UCLA study questions value of BRCA genetic testing in general population
Can't see this email? View it online
   
  Genetics  
  The latest Genetics news from News Medical  
 UCLA study questions value of BRCA genetic testing in general populationUCLA study questions value of BRCA genetic testing in general population
 
Women who are carriers of mutated BRCA genes are known to have a significantly higher risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers than those who don't have the mutations.
 
 
 Desmoplasmic melanoma may possess unprecedented burden of gene mutations, say UCSF scientistsDesmoplasmic melanoma may possess unprecedented burden of gene mutations, say UCSF scientists
 
A rare, deadly form of skin cancer known as desmoplasmic melanoma (DM) may possess the highest burden of gene mutations of any cancer, suggesting that immunotherapy may be a promising approach for treatment, according to an international team led by UC San Francisco scientists. One of these mutations, never before observed in any cancer, may shield nascent DM tumors from destruction by the immune system and allow further mutations to develop.
 
   CEVEC launches unique cell-expression system for scalable production of gene therapy vectorsCEVEC launches unique cell-expression system for scalable production of gene therapy vectors
 
CEVEC Pharmaceuticals GmbH, the expert in the production of tailor-made recombinant glycoproteins and gene therapy vectors, today announced the introduction of its unique cell-expression system, CAP GT, for the fully scalable production of gene therapy vectors, based on the Company's proprietary CAP technology.
 
   Researchers find answer to continuing debate in the cardiovascular scientific worldResearchers find answer to continuing debate in the cardiovascular scientific world
 
Researchers from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, together with the teams of Dr. Martin Farrell at Oxford University, and Dr. Sekar Kathiresan at the Broad Institute, have found the answer to an ongoing debate in the cardiovascular scientific world. Dr. Ruth McPherson and Dr.
 
   Study reveals new epigenetic mechanism underlying progression of cancer tumorsStudy reveals new epigenetic mechanism underlying progression of cancer tumors
 
Aggressive cancer growth and alterations in gene activity without changes in DNA sequence (epigenetics) are associated with mutant p53 proteins, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
 University of Helsinki researchers develop new method for controlling the activation of genes in a cell
 
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, have developed a new method which enables the activation of genes in a cell without changing the genome. Applications of the method include directing the differentiation of stem cells.
 
 
 Nearly 50% of testicular cancer risk passed down genetically, new study reports
 
Almost half of the risk of developing testicular cancer comes from the DNA passed down from our parents, a new study reports.
 
 
 Scientists map genes responsible for early embryonic development in humans
 
Scientists map genes responsible for early embryonic development in humansAn international team of scientists led from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet has for the first time mapped all the genes that are activated in the first few days of a fertilized human egg. The study, which is being published in the journal Nature Communications, provides an in-depth understanding of early embryonic development in human - and scientists now hope that the results will help finding for example new therapies against infertility.
 
 
 University of Bonn researchers find how cells in the body can detect genetic material of retroviruses
 
University of Bonn researchers find how cells in the body can detect genetic material of retrovirusesResearchers at the University of Bonn have discovered how cells in the body can detect the genetic material of so-called retroviruses. The pathogen of the immunodeficiency disease AIDS, the HI-1 virus, also belongs to this group. At the same time, the HI virus appears to circumvent this important defense mechanism.
 
 
 Why do we sleep? An interview with Professor Wisden
 
Why do we sleep? An interview with Professor WisdenIt is true that we still do not know why we need to sleep every night. Sleep is essential for health. We have to do it every day. But nobody yet knows why. This fact amazes me.
 
 
 University of Basel scientists identify genes that play central role in development of Alzheimer's disease
 
University of Basel scientists identify genes that play central role in development of Alzheimer's diseaseGenes are not only important for regular memory performance, but also for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at the University of Basel now identified a specific group of genes that plays a central role in both processes. This group of molecules controls the concentration of calcium ions inside the cell.
 
 
 Gut bacteria play major role in diabetes, obesity depending on host’s genetic makeup
 
Gut bacteria play major role in diabetes, obesity depending on host’s genetic makeupThe trillions of bacteria in your digestive system play a major role in your metabolism, and they're linked to your risks of type 2 diabetes, obesity and the related conditions that make up "metabolic syndrome," which has become a global health epidemic.
 
 
 Study reveals presence of new genetic mutation in melanoma cancer cells
 
Study reveals presence of new genetic mutation in melanoma cancer cellsThere is strong evidence that the protein complex APC/C may function as a tumor suppressor in multiple cancers including lymphoma, colorectal and breast cancer, and now melanoma. A new study has revealed that a genetic mutation leading to repression of a specific protein, Cdh1, which interacts with APC/C, is present in melanoma cancer cells.
 
 
 SKY92 genetic subtyping signature better than current markers in predicting progress of multiple myeloma
 
Article in Blood shows the reliability of SKY92 genetic subtyping signature for prediction of disease progress for multiple myeloma patient.
 
 
 Study demonstrates effectiveness of new approach to protect humans from infectious disease
 
There are two common approaches to protecting humans from infectious disease: Targeting pathogens and parasites with medicines like antibiotics, or dealing with the conditions that allow transmission.
 
 
 Using whole genomes data to improve bowel cancer diagnosis: an interview with Professor Ian Tomlinson
 
Using whole genomes data to improve bowel cancer diagnosis: an interview with Professor Ian TomlinsonThe project aims to sequence the specified 100,000 genomes from two types of patients: first, those who may have rare inherited diseases caused by unknown or unidentified genes; and second, people with one of several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer.
 
 
 UCSF researchers lead $10 million research project on pediatric cancer
 
UCSF researchers lead $10 million research project on pediatric cancerResearchers at UC San Francisco are leading a five-year, $10 million research project dedicated to pediatric cancer, funded by the first grant of its kind to focus on a molecular pathway that underlies many cancers rather than on a cancer in a particular organ or tissue in the body.
 
 
 New study suggests potential use of targeted therapies for two subtypes of esophageal cancer
 
New study suggests potential use of targeted therapies for two subtypes of esophageal cancerNearly all advanced esophageal cancers harbor genetic mutations that can be targeted with emerging drug therapies, according to a new study published in The Oncologist on September 2, 2015.
 
 
 Scientists identify new mechanism for severe early infant epilepsy
 
Scientists identify new mechanism for severe early infant epilepsyScientists at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden have discovered a new explanation for severe early infant epilepsy. Mutations in the gene encoding the protein KCC2 can cause the disease, hereby confirming an earlier theory.