresPhysician researchers at Thomas Jefferson University suspect that some cases of coronary artery spasm go unrecognized and are incorrectly treated with stents.
 
 
 Tulane researcher aims to improve hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women
 
Tulane researcher aims to improve hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal womenNew research at the Tulane School of Medicine is looking at an estrogen receptor that could be a site for targeted hormone replacement therapy in post-menopausal women.
 
 
 Why don’t patients always discuss hyperglycemia with their doctor?
 
Why don’t patients always discuss hyperglycemia with their doctor?Hyperglycemia occurs when a patient has higher than normal blood sugar levels. If the levels are very high, consistently 13-14 or above, the patient will start to feel tired, thirsty and feel the urge to go to the toilet frequently to pass urine (micturition).
 
 
 Online behavioral intervention reduces systolic blood pressure by 10 mmHg, study finds
 
Online behavioral intervention reduces systolic blood pressure by 10 mmHg, study findsIn the first randomized, double-blinded trial of an online behavioral intervention for high blood pressure, participants in web-based lifestyle counseling reduced their systolic blood pressure (the higher number in a blood-pressure reading) by 10 mmHg, compared with a 6 mmHg reduction for those taking part in a web-based control intervention, a statistically significant difference.
 
 
 Study finds low utilization rates of life-saving medications for high-risk PE patients
 
Study finds low utilization rates of life-saving medications for high-risk PE patientsPulmonary embolism (PE), a blood clot in the lungs which causes shortness of breath and chest pain, is the third leading cardiovascular cause of death in the United States with more than 100, 000 lives taken each year.