Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce cardiovascular disease risk
Can't see this email? View it online
   
  November 30, 2018  
  Cardiology  
  The latest cardiology news from News Medical  
 Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce cardiovascular disease riskLifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce cardiovascular disease risk
 
Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke by 40 to 70 percent, according to a new Iowa State University study. Spending more than an hour in the weight room did not yield any additional benefit, the researchers found.
 
   Paleo diet linked to heart disease biomarkerPaleo diet linked to heart disease biomarker
 
More than twice the amount of a key biomarker linked closely to heart disease has been found in the blood of people on the paleo diet.
 
   Heart failure patients with stronger hearts have more depressive symptoms, lower quality of lifeHeart failure patients with stronger hearts have more depressive symptoms, lower quality of life
 
Heart failure patients fall into two general categories: those with weaker hearts, and those with stronger, but stiffer hearts that continue to eject the normal volume of blood with every beat.
 
 Curry spice may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure
 
Curry spice may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failureNew research suggests that curcumin, a main ingredient in curry, may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
 
 
 Researchers reveal previously unknown genetic effect that can raise or reduce risk of heart disease
 
Researchers reveal previously unknown genetic effect that can raise or reduce risk of heart diseaseAtherosclerotic disease, the slow and silent hardening and narrowing of the arteries, is a leading cause of mortality worldwide, responsible for more than 15 million deaths each year, including an estimated 610,000 people in the United States.
 
 
 Study: One in five young adults in India has hypertension
 
Study: One in five young adults in India has hypertensionOne in five young adults in India has high blood pressure, according to research presented at the 70th Annual Conference of the Cardiological Society of India. That equates to around 80 million people, which is more than the entire UK population.
 
 
 Early treatment does not reduce risk of heart disease, shows study
 
Early treatment does not reduce risk of heart disease, shows studyWhen is high blood pressure dangerous? Medical associations offer widely differing answers. In the USA, for example, patients are seen as hypertensive much sooner than in Germany.
 
 
 Static and dynamic physical activities offer varying protection against heart disease
 
Static and dynamic physical activities offer varying protection against heart diseaseWhile it is well known that physical activity is important for heart health, neither research nor recommendations consistently differentiate between the benefits of different types of physical activity.
 
 
 AHA and ADA launch new initiative to help people with type 2 diabetes reduce heart disease risk
 
AHA and ADA launch new initiative to help people with type 2 diabetes reduce heart disease riskThe American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association today launched their new, multi-year awareness and education initiative, Know Diabetes by Heart, to reduce cardiovascular deaths, heart attacks and strokes in people living with type 2 diabetes
 
 
 Risk factors for cardiovascular disease closely track with changes in diet patterns
 
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease closely track with changes in diet patternsDuring the holiday season, it can be difficult for even the most determined of us to stick to a healthy diet. A piece of Halloween candy here, a pumpkin spice latte there, and suddenly we're left feeling like we forgot what vegetables taste like.
 
 
 Workplace bullying or violence linked to higher risk of cardiovascular problems
 
Workplace bullying or violence linked to higher risk of cardiovascular problemsPeople who are bullied at work or experience violence at work are at higher risk of heart and brain blood vessel problems, including heart attacks and stroke, according to the largest prospective study to investigate the link, which is published in the European Heart Journal today (Monday).
 
 
 Achieving new guideline blood pressure goals may prevent 3 million cardiovascular events
 
Achieving new guideline blood pressure goals may prevent 3 million cardiovascular eventsIn 2017, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association released new blood pressure guidelines, lowering hypertension threshold to 130/80 mm Hg from the previous 140/90 mm Hg.
 
 
 Researchers show how proteins interact in hypoxic conditions to facilitate mitochondrial fission
 
Researchers show how proteins interact in hypoxic conditions to facilitate mitochondrial fissionDuring a heart attack the supply of oxygen to heart cells is decreased. This reduced oxygen level, called hypoxia, causes the cell's powerhouses, the mitochondria, to fragment, impairing cell function and leading to heart failure. Until now, few details were known on how this important process occurs.
 
 
 Botulinum toxin injections show promise to suppress postoperative atrial fibrillation
 
Botulinum toxin injections show promise to suppress postoperative atrial fibrillationPostoperative atrial fibrillation is a common complication, affecting one quarter to one half of all patients following cardiac surgery.
 
 
 Obesity significantly increases risk of Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease
 
Obesity significantly increases risk of Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery diseaseA Cleveland Clinic genetic analysis has found that obesity itself, not just the adverse health effects associated with it, significantly increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The paper was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open.