Magnetic nanoparticle aggregates can induce death of cancer cells
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  June 27, 2017  
  Nanomedicine  
  The latest nanomedicine news from News Medical  
 Magnetic nanoparticle aggregates can induce death of cancer cellsMagnetic nanoparticle aggregates can induce death of cancer cells
 
An international team in which a UPM researcher is involved has shown that it is possible to mechanically destroy cancer cells by rotating magnetic nanoparticles attached to them in elongated aggregates.
 
 
 Tiny biological nanoparticles offer enormous potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applicationsTiny biological nanoparticles offer enormous potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications
 
Exosomes - tiny biological nanoparticles which transfer information between cells - offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease, the most comprehensive overview so far of research in the field has concluded.
 
   Carbon nanotubes show great potential to facilitate neuronal regenerationCarbon nanotubes show great potential to facilitate neuronal regeneration
 
Carbon nanotubes exhibit interesting characteristics rendering them particularly suited to the construction of special hybrid devices - consisting of biological issue and synthetic material - planned to re-establish connections between nerve cells, for instance at spinal level, lost on account of lesions or trauma.
 
   Hybrid filter offers low-cost option for purification of arsenic-contaminated waterHybrid filter offers low-cost option for purification of arsenic-contaminated water
 
The news story made a big splash: in January 2016 ETH researchers Professor Raffaele Mezzenga and his senior researcher Sreenath Bolisetty published a study in the journal Nature Nanotechnology about an innovative type of membrane developed in their laboratory.
 
   Researchers use quantum dots to decipher design features for new therapies aimed at MSResearchers use quantum dots to decipher design features for new therapies aimed at MS
 
Researchers in the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering (BIOE) Jewell Laboratory are using quantum dots - tiny semiconductor particles commonly used in nanotechnology - to decipher the features needed to design specific and effective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases.
 
 AFM Workshop's Atomic Force Microscopes for Nanoparticle Characterization
 
AFM Workshop's Atomic Force Microscopes for Nanoparticle CharacterizationThe Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) allows for 3D characterization of nanoparticles with sub-nanometer resolution. Nanoparticle characterization using Atomic Force Microscopy has a number of advantages over dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy and optical characterization methods.
 
 
 Emphasis on nanotechnology, pharmaceutical science, forensics, food safety and bioanalytical for Pittcon's annual call for papers
 
Emphasis on nanotechnology, pharmaceutical science, forensics, food safety and bioanalytical for Pittcon's annual call for papersThe Program Committee is pleased to announce the call for papers for the Pittcon 2018 Technical Program. Abstracts are currently being accepted for contributed oral and poster presentations in all areas of analytic chemistry and applied spectroscopy in applications such as, but not limited to, environmental science, food science, energy research, and informatics.
 
 
 Simple tool based on DNA barcoding technology enables naked-eye authentication of food
 
Simple tool based on DNA barcoding technology enables naked-eye authentication of foodIs the food on the shelf really that what is written on the label? Its DNA would give it away, but the DNA barcoding technology, which can be used for this purpose, is labor-intensive.
 
 
 Scientists design bioactive nanomaterial that excels at stimulating bone regeneration
 
Scientists design bioactive nanomaterial that excels at stimulating bone regenerationThere hasn't been a gold standard for how orthopaedic spine surgeons promote new bone growth in patients, but now Northwestern University scientists have designed a bioactive nanomaterial that is so good at stimulating bone regeneration it could become the method surgeons prefer.
 
 
 Could a blood test predict how cancer spreads in children?
 
Could a blood test predict how cancer spreads in children?Traditionally, we use biopsies to try to predict how cancer spreads. There are a number of molecular markers that are used, but biopsy is a limited approach. Now, the current trend is to use liquid biopsy, which is basically a blood sample.