Research lays groundwork to develop realistic ‘biomimetic neuroprosthetics’
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  May 16, 2017  
  Pharmacy / Pharmacology  
  The latest pharmacy / pharmacology news from News Medical  
 Research lays groundwork to develop realistic ‘biomimetic neuroprosthetics’Research lays groundwork to develop realistic ‘biomimetic neuroprosthetics’
 
By applying a novel computer algorithm to mimic how the brain learns, a team of researchers – with the aid of the Comet supercomputer based at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego and the Center's Neuroscience Gateway – has identified and replicated neural circuitry that resembles the way an unimpaired brain controls limb movement.
 
 
 Study generates comprehensive catalog of diseases linked to variations in HLA genesStudy generates comprehensive catalog of diseases linked to variations in HLA genes
 
A study led by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy has generated the first comprehensive catalog of diseases associated with variations in human leukocyte antigen genes that regulate the body's immune system.
 
   Stress management may be promising strategy to treat abdominal pain in IBD patientsStress management may be promising strategy to treat abdominal pain in IBD patients
 
When researchers analyzed published studies on how to treat recurrent abdominal pain among patients with inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, stress management appeared to be a promising strategy.
 
   Research identifies protein that could help patients respond more positively to epilepsy drug therapiesResearch identifies protein that could help patients respond more positively to epilepsy drug therapies
 
New research from the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with the Mario Negri Institute in Milan, published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, has identified a protein that could help patients with epilepsy respond more positively to drug therapies.
 
   New spherical nucleic acid drug crosses blood-brain barrier to target brain tumors in animalsNew spherical nucleic acid drug crosses blood-brain barrier to target brain tumors in animals
 
The first drug using spherical nucleic acids to be systemically given to humans has been developed by Northwestern University scientists and approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an investigational new drug for an early-stage clinical trial in the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme.
 
 Boosting clinical trial research in London
 
Boosting clinical trial research in LondonRichmond Pharmacology have opened their fourth clinical trial facility and the new site has been used for this type of work for more than 30 years. It's in an ideal location embedded in the University and teaching hospital campus.
 
 
 Researchers find many postmarket safety events after FDA approval of new drugs
 
Researchers find many postmarket safety events after FDA approval of new drugsHow often are safety concerns raised about a drug after it's been approved by the FDA? Nicholas Downing, MD, of the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and colleagues have found that for drugs approved between 2001 and 2010, nearly 1 in 3 had a postmarket safety event.
 
 
 Natural compound in grape seed extract could increase strength, life of composite-resin fillings
 
Natural compound in grape seed extract could increase strength, life of composite-resin fillingsA natural compound found in grape seed extract could be used to strengthen dentin -- the tissue beneath a tooth's enamel -- and increase the life of resin fillings, according to new research at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry.
 
 
 Deep-learning network provides accurate detection and delineation of breast cancers on biopsy slides
 
Deep-learning network provides accurate detection and delineation of breast cancers on biopsy slidesA deep-learning computer network developed through research led by Case Western Reserve University was 100 percent accurate in determining whether invasive forms of breast cancer were present in whole biopsy slides.