Traumatic events during adolescence can raise women’s risk of depression during menopause
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  April 4, 2017  
  Menopause  
  The latest menopause news from News Medical  
 Traumatic events during adolescence can raise women’s risk of depression during menopauseTraumatic events during adolescence can raise women’s risk of depression during menopause
 
Although depression is common during a woman's transition to menopause, understanding who is at-risk of experiencing major depressive disorder (MDD) during this period of hormonal fluctuation were previously unknown.
 
 
 New drug compound could cut number of hot flushes in menopausal womenNew drug compound could cut number of hot flushes in menopausal women
 
Women plagued by frequent hot flushes during the menopause could cut the number of flushes by almost three-quarters, thanks to a new drug compound.
 
   Tulane researcher aims to improve hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal womenTulane researcher aims to improve hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women
 
New research at the Tulane School of Medicine is looking at an estrogen receptor that could be a site for targeted hormone replacement therapy in post-menopausal women.
 
   South Asian women could be at greater risk of developing osteoporosis in later life, study findsSouth Asian women could be at greater risk of developing osteoporosis in later life, study finds
 
Pre-menopausal South Asian women could be more at risk of developing osteoporosis in later life than white Caucasian women, a new study in the Journal Bone reports.
 
 Excessive sweating could be hyperhidrosis that often goes undiagnosed
 
Excessive sweating could be hyperhidrosis that often goes undiagnosedHyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that is more than what is needed to regulate body temperature. About 7 million Americans suffer from hyperhidrosis, a disorder that often goes undiagnosed.
 
 
 Researchers explore factors that influence patient's intent to get colorectal cancer screening
 
Researchers explore factors that influence patient's intent to get colorectal cancer screeningA patient's confidence in their ability to schedule, plan for and properly conduct their part in colorectal screening methods is a key factor that predicts whether they intend to be tested, according to new research from Penn State College of Medicine. The findings suggest that educating patients could improve screening rates.