Study highlights need for personalized approaches to prostate cancer screening in high-risk black men
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  May 2, 2017  
  Prostate Cancer  
  The latest prostate cancer news from News Medical  
 Study highlights need for personalized approaches to prostate cancer screening in high-risk black menStudy highlights need for personalized approaches to prostate cancer screening in high-risk black men
 
A new study indicates that higher prostate cancer death rates among black men in the US may be due to a higher risk of developing preclinical prostate cancer as well as a higher risk of that cancer progressing more quickly to advanced stages.
 
 
 Study: Prostate cancer patients willing to pay up to $2,000 for new high-tech biopsy techniqueStudy: Prostate cancer patients willing to pay up to $2,000 for new high-tech biopsy technique
 
Prostate cancer patients are willing to pay up to $2,000 of their own money for a new high-tech biopsy technique that significantly improves accuracy, according to a study published in the journal Urology Practice.
 
   Drinking more than three cups of Italian-style coffee each day lowers prostate cancer riskDrinking more than three cups of Italian-style coffee each day lowers prostate cancer risk
 
Add another typical component of the Italian way of life to the long list of foods characterizing one of the most healthy populations in the world. This time it's coffee, prepared the Italian way.
 
 Access to prostate cancer treatments in the UK
 
Access to prostate cancer treatments in the UKA major reason for the unmet need in prostate cancer in the UK is the length of time it takes to get new treatments through the reimbursement system with NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence). This has a long-term impact on the UK, making the UK far behind the rest of Europe and even globally in terms of standard of care.
 
 
 Study: New gene editing strategy effectively targets cancer-causing ‘fusion genes’ in mouse models
 
Study: New gene editing strategy effectively targets cancer-causing ‘fusion genes’ in mouse modelsA novel gene therapy using CRISPR genome editing technology effectively targets cancer-causing "fusion genes" and improves survival in mouse models of aggressive liver and prostate cancers, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers report in a study published online today in Nature Biotechnology.