Study sheds new light on seasonal skin changes
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  March 15, 2018  
  Dermatology  
  The latest dermatology news from News Medical  
 Study sheds new light on seasonal skin changesStudy sheds new light on seasonal skin changes
 
A new British Journal of Dermatology study provides information that may help explain why many people experience eczema and dry skin in the winter.
 
   New suggests different approach to eczema treatmentNew suggests different approach to eczema treatment
 
Eczema affects about 17 percent of children in developed countries and is often the gateway to food allergy and asthma, initiating an "atopic march" toward broader allergic sensitization.
 
   Tips to help control oily skinTips to help control oily skin
 
Although oily skin can clog pores and lead to increased acne breakouts, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say oily skin also has many benefits. Oil helps preserve the skin, and people with oily skin tend to have thicker skin and fewer wrinkles.
 
 Early dermatology consultation for presumptive cellulitis can improve outcomes, prevent misdiagnoses
 
Early dermatology consultation for presumptive cellulitis can improve outcomes, prevent misdiagnosesStudy finds that early dermatology consultation for presumptive cellulitis can improve patient outcomes, reduce costs and reduce unnecessary hospitalization.
 
 
 Key protein involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression guides skin cell renewal
 
Key protein involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression guides skin cell renewalApproximately once a month, our skin completely renews itself. If this highly coordinated process goes awry, it can lead to a variety of skin diseases, ranging from skin cancer to psoriasis.
 
 
 Researchers report potential new role for skin bacteria in protecting against cancer
 
Researchers report potential new role for skin bacteria in protecting against cancerScience continues to peel away layers of the skin microbiome to reveal its protective properties. In a study published in Science Advances on February 28, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report a potential new role for some bacteria on the skin: protecting against cancer.
 
 
 Preventing Keratoacanthoma
 
Preventing KeratoacanthomaKeratoacanthoma is a benign skin cancer skin condition caused by exposure to the sun. Keratoacanthoma originates in the hair follicle and is not known to spread. It is very similar to the Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC). However, this is a much more aggressive type of skin cancer that can cause considerable disfigurement.