Guideline Acceptable Troponin I

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The Acute Care™ cTnl assay on the Stratus® CS Acute Care™ Diagnostic System was the first to the market with a guideline acceptable sensitive Troponin-I assay in 2004 and meets the ESC/ACC Joint Committee recommendations of ≤10% CV at the 99th percentile of normal population. This assay is used for the measurement of cardiac troponin I to aid in the diagnosis of AMI and in the risk stratification of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS).

  • One sample, one run, one instrument; increased efficiency in triaging chest pain patients
  • Rapid turnaround time - in as little as 14 minutes (with onboard centrifugation)
  • A 99% percentile at 0.07 ng/mL
  • A 10% CV at 0.06 ng/mL

Features & Benefits

  • One sample, one run, one instrument: increased efficiency in triaging chest pain patients
  • Rapid turnaround time – in as little as 14 minutes (with onboard centrifugation)
                    o  Single and ready to use TestPaks
                    o  No reconstitution
                    o  No warming to room temperature
                    o  Reduction in reagent waste
                    o  Reduction in contamination
  • Heparinized whole blood samples
  • Electronic QC (System Check) satisfies daily routine QC requirements permitting liquid QC flexibility
  • A 10% CV at 0.06 ng/mL
  • A 99% percentile at 0.07 ng/mL

Clinical Use

Cardiac troponin I measurements can be used as an aid in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Cardiac troponin I can also be used as an aid in the risk stratification of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with respect to their relative risk of mortality. Given the impressive levels of myocardial specificity and sensitivity, the ESC/ACC Joint Committee has recognized troponin as the preferred biochemical marker for myocardial damage and redefined acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in part, as a rise and gradual fall of troponin levels.