Study shows possibility to reduce antipsychotic use among nursing home residents with dementia
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  April 18, 2017  
  Nursing  
  The latest nursing news from News Medical  
 Study shows possibility to reduce antipsychotic use among nursing home residents with dementiaStudy shows possibility to reduce antipsychotic use among nursing home residents with dementia
 
The use of antipsychotic medication in nearly 100 Massachusetts nursing homes was significantly reduced when staff was trained to recognize challenging behaviors of cognitively impaired residents as communication of their unmet needs, according to a new study led by Jennifer Tjia, MD, MSCE, associate professor of quantitative health sciences.
 
 
 International survey reveals 16% of children in pediatric ICUs have acute neurological conditionsInternational survey reveals 16% of children in pediatric ICUs have acute neurological conditions
 
Sixteen percent of children in pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) have acute neurological conditions with brain damage due to cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury, or other causes, reports an international survey study in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.
 
   Study examines how pregnancy risk factors affect outcomes of home and birthing center deliveriesStudy examines how pregnancy risk factors affect outcomes of home and birthing center deliveries
 
Women with some characteristics commonly thought to increase pregnancy risks -- being over age 35; being overweight; and in some cases, having a vaginal birth after a cesarean section -- tend to have good outcomes when they give birth at home or in a birth center, a new assessment has found.
 
   Researchers uncover mechanism that leads to disorders in pancreatic development, infant diabetesResearchers uncover mechanism that leads to disorders in pancreatic development, infant diabetes
 
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, have uncovered a mechanism through which a mutation in the STAT3 gene leads to a disorder in the development of the pancreas and to infant diabetes.
 
   Researchers develop new tool to gauge young adult patient's firearm violence riskResearchers develop new tool to gauge young adult patient's firearm violence risk
 
Homicide is the third-leading cause of death among young people ages 15 to 24. More than 87 percent of those homicides are due to firearms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
 Complex, conflicting state laws pose barriers to medical decision-making, study reveals
 
Complex, conflicting state laws pose barriers to medical decision-making, study revealsA patchwork of state laws creates a labyrinth that can make it confusing to navigate incapacitated patients' medical wishes.
 
 
 'Love hormone' could hold key to treating drug addicts, say experts
 
'Love hormone' could hold key to treating drug addicts, say expertsExperts say oxytocin, a key hormone made naturally by the brain, could hold the key to treating drug addicts and help them avoid relapse.
 
 
 Children more adversely affected from ATV-related accidents than adults
 
Children more adversely affected from ATV-related accidents than adultsAll-terrain vehicle-related injuries remain a large public health problem in this country, with children more adversely affected than adults. According to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, the major risk factors for young riders also are entirely preventable.
 
 
 Medication-assisted treatment reduces negative health outcomes for pregnant women with OUD
 
Medication-assisted treatment reduces negative health outcomes for pregnant women with OUDMedication for addiction treatment (MAT) with buprenorphine or methadone is an appropriate and accepted treatment for pregnant women with opioid use disorder (OUD), according to a research review and update in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
 
 
 Conscious sedation is viable option to general anesthesia for TAVR, UCLA study finds
 
Conscious sedation is viable option to general anesthesia for TAVR, UCLA study findsUCLA scientists have found that conscious sedation -; a type of anesthesia in which patients remain awake but are sleepy and pain-free -; is a safe and viable option to general anesthesia for people undergoing a minimally invasive heart procedure called transcatheter aortic valve replacement.