Maternal education can act as 'social vaccine' for childhood malaria infection, study finds
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  May 22, 2017  
  Malaria  
  The latest malaria news from News Medical  
 Maternal education can act as 'social vaccine' for childhood malaria infection, study findsMaternal education can act as 'social vaccine' for childhood malaria infection, study finds
 
Every two minutes, a child will die from malaria in Africa. It is a preventable, treatable disease, that each year affects approximately 200 million people globally.
 
 
 New UCI Malaria Initiative aims to disrupt deadly disease transmission in AfricaNew UCI Malaria Initiative aims to disrupt deadly disease transmission in Africa
 
University of California, Irvine vector biologist Anthony James will lead a multimillion-dollar effort to cultivate new strains of mosquitoes to fight malaria in Africa.
 
   Mothers infected with malaria during pregnancy can alter infants’ immunityMothers infected with malaria during pregnancy can alter infants’ immunity
 
Mothers infected with malaria during pregnancy can pass more of their own cells to their baby and change the infant's risk of later infection, a new study shows.
 
   Study uncovers potential new therapeutic targets for HCV infectionsStudy uncovers potential new therapeutic targets for HCV infections
 
An international study led by researchers at Monash University' Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) has shone light on the way the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) hijacks the communication systems in the host cells it infects, uncovering potential new therapeutic targets for the disease.
 
   Metabolite 'signatures' can accurately distinguish typhoid from other fever-inducing diseasesMetabolite 'signatures' can accurately distinguish typhoid from other fever-inducing diseases
 
Researchers have identified a metabolite 'signature' that can accurately distinguish typhoid from other fever-inducing tropical diseases using patient blood samples.
 
 Symptoms and Causes of Enlarged Spleen (Splenomegaly)
 
Symptoms and Causes of Enlarged Spleen (Splenomegaly)The spleen is an organ tucked away behind the stomach, on the left side of the abdomen. It has several immune and hematologic functions. Enlargement of the spleen is called splenomegaly. In the vast majority of cases, splenomegaly is secondary to other disorders because of its role in many metabolic processes.
 
 
 Enlarged Spleen (Splenomegaly)
 
Enlarged Spleen (Splenomegaly)The spleen is an intra-abdominal organ located just below the left side of the ribcage, behind the stomach. It is involved in removing abnormal or worn-out red cells from the blood, and also contributes to the immune function of the body, by providing antibodies and lymphocytes.
 
 
 Causes of Spleen Pain
 
Causes of Spleen PainThe spleen is an organ situated behind the stomach, in the upper left part of the abdomen known as the left hypochondrium. It is located under the ribcage and therefore is not usually felt by the palpating finger. However, in abnormal conditions it may give rise to pain felt as an aching sensation deep behind the left ribcage. This area may also hurt when it is touched. This could signal splenic damage, splenic rupture, or splenomegaly.
 
 
 Patient Populations at Risk of Anaemia
 
Patient Populations at Risk of AnaemiaAnaemia is a disorder that occurs when the of red blood cell count is lower than normal and when haemoglobin levels are insufficient. Approximately 1.6 billion people or 25% of the global population are affected by anaemia.1
 
 
 How is an Enlarged Spleen Diagnosed?
 
How is an Enlarged Spleen Diagnosed?The normal spleen is usually not palpable but is tucked beneath and above the left costal margin, between the fundus of the stomach and the diaphragm, with its long axis parallel to and running along the course of the tenth rib. When it enlarges, its lower border moves downwards and medially towards the middle of the anterior margin of the left ribcage.
 
 
 Researchers uncover structural details that make eye-targeting virus a better tool for future therapies
 
Researchers uncover structural details that make eye-targeting virus a better tool for future therapiesIn their quest to replicate themselves, viruses have gotten awfully good at tricking human cells into pumping out viral proteins. That's why scientists have been working to use viruses as forces for good: to deliver useful genes to human cells and help patients who lack important proteins or enzymes.
 
 
 New WHO data highlights improvements made by countries in collecting death statistics
 
New WHO data highlights improvements made by countries in collecting death statisticsAlmost half of all deaths globally are now recorded with a cause, new data from the World Health Organization show, highlighting improvements countries have made on collecting vital statistics and monitoring progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals.
 
 
 Living Without a Spleen
 
Living Without a SpleenAsplenia, or the absence of a spleen, may be the result of functional or anatomical deficiency in spleen function.