Recombinant 2019-nCoV RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRp)

A novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global COVID-19 pandemic of respiratory disease in 2020.1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is an enzyme that is crucial to life cycle of RNA viruses including coronaviruses.2

RdRp catalyzes the synthesis of viral RNA, thereby playing a central role in the replication and transcription cycle of COVID-19 viruses, possibly in complex with nsp7 and nsp8.3

Therefore, RdRp is a prime target for nucleotide analog antiviral inhibitors, such as remedesivir, for development of new antiviral therapeutics.4

Product specifications

Activity

Sample Activity Plot.

Determined by detection of pyrophosphate (PPi) generated during nascent strand synthesis by a chemiluminescent coupled assay method using ATP sulfurylase and luciferase. Sample Activity Plot. Image Credit: SignalChem Biotech

For specific data on a given lot, users can refer to the related technical data sheet.

Purity

Sample Purity Data.

Sample Purity Data. Image Credit: SignalChem Biotech

For specific data on a given lot, users can refer to the related technical data sheet.

Storage, stability, and shipping

The product should be stored at –70 °C. For optimal storage, the target can be aliquoted into smaller quantities after centrifugation and then stored at the suggested temperature. For best performance, multiple freeze/thaw cycles and frequent handling should be avoided.

Molecular weight

~100 kDa

References

  1. Zhou P, et al: A pneumonia outbreak associated with a new coronavirus of probable bat origin. Nature. 2020, 579:270-89
  2. Subissi L, et al: One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111: E3900–E3909.
  3. Gao Y, et al: Structure of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from COVID-19 virus. Science. 2020, 368: 779-782.
  4. Wang M, et al: Remdesivir and chloroquine effectively inhibit the recently emerged novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in vitro. Cell Res. 2020, 30:269–271.