Individual damaged nerve cells cause neurodegenerative diseases
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  March 13, 2018  
  Neurology / Neuroscience  
  The latest neurology news from News Medical  
 Individual damaged nerve cells cause neurodegenerative diseasesIndividual damaged nerve cells cause neurodegenerative diseases
 
If the sense of smell disappears, this can indicate a disease such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. However, unlike previously assumed, general degenerations in the nervous system do not play a leading role in the loss of the sense of smell with increasing age, but individual nerve cells or classes of nerves are decisive.
 
   Researchers seek to discover role of filter ventilation on addictive potential of cigarettesResearchers seek to discover role of filter ventilation on addictive potential of cigarettes
 
Would banning ventilated filters on cigarettes protect public health? Scientists from multiple institutions, including a group of addiction neuroscience researchers from the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, are gathering evidence under funding from the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute to potentially inform a U.S.
 
   TSRI research offers explanation for why neurons die off in Parkinson's diseaseTSRI research offers explanation for why neurons die off in Parkinson's disease
 
An estimated 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson's disease--an incurable neurodegenerative disorder that leads to an increasing loss of motor control.
 
 Activation of pregnant mother's immune system can affect baby's brain development, study reveals
 
Activation of pregnant mother's immune system can affect baby's brain development, study revealsA landmark study published in the Journal of Neuroscience on February 26 reveals that activation of a pregnant mother's immune system can affect her baby's brain development.
 
 
 Study shows importance of family history in onset of Alzheimer's disease
 
Study shows importance of family history in onset of Alzheimer's diseaseYou're about to turn 60, and you're fretting. Your mother has had Alzheimer's disease since the age of 65. At what age will the disease strike you? A Canadian study published in JAMA Neurology shows that the closer a person gets to the age at which their parent exhibited the first signs of Alzheimer's, the more likely they are to have amyloid plaques, the cause of the cognitive decline associated with the disease, in their brain.
 
 
 Research identifies new biomarkers for future dementia risk
 
Research identifies new biomarkers for future dementia riskSudha Seshadri, M.D., founding director of the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's & Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio, is co-leader and senior author on research announced March 6 that identifies novel biomarkers of risk for future dementia.
 
 
 Boosting the brain's immune cells may prevent or reduce severity of Alzheimer's disease
 
Boosting the brain's immune cells may prevent or reduce severity of Alzheimer's diseaseSanford Burnham Prebys Medical Research Institute researchers have published two new studies in Neuron that describe how TREM2, a receptor found on immune cells in the brain, interacts with toxic amyloid beta proteins to restore neurological function.
 
 
 Impaired transport processes in neurons contribute to neurodegenerative disorders
 
Impaired transport processes in neurons contribute to neurodegenerative disordersTwo partners have to find their way to each other in order to transport substances to the remote ends of special nerve fibers to maintain their function. If this partnering process is disturbed, the cells may die in the worst case, resulting in neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or spinal muscular atrophy.
 
 
 Scientists uncover detailed map of the brain circuits behind thirst and satiety
 
Scientists uncover detailed map of the brain circuits behind thirst and satietyScientists uncovered a high-resolution map of the wiring inside the mouse brain's thirst center. With these blueprints, they could trick mice into becoming light or heavy water drinkers.
 
 
 Migraine is Just like Asthma. No, Really.
 
Migraine is Just like Asthma. No, Really.As strange as it may seem, migraine should be treated similar to asthma. Both diseases present symptoms in need of immediate rescue, and both conditions aim to achieve the ultimate goal of disease prevention.
 
 
 Early life stress or trauma could rewire the brain for later neuropathological disorders
 
Early life stress or trauma could rewire the brain for later neuropathological disordersFederal researchers have discovered that severe stress or trauma early in life could actually change how the brain responds to stress hormones, essentially "re-wiring" the brain for later neuropathological disorders, according to a study, "A role for corticotrophin releasing factor signaling in the lateral habenula and its modulation by early life stress," published in Science Signaling, March 6.
 
 
 Smart sleep tips to help people prepare for daylight saving time
 
Smart sleep tips to help people prepare for daylight saving timeSleep keeps the brain working properly. It helps us control our weight, as well as our emotions. It is also plays a role in helping to heal and repair the heart and blood vessels.
 
 
 Pain begins differently for men and women at the cellular level, research says
 
Pain begins differently for men and women at the cellular level, research saysNew research from The University of Texas at Dallas supports the growing consensus that pain begins differently for men and women at the cellular level.
 
 
 Plymouth researcher receives grant to further investigate causes of hereditary neuro-tumors
 
Plymouth researcher receives grant to further investigate causes of hereditary neuro-tumorsThe University of Plymouth will be continuing its research into the advancement of neuro-tumor treatments thanks to more than £100,000 from Great Ormond Street Hospital Children's Charity and Sparks, the medical research charity.
 
 
 Infants process pain in their brains in different ways based on age
 
Infants process pain in their brains in different ways based on ageReliance on behavioral indicators, such as crying, to assess pain in infants underestimates how much pain babies actually feel when they undergo stressful medical procedures.