Medical University of Vienna to partner with bio.logis GIM in pharmacogenetics
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 Medical University of Vienna to partner with bio.logis GIM in pharmacogeneticsMedical University of Vienna to partner with bio.logis GIM in pharmacogenetics
 
Within the framework of U-PGx, an EU project for promoting the use of pharmacogenetic insights in healthcare, the Medical University of Vienna will implement the Genetic Information Management Suite developed by bio.logis Genetic Information Management GmbH.
 
 
 Understanding Stereo-Selective Metabolism in Drug Discover and DevelopmentUnderstanding Stereo-Selective Metabolism in Drug Discover and Development
 
“In order to understand the actions of drugs, it is an absolute necessity to have knowledge of the transformations they undergo in the body. We must not judge drugs according to the form and amount administered, but rather according to the form and amount which actually is eliciting the action.”
 
   New analysis finds link between inflammatory bowel disease and history of weight loss surgeryNew analysis finds link between inflammatory bowel disease and history of weight loss surgery
 
A new Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics analysis has found a link between the development of inflammatory bowel disease and a past history of weight loss surgery.
 
   New study indicates possible misuse or abuse of ADHD medicationNew study indicates possible misuse or abuse of ADHD medication
 
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study indicates that methylphenidate, a central nervous system stimulant approved to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, may be subject to misuse and/or abuse.
 
   New research does not support previous findings that antidepressants impact breastfeedingNew research does not support previous findings that antidepressants impact breastfeeding
 
New research does not support the previously observed negative impacts of antidepressant use on breastfeeding. In the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study, use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in late pregnancy was not linked with an increased risk of women experiencing low milk supply.
 
 Study uncovers more complex, elaborate role for the body’s macromolecular complexes
 
Study uncovers more complex, elaborate role for the body’s macromolecular complexesScientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program have uncovered evidence that shows a more complex and elaborate role for the body's hard-working G protein-coupled receptors than previously thought, suggesting a conceptual advance in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology.
 
 
 SSRIs may be more effective option for treating anxious youth, UC research shows
 
SSRIs may be more effective option for treating anxious youth, UC research showsFor children and adolescents who require medication to treat anxiety, there are two primary classes of antidepressants that are prescribed: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.
 
 
 Researchers achieve 80% reduction in liver metastasis by restricting growth of blood vessels
 
Researchers achieve 80% reduction in liver metastasis by restricting growth of blood vesselsThe International Journal of Cancer has just published the results of an experimental therapy tested on mice. The research, led by the Signaling Lab research group of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy and the Department of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology of the University of Santiago de Compostela, achieved an 80% reduction in liver metastasis brought about by colon cancer.
 
 
 NSAID use linked to increased risk of atrial fibrillation
 
NSAID use linked to increased risk of atrial fibrillationUse of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with an 18% increased risk of atrial fibrillation—an irregular, often rapid heart rate—in a study of middle-aged adults in Taiwan. The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.
 
 
 Omissions on death certificates lead to undercounting of opioid overdoses
 
Omissions on death certificates lead to undercounting of opioid overdosesIn a refrigerator in the coroner’s office in Marion County, Ind., rows of vials await testing. They contain blood, urine and vitreous, the fluid collected from inside a human eye.
 
 
 MSU scientists test promising drug to prevent cancer in high-risk patients
 
MSU scientists test promising drug to prevent cancer in high-risk patientsMichigan State University scientists are testing a promising drug that may stop a gene associated with obesity from triggering breast and lung cancer, as well as prevent these cancers from growing.
 
 
 Scientists demonstrate successful implementation of prosthetic memory system
 
Scientists demonstrate successful implementation of prosthetic memory systemScientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and the University of Southern California (USC) have demonstrated the successful implementation of a prosthetic system that uses a person's own memory patterns to facilitate the brain's ability to encode and recall memory.
 
 
 Of ‘miracles’ and money: Why hemophilia drugs are so expensive
 
Of ‘miracles’ and money: Why hemophilia drugs are so expensiveWhen Landon Morris was diagnosed with hemophilia shortly after birth, his mother, Jessica Morris, was devastated. "It was like having your dreams — all the dreams you imagined for your child — just kind of disappear," she recalled.
 
 
 Your stress can rub off on others
 
Your stress can rub off on othersIn a recent study, scientists found that when exposed to another individual’s stress, the brain reacts as it does to real stress.
 
 
 Early life stress or trauma could rewire the brain for later neuropathological disorders
 
Early life stress or trauma could rewire the brain for later neuropathological disordersFederal researchers have discovered that severe stress or trauma early in life could actually change how the brain responds to stress hormones, essentially "re-wiring" the brain for later neuropathological disorders, according to a study, "A role for corticotrophin releasing factor signaling in the lateral habenula and its modulation by early life stress," published in Science Signaling, March 6.
 
 
 Long-term PPI use not linked to increased hip fracture risk among Alzheimer's patients
 
Long-term PPI use not linked to increased hip fracture risk among Alzheimer's patientsLong-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use does not increase the risk of hip fracture among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.
 
 
 SLU researchers turn off excruciating chemo pain in animal model
 
SLU researchers turn off excruciating chemo pain in animal modelIn a recent paper published in the journal Pain, Saint Louis University researchers describe their success in an animal model in turning off the excruciating pain that often accompanies a colorectal cancer drug.
 
 
 Research misconduct allegations shadow likely CDC appointee
 
Research misconduct allegations shadow likely CDC appointeeA more than 20-year-old controversy over shoddy HIV research is re-emerging as a significant criticism of President Donald Trump's likely pick to lead the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
 
 Study questions efficacy, safety of intranasal ketamine for depression
 
Study questions efficacy, safety of intranasal ketamine for depressionNasal spray devices have been touted as a promising way to deliver ketamine to patients with treatment-resistant depression, with this application easier to use and less invasive than other clinical delivery methods such as injections.
 
 
 Phase I clinical trial of HIV vaccines to begin in the U.S.
 
Phase I clinical trial of HIV vaccines to begin in the U.S.A Phase I clinical trial testing the safety of vaccines that might have the potential to prevent HIV infection will begin this month at four sites in the United States, marking the latest step in a three-decade quest at UMass Medical School to harness the power of DNA vaccines in addressing a major global health threat.
 
 
 Research pinpoints potential weak link in bacterial wall-building protein
 
Research pinpoints potential weak link in bacterial wall-building proteinThe wall that surrounds bacteria to shield them from external assaults has long been a tantalizing target for drug therapies. Indeed, some of modern medicine's most reliable antibiotics disarm harmful bacteria by disrupting the proteins that build their protective armor.
 
 
 Alzheimer's disease also affects small blood vessels
 
Alzheimer's disease also affects small blood vesselsA research conducted by the UAB demonstrates that mice suffering from this disease also have substantial malfunctions in small blood vessels, important in nourishing different organs and tissues and in regulating blood pressure, and which mainly affects females.
 
 
 Opioid maker funds efforts to fight addiction: Is it ‘blood money’ or charity?
 
Opioid maker funds efforts to fight addiction: Is it ‘blood money’ or charity?A program to give naloxone overdose-antidote kits and training to front-line officers. Funding for pill disposal boxes in pharmacies, clinics and police stations across North Carolina. A radio campaign in Connecticut warning of the dangers of opioid abuse. A new medicine to treat opioid-induced constipation.
 
 
 Graduate students more likely to experience depression and anxiety, survey finds
 
Graduate students more likely to experience depression and anxiety, survey findsGraduate students are more than six times as likely to experience depression and anxiety as compared to the general population, according to a comprehensive survey of 2,279 individuals conducted via social media and direct email.
 
 
 No-go for Idaho: Back to the drawing board on state-based health plans
 
No-go for Idaho: Back to the drawing board on state-based health plansNo, you can't. That's what federal officials told Idaho regulators and the state's governor late Thursday regarding the state's plan to allow insurers to sell health plans that fall short of the Affordable Care Act's requirements.
 
 
 Precision oncology may improve overall survival, lower healthcare costs for advanced cancer patients
 
Precision oncology may improve overall survival, lower healthcare costs for advanced cancer patientsThe use of advanced molecular diagnostic technologies, such as Next-Generation Sequencing-based gene panel testing, to select targeted therapies in advanced cancer patients is known as precision oncology.
 
 
 UCLA-developed nanospears could make gene therapies safer, faster and more cost-effective
 
UCLA-developed nanospears could make gene therapies safer, faster and more cost-effectiveUCLA scientists have developed a new method that utilizes microscopic splinter-like structures called "nanospears" for the targeted delivery of biomolecules such as genes straight to patient cells. These magnetically guided nanostructures could enable gene therapies that are safer, faster and more cost-effective.
 
 
 Special issue aims to bring medical cannabis into mainstream medicine
 
Special issue aims to bring medical cannabis into mainstream medicineMedicinal cannabis is safe and effective in pain relief, and researchers are calling for the treatment to be properly established in our modern medical arsenal.
 
 
 Participants in rogue herpes vaccine research take legal action
 
Participants in rogue herpes vaccine research take legal actionThree people injected with an unauthorized herpes vaccine by a Southern Illinois University researcher have filed suit against his company, demanding compensation for alleged adverse side effects from the experiments.
 
 
 UC researcher granted patent for potential pulmonary infection treatment
 
UC researcher granted patent for potential pulmonary infection treatmentA researcher in the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine has been granted a U.S. patent for a potential treatment for a pulmonary infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
 
 
 Tackling Hand Hygiene Barriers in Healthcare
 
Tackling Hand Hygiene Barriers in HealthcareHand hygiene is critical to preventing the spread of infection in hospitals. Current methods are outdated, and new technologies are expensive. Zoono's products offer an alternative to alcohol-based hand sanitizers that protect the skin's surface for longer.
 
 
 Research highlights methods to identify antibiotic related kidney damage in children with CF
 
Research highlights methods to identify antibiotic related kidney damage in children with CFNew research, published in Nature Scientific Reports, conducted by the University and partners highlights effective methods for identifying a common side effect in children receiving drug treatments for Cystic fibrosis.
 
 
 Genetic variant discovery could improve safety, effectiveness of drugs for asthma and COPD
 
Genetic variant discovery could improve safety, effectiveness of drugs for asthma and COPDResearch from the University of Liverpool, published today in Lancet Respiratory Medicine, identifies a genetic variant that could improve the safety and effectiveness of corticosteroids, drugs that are used to treat a range of common and rare conditions including asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
 
 
 Graphic: Opioid painkiller is top prescription in 11 states
 
Graphic: Opioid painkiller is top prescription in 11 statesAmericans fill about 4.5 billion prescriptions each year, at a cost of more than $323 billion. But what are we actually buying? In 11 states, the top prescriptions are opioid pain pills that are mixtures of acetaminophen and hydrocodone (brand names Vicodin and Norco), according to new data from GoodRx, an online prescription cost service.
 
 
 Maternal obesity and androgen excess induce sex-specific anxiety in offspring, study suggests
 
Maternal obesity and androgen excess induce sex-specific anxiety in offspring, study suggestsMaternal obesity and androgen excess induce sex-specific anxiety in the offspring, according to a study on mice by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in The FASEB Journal.
 
 
 New University of Bath project seeks to make injections safer
 
New University of Bath project seeks to make injections saferDue to the complicated nature of preparing injections, mistakes are made in around a third of doses. Although these are often minor errors, it is a statistic that University of Bath pharmacist Dr Matthew Jones wants to change with a new project to improve patient safety.
 
 
 Identifying Impurity and Characterization
 
Identifying Impurity and CharacterizationPresently ICH M7 and other guidelines give an overview of evaluation and assessment of limits of pharmaceutical impurities categorized as mutagenic.