Experimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates, research shows
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  January 30, 2019  
  HIV/AIDS  
  The latest HIV/AIDS news from News Medical  
 Experimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates, research showsExperimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates, research shows
 
For more than 20 years, scientists at Scripps Research have chipped away at the challenges of designing an HIV vaccine. Now new research, published in Immunity, shows that their experimental vaccine strategy works in non-human primates.
 
 
    Keysight Developing Protease-Based Screening Assays with HIV-1 Protease
 
Human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, is the cause of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is a retroviral aspartyl protease (retropepsin) that is crucial for the HIV’s life-cycle. It cleaves freshly synthesized viral polyproteins at the suitable locations into functional protein products as mature protein components of an infectious HIV virion.
 
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   Study finds specific function of HIV protein that slows viral spread in early stages of infectionStudy finds specific function of HIV protein that slows viral spread in early stages of infection
 
A study from a Massachusetts General Hospital research team has identified the specific function of a protein found in HIV and related viruses that appears to slow down viral spread in the earliest stages of infection.
 
 Lessons from successes and failures of AIDS epidemic could inform our response to opioid crisis
 
Lessons from successes and failures of AIDS epidemic could inform our response to opioid crisisThere are important lessons to be learned from the successes and failures of the AIDS response that could inform our response to the opioid epidemic, according to a new paper by researchers at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
 
 
 Drought in rural Lesotho increases HIV risk among adolescent girls
 
Drought in rural Lesotho increases HIV risk among adolescent girlsAdolescent girls exposed to severe drought conditions in rural Lesotho had higher rates of HIV, according to a new study led by researchers at ICAP at Columbia University, a global health organization based at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, and from the Lesotho Ministry of Health and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
 
 Faulty immune receptor in HIV patients could be reason why many experience complications
 
Faulty immune receptor in HIV patients could be reason why many experience complicationsFor HIV patients, treatments that control the infection have come a long way. But many still struggle with a host of other disease-related complications such as neurocognitive disorders, cardiovascular issues, diabetes and chronic inflammation.
 
 
 Study: Reactivation of HIV-infected cells depends on its size and cell cycle
 
Study: Reactivation of HIV-infected cells depends on its size and cell cycleThanks to the development of antiretroviral drugs, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is considered a manageable chronic disease today. However, if left undiagnosed or untreated, HIV can develop into AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome), a disease which led to the deaths of nearly 1 million people worldwide in 2017.
 
 
 GW researchers receive NIH funding to study causes of high risk of heart disease in HIV patients
 
GW researchers receive NIH funding to study causes of high risk of heart disease in HIV patientsAtherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease are major complications of HIV infection and cannot currently be treated by antiretroviral treatments. The risk of heart disease increases twofold in patients with HIV.