Nosopharm and UIC reveal pharmacology of new class of antibiotics to combat drug resistance
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  April 12, 2018  
  Pharmacy / Pharmacology  
  The latest pharmacy / pharmacology news from News Medical  
 Nosopharm and UIC reveal pharmacology of new class of antibiotics to combat drug resistanceNosopharm and UIC reveal pharmacology of new class of antibiotics to combat drug resistance
 
Nosopharm, a company dedicated to the research and development of new anti-infective drugs, and the University of Illinois at Chicago today announce the publication of a study in Molecular Cell on the mechanism of action of odilorhabdins, a new class of antibiotics to combat antibiotic resistance.
 
 
 Validating the Diagnosis of DepressionValidating the Diagnosis of Depression
 
Parry outlines her research in diagnosing depression, which led to her winning the Pittcon 2018 Achievement Award.
 
 
 Human genome is like a time machine, says researcherHuman genome is like a time machine, says researcher
 
The human genome is a bit like a time machine, says Ben Voight, an associate professor in Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics and of Genetics in Penn's Perelman School of Medicine.
 
   Long-term consumption of caffeine has negative effects for Alzheimer's diseaseLong-term consumption of caffeine has negative effects for Alzheimer's disease
 
A study coordinated by the Institute of Neuroscience of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden provides evidence that a long-term consumption of caffeine has negative effects for Alzheimer's disease, worsening the neuropsychiatric symptoms appearing in the majority of those affected by the disorder. The research was recently published in Frontiers in Pharmacology.
 
   Researchers suggest alternative therapy for heart attack patients with beta blocker intoleranceResearchers suggest alternative therapy for heart attack patients with beta blocker intolerance
 
Beta blockers have become a prescription drug staple for recovering heart attack patients. However, these blood pressure-reducing medications cannot be tolerated by many patients who are at higher risk for developing cardiovascular disease, including those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, the elderly, and diabetics.
 
   Free Radical Formation in Electronic Cigarette AerosolsFree Radical Formation in Electronic Cigarette Aerosols
 
An interview with Prof. John Richie, describing his presentation at Pittcon 2018 on free radical formation in electronic cigarette aerosols.
 
   Study reveals unexpected mechanism that induces thirst after alcohol or sugar exposureStudy reveals unexpected mechanism that induces thirst after alcohol or sugar exposure
 
Why does drinking alcohol or consuming sugar make us thirsty? An international study of mice in Texas and humans in Europe reveals an unexpected anti-dehydration mechanism.
 
 PET imaging agent may help predict effectiveness of depression treatment
 
PET imaging agent may help predict effectiveness of depression treatmentA positron emission tomography imaging agent could show, ahead of time, whether a specific treatment is likely to be effective for major depressive disorder--a debilitating condition that affects more than 14 million Americans.
 
 
 Popular e-cigarette flavors produce different levels of toxins
 
Popular e-cigarette flavors produce different levels of toxinsThe flavor of an e-cigarette may affect more than a consumer's taste buds, according to Penn State researchers who say the chemicals that make up different flavors also produce different levels of free radicals, toxins often associated with cancer and other diseases.
 
 
 Researchers find link between common genetic variant and AFib risk in Latinos
 
Researchers find link between common genetic variant and AFib risk in Latinos"There is a paradox at play when it comes to atrial fibrillation in the Latino population," said Dr. Dawood Darbar.
 
 
 Finding new drug target for common form of lung cancer
 
Finding new drug target for common form of lung cancerResearch by Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey investigators has identified novel functions of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) enzyme providing support that it could serve as a therapeutic target in the most common type of lung cancer.
 
 
 New research sheds light on how neurons in the brain communicate with one another
 
New research sheds light on how neurons in the brain communicate with one anotherResearchers from the University of Leicester have shed new light on how neurons in the brain communicate with one another. This could potentially help in our understanding of how and why a range of neurodegenerative diseases occur.
 
 
 Children with autism more likely to be prescribed antipsychotic medication, study finds
 
Children with autism more likely to be prescribed antipsychotic medication, study findsA new study by Swansea University has suggested that children with intellectual difficulty or autism are more likely to be given antipsychotic medication from a younger age than those without intellectual disability and have higher rates of hospitalization for depression and for injury and also are at risk of other medical side effects.
 
 
 Scientists developing new vaccines against heroin and prescription opioids
 
Scientists developing new vaccines against heroin and prescription opioidsHeroin and prescription opioid abuse and fatal overdoses are a public health emergency in the United States. Vaccines offer a potential new strategy to treat opioid abuse and prevent fatal opioid overdoses.
 
 
 TradeShow Talks with Cytosurge
 
TradeShow Talks with CytosurgeThe ground-breaking FluidFM BOT for Injection and the FluidFM nanosyringe will presented for the first time at Analytica.
 
 
 FDA launches criminal investigation into unauthorized herpes vaccine research
 
The Food and Drug Administration has launched a criminal investigation into research by a Southern Illinois University professor who injected people with his unauthorized herpes vaccine, Kaiser Health News has learned.
 
 
 New tiny fiber-optic probe can measure temperature and see deep inside the body
 
New tiny fiber-optic probe can measure temperature and see deep inside the bodyUniversity of Adelaide researchers have invented a world-first tiny fiber-optic probe that can simultaneously measure temperature and see deep inside the body.
 
 
 UCLA scientists identify four subtypes of melanoma with different drug sensitivities
 
UCLA scientists identify four subtypes of melanoma with different drug sensitivitiesMelanoma, a relatively rare but deadly skin cancer, has been shown to switch differentiation states - that is, to regress to an earlier stage of development - which can lead it to become resistant to treatment.
 
 
 Analysis does not reveal consistent link between NSAIDs use and exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease
 
Analysis does not reveal consistent link between NSAIDs use and exacerbation of inflammatory bowel diseaseContrary to generally accepted belief, a recent review and analysis of published studies did not reveal a consistent association between the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or acetaminophen and exacerbation of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
 
 
 Johns Hopkins scientist calls for more integration of epigenetics and genetics research
 
Johns Hopkins scientist calls for more integration of epigenetics and genetics researchIn a review article published April 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientist Andrew Feinberg, M.D., calls for more integration between two fields of DNA-based research: genetics and epigenetics.
 
 
 Research team identifies new class of antibiotics to fight drug resistance
 
Research team identifies new class of antibiotics to fight drug resistanceResearchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Nosopharm, a biotechnology company based in Lyon, France, are part of an international team reporting on the discovery of a new class of antibiotics.
 
 
 Sulfur amino acid restriction consistently demonstrates range of health benefits in animals
 
Sulfur amino acid restriction consistently demonstrates range of health benefits in animalsThe longevity and health improvements seen in animals on sulfur amino acid-restricted diets could translate to people, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers who recently conducted a review of published studies. More research is needed to confirm the benefits in people, the scientists said.
 
 
 Hypercaloric food intake promotes major behavioral and cognitive changes
 
Hypercaloric food intake promotes major behavioral and cognitive changesMice fed on a high fat or chocolate-based diet show abnormal feeding behaviors such as snacking, bingeing and disrupted eating patterns, according to new research from scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation and the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Spain.
 
 
 Experts explore how degenerative processes impair the body's detoxification system
 
Experts explore how degenerative processes impair the body's detoxification systemA poor diet and other risk factors can result in liver disease. This important metabolic organ can become fatty and inflamed. In the long term, this may result in irreversible and life-threatening organ damage (cirrhosis of the liver or 'shrunken liver').