Scientists discover biological fingerprint in children with tuberculosis meningitis
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  June 27, 2017  
  Pediatrics  
  The latest pediatrics news from News Medical  
 Scientists discover biological fingerprint in children with tuberculosis meningitisScientists discover biological fingerprint in children with tuberculosis meningitis
 
Children with tuberculosis meningitis - a brain and spinal cord infection that leads to disability and death -- have a biological fingerprint that can be used to assess the severity of the condition, help decide the best course of treatment, and provide clues for novel treatments, scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, Imperial College London and the University of Cape Town reveal.
 
 
 Fathers' increased involvement with caregiving linked to decreased odds of childhood obesityFathers' increased involvement with caregiving linked to decreased odds of childhood obesity
 
Fathers are becoming more involved with raising children, but limited research has examined their association with childhood obesity.
 
   Premature infants have greater risk of SIDS than full-term babiesPremature infants have greater risk of SIDS than full-term babies
 
Premature infants still have a greater risk compared to full-term babies of dying of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths despite recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that hospital NICU's provide more safe infant sleep education to parents before they go home.
 
   Flat head syndrome does not have consequences beyond cosmeticsFlat head syndrome does not have consequences beyond cosmetics
 
The number of infants who develop flat head syndrome -; deformational plagiocephaly – has increased significantly since the start of the Back to Sleep campaign to combat Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in the 1990s.
 
   Researchers find link between lutein levels in the eye and cognition, achievement in childhoodResearchers find link between lutein levels in the eye and cognition, achievement in childhood
 
Researchers can look into your eyes to determine whether you're getting your lutein, a pigment found in green leafy vegetables that is known to accumulate in the brain.
 
 Could a blood test predict how cancer spreads in children?
 
Could a blood test predict how cancer spreads in children?Traditionally, we use biopsies to try to predict how cancer spreads. There are a number of molecular markers that are used, but biopsy is a limited approach. Now, the current trend is to use liquid biopsy, which is basically a blood sample.
 
 
 Physicians use age-old practice to toilet train their infant daughter
 
Physicians use age-old practice to toilet train their infant daughterYou know that disposable diapers are ecologically questionable, but cloth diapers seem too messy for you and your child -- is there an alternative? The answer is 'yes' according to Jeffrey M. Bender, MD, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Rosemary C. She, MD, a pathologist and medical microbiologist at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California.
 
 
 Vaccines can be blamed for any illness even with lack of evidence says EU court
 
Vaccines can be blamed for any illness even with lack of evidence says EU courtIn a landmark judgment yesterday, the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled that courts could consider vaccines to be the reason for an illness despite the absence of any concrete evidence to support the connection.
 
 
 UCLA-led study reveals possibility of CMV and HIV transmission from mothers to infants
 
UCLA-led study reveals possibility of CMV and HIV transmission from mothers to infantsHIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to their infants, according to a UCLA-led study.
 
 
 Standardized care for premature infants during first week of life improves survival rates
 
Standardized care for premature infants during first week of life improves survival ratesThe University of Alabama at Birmingham Regional Neonatal Intensive Care Unit created the Golden Week program to improve outcomes for infants born prematurely at 28 weeks' gestation or earlier.
 
 
 Working to facilitate early mental health support for young people
 
Working to facilitate early mental health support for young peopleAlarming statistics from the Mental Health Foundation indicate that there is clearly an unmet need in the provision of childhood mental health care and that mental health issues among children and adolescents are becoming increasingly common.