Researchers test new vaccination strategy against HIV-related SIV in monkeys
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  November 20, 2017  
  HIV/AIDS  
  The latest HIV/AIDS news from News Medical  
 Researchers test new vaccination strategy against HIV-related SIV in monkeysResearchers test new vaccination strategy against HIV-related SIV in monkeys
 
According to the WHO, there are currently more than 36 million people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and a further 2.4 million become infected every year.
 
 
 Study highlights importance of reinforcing sexual risk-reduction messages for older women with HIVStudy highlights importance of reinforcing sexual risk-reduction messages for older women with HIV
 
A new study that compared HIV-positive women over 50 years of age with their younger HIV-infected cohorts found that while the older women were less likely to be sexually active and to report condomless sex with a male partner, those who were sexually active were not as likely to undergo screening for gonorrhea, chlamydia, or syphilis than their younger counterparts.
 
   Specific way of spelling out genetic code likely allows viruses to evade our cellular defensesSpecific way of spelling out genetic code likely allows viruses to evade our cellular defenses
 
For millions of years, humans and viruses have engaged in a constant tug of war: as our cells evolve new ways to defend us from our viral enemies, these pathogens in turn acquire new traits to sidestep those defenses.
 
 Diet, smoking and alcohol main causes of death in OECD countries
 
Diet, smoking and alcohol main causes of death in OECD countriesThe “Health at a Glance” report 2017 shows that over 10 million deaths have been recorded in the OECD countries in 2015. Thus the number of deaths on an average in these countries is 793 per 100,000 population.
 
 
 Researchers discover new way to target cancer without destroying healthy T-cells
 
Researchers discover new way to target cancer without destroying healthy T-cellsA unique approach to targeting the abnormal T-cells that cause T-cell lymphomas could offer hope to patients with the aggressive and difficult-to-treat family of cancers, finds a study involving researchers from Cardiff University.