Urinary Incontinence News and Research

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Urinary incontinence (UI), or the unintentional loss of urine, is a problem for more than 13 million Americans—85 percent of them women. Although about half of the elderly have episodes of incontinence, bladder problems are not a natural consequence of aging, and they are not exclusively a problem of the elderly.

Incontinence has several causes. Women are most likely to develop incontinence either during pregnancy and childbirth, or after the hormonal changes of menopause, because of weakened pelvic muscles. Older men can become incontinent as the result of prostate surgery. Pelvic trauma, spinal cord damage, caffeine, or medications including cold or over-the-counter diet tablets also can cause episodes of incontinence.

But even though urinary incontinence can be improved in 8 out of 10 cases, fewer than half of those with bladder problems ever discuss the condition with their health care professional. The condition often goes untreated.
Custom-made bladders produced from patients' own cells

Custom-made bladders produced from patients' own cells

First human recipients of laboratory-grown organs

First human recipients of laboratory-grown organs

Quality of care provided for elderly osteoarthritic patients needs improvement

Quality of care provided for elderly osteoarthritic patients needs improvement

Depression and urinary incontinence go hand in hand

Depression and urinary incontinence go hand in hand

Anticholinergic drugs may lead to mild mental impairment in elderly

Anticholinergic drugs may lead to mild mental impairment in elderly

Kegel exercises reduce urinary incontinence in women

Kegel exercises reduce urinary incontinence in women

Weight loss and exercise reduces urinary incontinence in women with prediabetes

Weight loss and exercise reduces urinary incontinence in women with prediabetes

Pelvic floor muscle training helps reduce urinary incontinence in women

Pelvic floor muscle training helps reduce urinary incontinence in women

Increased attention should be paid to incontinence

Increased attention should be paid to incontinence

Childbirth not linked to urinary incontinence

Childbirth not linked to urinary incontinence

Promising new treatment options for prostate cancer

Promising new treatment options for prostate cancer

First human trials start in Canada for muscle-derived stem cells as a treatment for urinary incontinence

First human trials start in Canada for muscle-derived stem cells as a treatment for urinary incontinence

Episiotomies still common despite global recommendations to restrict use

Episiotomies still common despite global recommendations to restrict use

Minimally invasive prostate removal aided by a robot has possible benefits, high cost

Minimally invasive prostate removal aided by a robot has possible benefits, high cost

Physiotherapy is effective in treating stress incontinence

Physiotherapy is effective in treating stress incontinence

Episiotomy usually provides no benefits

Episiotomy usually provides no benefits

cT3 prostate cancer is operable

cT3 prostate cancer is operable

Social and cultural factors play a significant role in the treatment decisions of patients with prostate cancer

Social and cultural factors play a significant role in the treatment decisions of patients with prostate cancer

Important that menopause not  viewed as a disease

Important that menopause not viewed as a disease

Increased risk of urinary incontinence with hormone therapy

Increased risk of urinary incontinence with hormone therapy