Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction) News and Research

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A Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction) occurs when blood flow to a section of heart muscle becomes blocked. If the flow of blood isn’t restored quickly, the section of heart muscle becomes damaged from lack of oxygen and begins to die.

Heart attack is a leading killer of both men and women in the United States. But fortunately, today there are excellent treatments for heart attack that can save lives and prevent disabilities. Treatment is most effective when started within 1 hour of the beginning of symptoms. Heart attacks occur most often as a result of a condition called coronary artery disease (CAD). In CAD, a fatty material called plaque (plak) builds up over many years on the inside walls of the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to your heart). Eventually, an area of plaque can rupture, causing a blood clot to form on the surface of the plaque. If the clot becomes large enough, it can mostly or completely block the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the part of the heart muscle fed by the artery.
Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

New discovery has potential to transform heart attack treatments

New discovery has potential to transform heart attack treatments

High aerobic fitness in late adolescence may reduce heart attack risk later in life

High aerobic fitness in late adolescence may reduce heart attack risk later in life

Specialists use pioneering treatment to reduce high blood pressure in kidney patient

Specialists use pioneering treatment to reduce high blood pressure in kidney patient

Heart disease signs in newborns: an interview with Dr Michael Skilton, University of Sydney

Heart disease signs in newborns: an interview with Dr Michael Skilton, University of Sydney

Weight loss and heart damage: an interview with Dr Lili Barouch, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Weight loss and heart damage: an interview with Dr Lili Barouch, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A predicts cardiovascular events: Study

Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A predicts cardiovascular events: Study

Cardiovascular disease risk in women higher than you think

Cardiovascular disease risk in women higher than you think

Air pollution and heart attacks: an interview with Dr Cathryn Tonne, LSHTM

Air pollution and heart attacks: an interview with Dr Cathryn Tonne, LSHTM

Thyroid hormone may help reduce heart damage in humans with cardiac diseases

Thyroid hormone may help reduce heart damage in humans with cardiac diseases

Air pollution associated with increased deaths after heart attacks

Air pollution associated with increased deaths after heart attacks

BMI may influence which blood pressure treatments work best

BMI may influence which blood pressure treatments work best

Heart attack centres: an interview with Dr Sayan Sen

Heart attack centres: an interview with Dr Sayan Sen

Weight loss and quality of sleep: an interview with Kerry Stewart

Weight loss and quality of sleep: an interview with Kerry Stewart

Injury prevention – research and practice: an interview with Dr Dale Hanson

Injury prevention – research and practice: an interview with Dr Dale Hanson

Stroke survivors who smoke risk their life

Stroke survivors who smoke risk their life

Type 2 diabetes screening: an interview with Dr Simon Griffin, MRC Epidemiology Unit at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge

Type 2 diabetes screening: an interview with Dr Simon Griffin, MRC Epidemiology Unit at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge

Death rates after surgery: an interview with Dr Rupert Pearse

Death rates after surgery: an interview with Dr Rupert Pearse

Resuscitation after cardiac arrest: an interview with Zach Goldberger

Resuscitation after cardiac arrest: an interview with Zach Goldberger

Converting blood cells to a stem cell state: an interview with Elias Zambidis, M.D., Ph.D.

Converting blood cells to a stem cell state: an interview with Elias Zambidis, M.D., Ph.D.