Moffitt researchers develop novel drug that may help combat castration-resistant prostate cancer
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  June 12, 2017  
  Prostate Cancer  
  The latest prostate cancer news from News Medical  
 Moffitt researchers develop novel drug that may help combat castration-resistant prostate cancerMoffitt researchers develop novel drug that may help combat castration-resistant prostate cancer
 
Prostate cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in men in the United States. It is estimated that 161,360 men will be diagnosed and more than 26,700 men will die from the disease in this year.
 
 
 New diagnostic test uses machine learning to accurately detect aggressive prostate cancerNew diagnostic test uses machine learning to accurately detect aggressive prostate cancer
 
A new diagnostic developed by Alberta scientists will allow men to bypass painful biopsies to test for aggressive prostate cancer.
 
   Study: Black and white men with prostate cancer prioritize treatment-related factors differentlyStudy: Black and white men with prostate cancer prioritize treatment-related factors differently
 
When it comes to making decisions about which prostate cancer treatment to choose, black and white men prioritize certain treatment-related factors differently, according to a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center study.
 
 Researchers examine link between income level and cancer diagnosis
 
Researchers examine link between income level and cancer diagnosisDo wealthier people receive too much medical care? In a Perspective article recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, H. Gilbert Welch, MD, and Elliott Fisher, MD, of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice examine the association between income level and cancer diagnosis.
 
 
 New genomic sequencing approach could be first step toward blood tests for early cancer detection
 
New genomic sequencing approach could be first step toward blood tests for early cancer detectionIn a study of 124 patients with advanced breast, lung, and prostate cancers, a new, high-intensity genomic sequencing approach detected circulating tumor DNA at a high rate.